The PRWIRE Press Releases http:// 2017-02-23T23:30:46Z KUHN Expo showcases the best in farm machinery innovation 2017-02-23T23:30:46Z kuhn-expo-showcases-the-best-in-farm-machinery-innovation Over the last two days, KUHN Farm Machinery has welcomed more than 300 dealers and customers to the KUHN Farm Machinery Expo in Cowra, NSW. The event was a unique opportunity to meet global product experts from the United States and Europe as well as get hands on experience with KUHN’s innovative farm machinery. 30 machines were showcased, across both days, demonstrating the KUHN difference through the company’s strength and technology in design and manufacturing including, for the first time in Australia, the KUHN AGT 6036 Pneumatic Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN Axent Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN HR 8040R Power Harrow and the KUHN Excelerator Vertical Tillage System. Tillage expert Wade Oman from the KUHN factory in North America was on hand to demonstrate the impressive features and innovations of the Excelerator Vertical Tillage System. Wade says with exclusive Excalibur blades to capture and slice through residue, the Excelerator Vertical Tillage System provides exceptional residue cutting, soil and residue mixing and seedbed preparation in one pass. Danny Tranter, Integrated Solutions, KUHN Australia said: “when it comes to spreaders KUHN’s AGT 6036 Pneumatic Fertiliser Spreader, with a daily output of 400ha, is perfect for fine and irregularly sized or prilled fertilisers.” “The AGT 6036 ensures precise spreading over the entire 36m working width regardless of wind, terrain inclination and fertiliser quality.” Danny added that: “As a leader in farm machinery, KUHN offers farmers the best products right around the world and the Axent Fertiliser Spreader is no exception. It is the first trailed spreader with continuous adjustment during spreading and has two spreading modules for spreading different products – granule or powder type fertiliser.” Throughout the Expo, dealers and customers were given access to live demonstrations and presentations on the full range of KUHN Farm Machinery. Mr Bruno Fetiveau, Managing Director, KUHN Farm Machinery said the Expo was a huge success with dealers and customers leaving with new knowledge and information about the impressive range of KUHN Farm Machinery and the amazing technologies that make up the KUHN difference. Vision and photographs from the Expo are available at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/j3kq47yiqlqfw8e/AABwMldKAM0evtsFY-dj7yOba?dl=0. For more information and to learn more about the KUHN difference visit www.kuhn.com.au. Ends. Media Contact: C7EVEN Communications, Adam Arndell P: 02 6766 4513/ 0403 372 889 E: adam.arndell@c7even.com.au KUHN FARM MACHINERY EXPO 2017 2017-02-07T01:30:19Z kuhn-farm-machinery-expo-2017 This February, KUHN Farm Machinery will, for the first time in Australia, be showcasing its KUHN AGT 6036 Pneumatic Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN Axent Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN HR 8040R Power Harrow and the KUHN Excelerator Vertical Tillage System at the KUHN Farm Machinery Expo. The Expo will be held in the central west NSW town of Cowra over two days (22 – 23) in February providing an opportunity for both dealers and customers alike to meet product experts from the United States and Europe as well as get hands on experience with KUHN’s innovative farm machinery. Across both days, the KUHN difference will be on display demonstrating the company’s strength and technology in design and manufacturing. Wednesday 22 February attendance is restricted to KUHN dealers and Thursday 23 February KUHN will open up the gates to customers and members of the public for the day. Those wishing to attend are required to register at www.kuhn.com.au prior to the event. As a leader in farm machinery, KUHN offers farmers the best farm machinery products right around the world and welcomes the opportunity to speak with media about this event prior to the day as well as invites media to come out on the day. A full range of images and B-roll will be available to media after the event. WHAT: KUHN FARM MACHINERY EXPO WHEN: Wednesday 22 February 2017 from 8.30am – 4.00pm (Dealer Expo) Thursday 23 February 2017 from 8.30am – 4.00pm (Customer Expo) WHERE: Cowra, NSW N.B – As the Expo is held on private property KUHN have arranged transportation to and from the site. The meeting point for transport is the Cowra Saleyards, Young Road Cowra. Media Opportunity: Interviews with KUHN product experts from North America and Europe Interviews with KUHN Managing Director, Bruno Fetiveau and KUHN Marketing Manager & Product Sales Support Australia, Sarah Govier On-site interviews with KUHN dealers and customers Photo and vision opportunities of KUHN Farm Machinery in action First look at the KUHN 2017 machinery range including balers; sprayers; tillage; fertiliser spreaders; mixer wagons; and hay making machines. <ENDS> Media Contact: Adam Arndell C7EVEN Communications 02 6766 4513 0403 372 889 E: adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Luci Smith C7EVEN Communications 02 6766 4513 E: luci.smith@c7even.com.au About KUHN Farm Machinery: Since 1828, innovation and quality have been the basis of our commitment to our customers, the farmers. They are the inspiration behind our trademark. In concrete terms, this means 2,000 patents filed and the service ensured by more than 4,540 KUHN staff worldwide. Products and services are marketed with a single trademark. 180 years of experience in manufacturing farm machinery helps us offer products and services ensured to perform to our customers’ requirements. As a leader in farm machinery, we want to offer farmers the best products, every day and right round the world. We want to satisfy increasing numbers of customers. Today 4,540 employees are proud to serve the exacting demands of farmers. Their skill and commitment also help meet these demands. International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 Showcases Geospatial’s Enabling Role in Digital Transformation 2017-02-01T04:50:00Z international-symposium-on-digital-earth-locate17-showcases-geospatial-s-enabling-role-in-digital-transformation Sydney, Australia – 1 February 2017 – Geospatial data’s enabling role in digital transformation will be on show at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney in April, combining one of the world’s most prestigious symposiums with Australia’s premier geospatial conference.   Dr Zaffar Sadiq Mohamed-Ghouse, chair & convenor of the Locate17 and Digital Earth Symposium Organising Committee, says attendees will come away with the knowledge to transform business practices in industries as diverse as agriculture, transport, construction and medicine.   “Both government and the private sector will be able to identify opportunities based on what is happening around the world,” he says. “Geospatial data underpins many disruptive and innovative organisations. Without it, companies like Uber would not be in business.”   According to Dr Mohamed-Ghouse, who is also director for NSW & International Relations of the Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI), the event comes as governments around Australia open up access to geospatial data to promote innovation.   Australia’s now freely available Geo-coded National Address File is used online to validate people’s addresses. The biggest Australian subscriber group for the Global Navigation Satellite System is not transport or surveyors, but the agricultural industry.   With a program featuring more than 130 international and Australian speakers, Digital Earth & Locate17 provides a unique opportunity to understand digital transformation practices from around the world, and to develop and leverage geospatial data.   The two main conference days will be split into eight separate streams with topics including smart cities, virtual globes, intelligent transport, agriculture, engineering/utilities, smart sensors for natural resource management, water & climate, disaster & emergency management, and the geospatial economy.   Some of the symposium’s highlights include: Susan Moran from NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive Science Team presents a special session on remote sensing and applications of global soil moisture monitoring Trisha Moriarty, Geological Survey of NSW delivers a keynote on the application of open data policy in the Earth Sciences across government, scientific and industry Singapore Land Authority & AAM presents, ‘Singapore Smart Nation: Measuring from the ground up’ David Wortley, Gamification and Enabling Technologies Strategic Solutions, delivers, ‘The role of Digital Earth technologies in digital medicine’.  The joint conference will be held 03-06 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney.  About the International Symposium on Digital Earth The International Symposium on Digital Earth is a flagship event of the International Society for Digital Earth. Founded in Beijing in 2006, ISDE is a non-political, non-governmental and not-for-profit international organisation principally promoting academic exchange, science and technology innovation, education, and international collaboration towards Digital Earth.   ISDE also explores Digital Earth as an enabling technology to play key roles in economic and social sustainable development, environmental protection, disaster mitigation, natural resources conservation and improvement of living standards.  About Locate17 The Locate Conference (Locate17) is the national conference of the spatial and surveying industries of Australia and New Zealand. The event is an initiative of the Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI), Spatial Industries Business Association (SIBA) and Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA). Barber’s pole a risk for southern sheep graziers this summer 2016-12-12T05:02:04Z barber-s-pole-a-risk-for-southern-sheep-graziers-this-summer A leading Victorian Veterinarian is warning southern sheep producers to act early on worms this summer, or risk poor animal health and pasture contamination in 2017. Hamilton-based Consultant, Dr Graham Lean of Agrivet Business Consulting, says high subsoil moisture and prolonged cool weather in southern Victoria and Tasmania has created prime conditions for worm production. “Worms are a major risk this summer, because of continual worm pick up and heavy worm burden that have accumulated due to the prolonged wet and cool conditions. So, it’s a very dangerous time for sheep to be grazing from a worm point-of-view,” Dr Lean said. “Roughly 40 percent of worms dropped on pasture now will turn into infected larvae being picked up by sheep next year in southern Victoria. That’s a high survival rate, so it is critical that it is stopped now.” Dr Lean says the conditions are reminiscent of the 2010 / 2011 season at this point in time, and it is imperative that producers drench their livestock as soon as possible if they haven’t recently done it already, so they are protected if the summer continues to be wet. “It’s a big risk this season, so I think it’s good to warn people. There is a potential to open yourself up for barber’s pole worm and small brown stomach worm and that certainly happened in 2011. It’s not a high risk, but it is certainly there,” Dr Lean said. “So, from a health and productivity perspective, it is very important not to delay that drench – the earlier, the better.” Dr Lean recommends producers use Cydectin Long Acting injection for sheep, which provides 91-day protection against barber’s pole worm and small brown stomach worm and up to 49-day persistent activity against black scour worm. “In a season like this, you will generally get worm pick-up after the first summer drench in November or December,” Dr Lean explained. “That is where Cydectin Long Acting injection for sheep is brilliant, because the alternative is to drench more frequently throughout the summer which increases the chance of worm resistance. So, you are better giving Cydectin Long Acting injection for sheep and having persistent control with less drenching.” Sheep Product Manager for Virbac Australia, Terrance Loughlin, agrees that an early long acting treatment is critical this year. “Because the season is late, some producers might delay their first summer drench, however this will mean that pastures stay contaminated for longer. Pasture contamination creates a significant risk of infection for vulnerable sheep such as weaners and hoggets. Obviously, the best way to minimise risk is to minimise contamination,” said Loughlin. Loughlin says a Cydectin Long Acting injection can negate the need for a second summer drench in the southern regions, which is particularly valuable following a wet winter. “Sheep producers in predominantly summer rainfall areas are quite familiar with the use of Cydectin Long Acting Injection for Sheep as a summer drench. Barber’s pole worm is of particular concern in northern NSW and southern Queensland sheep producers and they find that because Cydectin Long Acting is especially potent it is an important asset for combating barber’s pole worm,” said Loughlin. Dr Lean said drenching sheep for worms is a good investment. An MLA study looking at the costs of internal parasites showed that 80% of the costs of worms is in lost production most of which is not readily identifiable[1]. “Sheep aren’t worth $1.50 anymore – they are worth at least $150 a head and any reduction in productivity or increase in mortality risk is costly. So it is very profitable to keep sheep alive and healthy. Any delay of the first summer drench is really dicing with death,” Dr Lean said. “Clearly the game has changed a bit and it’s probably worth reminding people that livestock is worth a lot of money and they are grossing a lot of money. So the stakes are a lot bigger to do the job right.” Ends. For more information contact: Adam Arndell C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au [1] https://www.mla.com.au/research-and-development/search-rd-reports/final-report-details/Animal-Health-and-Biosecurity/Priority-list-of-endemic-diseases-for-the-red-meat-industries/2895 Virbac Australia's Commercial Manager recognised as a finalist in the 2016 Telstra NSW Business Women's Award 2016-09-27T01:47:04Z virbac-australia-s-commercial-manager-recognised-as-a-finalist-in-the-2016-telstra-nsw-business-women-s-award Virbac Australia’s Commercial Manager, Sarah Hunter has been named as a finalist in the 2016 NSW Telstra Business Awards. The highly sought after Awards not only recognise Australia’s most exceptional business women but are a symbol of business excellence. John Embling, General Manager Virbac Australia said: “Sarah is one of the most senior women in the $1Bn animal health market in Australia and her selection as a finalist in these Awards is a fitting accolade and we are thrilled that her contribution to the industry has been given the recognition it deserves.” With experience spanning two decades and two continents, Sarah says she sees her role as a finalist as an opportunity to promote Australian agriculture - and animal health - as a vibrant and exciting industry in which to build a career. “I am a proud Agricultural Science graduate from the University of Sydney and I love to showcase the myriad – and sometimes not immediately obvious – pathways that exist for those whose passion is for agriculture and veterinary science,” she said. “It is also great to show the way in which progressive leadership and business approaches fit naturally with creative problem-solving - a cornerstone of both agricultural and veterinary innovation” she added. Since joining Virbac Australia in 2004, Sarah and her team have been unlocking value at all levels by asking, “why not?” and breaking new ground in the way they do business and she says, anyone can do it. “All you need is to be prepared to test yourself, back yourself and not be afraid to tread a different path to everyone else.” Sarah is a finalist in the Corporate and Private Award category and will attend the Gala Dinner at Doltone House in Pyrmont on 11 October 2016 where the 2016 Telstra NSW Business Women’s Award winners will be announced. “We wish Sarah every success at the Awards and hope to see her contend the national award next month,” said John. Ends. AUSTRALIAN BEEF PRODUCER, JACK'S CREEK RETAINS THE WORLD'S BEST STEAK TITLE 2016-09-22T22:56:49Z australian-beef-producer-jack-s-creek-retains-the-world-s-best-steak-title The competition was tougher than ever with 17 countries and 83 of the world’s top beef producers entering the competition Held in London last night in a bid to win the title. The Jack's Creek winning steak came from a Wagyu F2+ 75% aged for 30 months and grain fed with judges noting it won on it's all round top quality. Patrick Warmoll, managing director of Jack's creek said of the win, “We spent considerable time selecting the entry and this win confirms that we’re the best in the world again. Winning last year was one of the biggest things to happen to us and our brand awareness rocketed and it’s been great for business. This is as much a win for Australia as it is for us.” He also added. “We will be going for the hat trick next year!” Chair of judges and butcher Keith Boxley said, “Every gold medal winner was worthy of winning the top prize but the overall winner was outstanding. It scored highly on appearance, quality, taste and tenderness.” He also added, “People are getting more selective about the meat they eat and they want something more prepared. As a butcher judging this competition, I'm looking for something that looks and tastes nice that has no gristle.” Jack’s Creeks’ award winning beef can be found in many of Australia’s top restaurants including, ARIA, black by EZARD, Catalina, LuMi Bar and Dining and many more. ARIA restaurant Head Chef Ben Turner commented that, “Jack’s Creek beef is always a consistent and tasty product” and Catalina’s Executive Chef, Mark Axisa, commented: "Jack's Creek beef is of the highest quality and the fullest flavour. It is a pleasure having the Jack's Creek dry-aged ribeye on my menu; it just flies out the door!" Jack’s Creeks’ 150+ days Grain Fed 100% black angus also won the Silver award. For more information on Jack’s Creek, interviews with Patrick Warmoll and images, please contact Annabel Carroll at Polkadot PR 02 9281 4190 / annabel@polkadotpr.com.au About Jack’s Creek Jack’s Creek is still regarded as a relative newcomer in the world of specialist beef after launching in 2000. However, in 1947 the Warmoll Family began farming in Breeza and the company’s links to fine food dates back to 1852, when the Warmoll Family emigrated from Ireland before opening butcher’s shops in the Victorian and NSW gold fields. The company is family run by co-founders and brothers, Philip and David Warmoll and sons Patrick Warmoll, MD and Robert Warmoll. Jack’s Creek is at the forefront of Australian premium beef production – processing and marketing grain fed Wagyu and Black Angus, which it ships to more than 20 destinations around the world including Japan, Saudi Arabia, China and the Germany. Key nutritional factors to consider for sheep at weaning time 2016-09-09T02:45:40Z key-nutritional-factors-to-consider-for-sheep-at-weaning-time As we head into this critical time of year – weaning time, sheep producers are being reminded of the importance nutrition plays in managing stress and easing transition for both ewes and lambs. Terrance Loughlin, Sheep Product Manager for Virbac Australia says one of the most important factors for sheep producers to consider during this time is managing trace minerals in weaners. 2015 Farmer of the year finalist, Mr Paul Routley, agrees a trace mineral top up at weaning time is critical in keeping his lambs healthy and balanced, and he is a big supporter of MULTIMIN (Copper-Free) to help achieve this. Paul and his wife, Dalles Routley, run ‘Almondvale’ near Urana in the Riverina with their family. On their 2230 hectares, the Routleys run about 1300 hectares of cereal and pulse crops, and the balance is for 500 poll ewes joined to White Suffolks for prime lamb production, 1500 poll stud ewes joined to Bond and Poll Merino rams, and 650 stud White Suffolk ewes joined to White Suffolk rams. “We’ve been using MULTIMIN (Copper-Free) for many years,” says Paul. “We always like to give our prime lambs a shot at marking, and our self-replacing lambs get a shot at weaning, just to keep them balanced.” “Most of the time, we can get half to two thirds of our prime lambs off as suckers straight from their mothers. Last year we sold lambs at 15 weeks old at an average of 25.8 kg carcass weight. MULTIMIN (Copper-Free) helps give them a real boost there,” says Paul. Latest research into mineral science has found that livestock exhibit performance benefits as a result of a rapid and balanced trace mineral top up, even in areas absent of trace mineral deficiencies. MULTIMIN (Copper-Free), delivered by a simple injection, provides a rapidly absorbed, and much needed top-up of zinc, manganese, and selenium that will help weaners transition off their mothers reducing the effects of stress and ensuring they have a strong immunity. “By keeping lambs balanced with MULTIMIN (Copper-Free), you can keep the animal healthy. If they are healthy and balanced when they are weaned, they’ll stay on that plane of growth and they will utilise feed that they’ve got, far better than if they’re sulking and sitting in the corner,” Paul said. The economic losses associated with weaning, and the effects of separation stress during weaning, which can see lambs food intake drop and subsequently reduce mineral intake from pasture and other sources, can have a dramatic impact on early growth performance which can have a flow-on effect for the lambs long-term growth potential. Paul who is also the President of the Australian Bond Sheep Breeders Association and NSW President of the White Suffolk Breeders Group, says there’s no question about the benefits of trace mineral top up at weaning with MULTIMIN (Copper-Free). “I spend a lot of time judging at sheep shows and mentoring agricultural students and I always recommend MULTIMIN for weaners. It’s a very, very good investment.” “There’s a lot of people that run sheep and there’s people that live and breathe sheep. For me, there’s nothing better than going out and seeing a mob of sheep healthy and running around happy.” Mr Loughlin highlights the other key factors for sheep producers to consider during weaning include monitoring weights and condition scores, managing the available food on offer (FOO) and the use of supplementary feeding as required. “Condition scoring sheep is an easy and accurate method of estimating the condition or ‘nutritional wellbeing’ of your sheep flock. It requires an assessment of the amount of muscle and fat covering the backbone and the short ribs of each sheep and gives a picture of the sheep’s store of energy,” says Mr Loughlin. Condition scoring a mob at key times throughout the year gives producers important information to make better management decisions in order to reach condition score targets for joining, lambing, weaning and selling. For optimum production and profitability, weaners should be no less than a score of 2 and ewes should not be allowed to fall below 2.5 by weaning. Weighing weaners on a regular basis also allows you to assess the growth rates, and distinguish animals that need drafting off for special treatment and the need for supplementation. With monitoring the available food on offer, the close association between growth rate, bodyweight and mortality risk means that supplementary feeding may be a cost-effective option in weaners. “Small increases in weaning weight can greatly improve weaner survival,” says Mr Loughlin. “For instance, studies have shown a 14 kg weaner has a 34% lower risk of death than a 12 kg weaner, and a 20 kg weaner has a 22% lower risk of death than an 18 kg weaner.” Where supplementary feeding is being used, care must be taken to ensure the provision of a balanced diet that is economically feasible. “To maintain good rumen function and assist good animal health, supplementary feeding should satisfy the animals need for protein, energy, roughage and minerals,” says Mr Loughlin. “A high energy diet based on grain may require the addition of roughage, such as hay, to ensure good rumen function. Where cereal grains are used ground lime stone should be added at the rate of 1%.” For weaners, Mr Loughlin advises early selection of paddocks is a critical component of managing weaner performance and explains that ideal weaning paddocks should include high quality feed. “For mixed perennial pastures short green feed should be 1,200 – 1,500 Kg DM/ha, ideally with improved pasture species and 20% legume. Annual clover based pastures should be around 2000-2500 Kg DM/ha food on offer and in the cereal zone consider a special purpose fodder crop or good quality stubble.” “They should also have low grass seed infestation, such as barley grass or corkscrew and good quality, easily accessible water,” he added. For Paul and Dalles Routley, running a high quality registered sheep breeding stud means their prime lambs and self-replacing lambs have to be at their nutritional best. “Our weaners just bounce away, and the growth post-weaning, its right where we want them going year after year,” says Paul. To purchase MULTIMIN (Copper-Free), visit your local agricultural merchandiser. For more information, visit Virbac Australia’s website www.virbac.com.au Ends. For more information contact: Adam Arndell C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Barrels of Rare Wines, Frivolity and Fun – The First Planted Lunch & Auction puts NSW Wines top of the menu 2016-09-05T00:58:44Z barrels-of-rare-wines-frivolity-and-fun-the-first-planted-lunch-auction-puts-nsw-wines-top-of-the-menu-1 Flowing wines, industry legends and auction experiences to make even the most seasoned of connoisseurs envious. 300 guests and VIPs celebrated the best of the NSW wine industry on Friday 2nd September at the inaugural First Planted Gala Lunch & Auction held at the Sydney Cricket Ground.   Claiming back the wine roots of Australia, guests were treated to a 3-course gourmet lunch with matching NSW wines as they relaxed and mingled with some of the industry’s finest personalities. Hosted by comedian Jean Kittson, the light-hearted event saw industry heavyweights and guests alike in barrels of laughter with PLONK creatives Chris Taylor and Nathan Earl proving the award-winning and rare wines of NSW really are irreplaceable. Sommeliers and restaurateurs from some of Sydney’s finest dining establishments such as Quay, The Imperial Hotel, Bennelong and PARKROYAL Darling Harbour, Sydney were amongst those treated to vintages old and new, with much attention being placed on the standout 2014 wines in the room.   Alongside the gala lunch, guests had the opportunity to bid on some truly ‘unicorn’ experiences and wines at the live auction, with 20 of the most hotly contested lots sold exclusively at the event. For those unable to attend, 132 lots are now live online until 9pm, Thursday 8 September with vertical vintage tasting packs of some of Australia’s most awarded wines, experiences for up to 20 people including a long lunch at Urban Winery Sydney and romantic getaways to Mudgee, Orange and the Hunter Valley.   Most noted of the exclusive auction lots sold under the hammer included your own barrel of Tyrrell’s 2016 Vat 47 Chardonnay which sold for $12,232, a weekend in Mudgee including dining at two of Mudgee’s hottest restaurants, a full-day helicopter wine tour and VIP treatment at the Huntington Music Festival that was snapped up for $3,728 and the last double magnum of 2014 Lake’s Folly Cabernet that reached a record-breaking $990.   NSW Wine Industry Association President, Tom Ward, expressed his delight at the outcome of the event and his excitement to see the result of the final online auction.   “Winemakers from across NSW have been winning awards and producing outstanding vintages for decades. We wanted to showcase our great capabilities and successes as a wine producing state and this event has allowed us this opportunity. It has been a great success in bringing NSW wines back into the conversation and we’re excited to see the flow on through the state’s wine lists and cellars. And for those who were able to get their hands on the rare wines and experiences, or are still waiting to bid on their otherwise impossible to buy offer, we hope they enjoy their unique piece of NSW wine history.”  The First Planted Auction is online until 8 September, 2016 at www.langtons.com.au     Follow us on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NSWWine/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/nswwine Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nswwine/  -ENDS-MEDIA CONTACT Holysmoke! Agency Amanda Fry, Laura Heslop or Yvonne Kong P: +61 2 8354 0931 E: amanda@holysmokeagency.com; laura@holysmokeagency.com or yvonne@holysmokeagency.com Prince of Wales forestry awards for Australia and New Zealand 2016-08-31T21:27:13Z prince-of-wales-forestry-awards-for-australia-and-new-zealand Two new forestry awards for New Zealand and Australia were announced at the New Zealand Institute of Forestry Conference in Dunedin. The Prince of Wales Award for Sustainable Forestry recognizes the achievements of an outstanding young forestry professional with a passion for sustainable forest management and a commitment to their national forestry institute. Two Sustainable Forestry awards will be presented annually, to one recipient from Australia and one from New Zealand. The Prince of Wales Forest Leadership Award is an exchange programme for forestry students with clear leadership skills, providing an opportunity to work abroad and hence develop a wider view of sustainable forestry.  Both The Prince of Wales Award for Sustainable Forestry and The Prince of Wales Forest Leadership Award reflect His Royal Highness’ keen interest in sustainable forest management and young people around the world.  Building on work already begun with the Canadian Institute of Forestry, the vision behind the Awards is the creation of a global network of young forestry professionals who are inspired to lead together on the vital matter of sustainable forest management.  Extending the Awards to Australia and New Zealand is the next big step in achieving this vision. In a combined statement, James Treadwell, President of the New Zealand Institute of Forestry, and Rob de Fégely, National President of the Institute of Foresters of Australia said that: "The Prince of Wales has long been a strong supporter of sustainable forest management as part of his interest in natural production systems". "The Prince of Wales Award for Sustainable Forestry reflects His Royal Highness’ vision for forests and woodlands to sustainably deliver the vital social, environmental and economic benefits that we are increasingly aware of. “His Royal Highness has also shown his commitment to encouraging young foresters through The Prince of Wales Forest Leadership Award which is likely to be strongly contested by outstanding young foresters in both countries." Media contacts: Australia. Rob de Fégely. Tel: +61 (0) 415 486 201 New Zealand. James Treadwell. Tel: +64 (0) 220434511 or president@nzif.org.nz MEDIA ALERT: RARE WINES GO UNDER THE HAMMER AT SYDNEY CRICKET GROUND 2016-08-30T22:06:35Z media-alert-rare-wines-go-under-the-hammer-at-sydney-cricket-ground Date: Friday 2 Sep 2016 Time: 12-6pm Location: Noble Dining Room, Sydney Cricket Ground   To celebrate the best of the NSW wine industry and to claim back the wine roots of Australia, NSW Wine Industry Association is holding the inaugural First Planted Auction Lunch and Gala this Friday at the Sydney Cricket Ground.   Comedian Jean Kittson will take the reins as host of the event while Chris Taylor and Nathan Earl from PLONK will make an appearance to interview winemakers live during the event.   Not only will guests be treated with a gourmet 3-course lunch and delicious wines, they will also have the opportunity to bid on some truly ‘unicorn’ moments with some of the industry’s finest personalities at the auction.   The NSW Wine First Planted Gala Lunch & Auction is presented in partnership with Langton’s who will be managing the auction. There are 132 available to bid online now with 20 of the most hotly contested to be sold at the event.   Some highlights of the auction lots include an exclusive guided winery tour and out of the barrel tasting experience for 8 people with a Brokenwood winemaker, your own entire barrel of Tyrrell’s 2016 Vat 47 Chardonnay, and a weekend in Mudgee including dining at two of Mudgee’s hottest restaurants, a full-day helicopter wine tour and VIP treatment at the Huntington Music Festival.  First Planted Auction, September 2, 2016, at Sydney Cricket Ground   Follow us on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NSWWine/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/nswwine Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nswwine/  -ENDS-  MEDIA CONTACT Holysmoke! Agency Amanda Fry, Laura Heslop or Yvonne Kong P: +61 2 8354 0931 E: amanda@holysmokeagency.com; laura@holysmokeagency.com or yvonne@holysmokeagency.com Leading US veterinarian to tour Australia showcasing the latest research in cattle-related trace mineral science. 2016-08-24T23:30:44Z leading-us-veterinarian-to-tour-australia-showcasing-the-latest-research-in-cattle-related-trace-mineral-science One of the USA’s leading technical services veterinarians, Dr Bob Gentry is about to tour Australia, highlighting the benefits of trace minerals in beef and dairy production. Dr Gentry, who works at Multimin USA Inc, will be travelling from Monday, 29th August to Friday 9th September as a guest of Virbac Australia. He’ll meet with rural merchandisers, local cattle veterinarians, scientists, as well as beef and dairy producers around Australia, in a series of talks that will take him across five different states. Trace minerals are essential for strong growth and optimal production in beef and dairy cattle, by regulating hundreds of bodily processes. Dr Gentry will present the latest in trace mineral science, the differences between injectable and oral trace minerals, the impact on cattle health, fertility, immunity and vaccine function, and the potential impact on profitability. Dr Jerry Liu, Livestock Nutrition Specialist for Virbac Australia, says “we are excited to be hosting Dr Gentry, who’ll present cutting edge, world class information to Australian rural merchandisers and beef and dairy producers.” Dr Gentry has over 35 years of experience as a professional vet, with a specific focus on beef cattle production, nutrition and reproduction. “For beef and dairy producers, the chance to learn the latest in trace mineral science from a global expert is truly unique,” concludes Dr Liu. Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Gentry during his visit, as well as attend any of the local events. State Date Time Town Where NSW Monday 29th August 9.00am – 11.00am Holbrook Holbook Library Complex 39 Young Street Holbrook NSW 2644 SA Monday 29th August 6.00pm – 8.30pm Mount Gambier Commodore on the Park Cnr Jubillee Highway & Penola Road Mount Gambier SA 5290 SA Tuesday 30th August 7.00am – 9.00am Mount Gambier Commodore on the Park Cnr Jubillee Highway & Penola Road Mount Gambier SA 5290 SA Tuesday 30th August 12.30pm – 3.00pm Willalooka Willalooka Tavern Riddoch Hwy Willalooka SA 5267 WA Wednesday 31st August 2.30pm – 3.30pm Bellvue The Farm Shop (CRT) Clayton Street Bellvue WA 6056 WA Thursday 1st September 11.00am – 2.00pm Bunbury Farm West Discovery 2016 Lighthouse Beach Resort Bunbury WA 6230 VIC Friday 2nd September 8.00am – 9.00am Pakenham Elders Pakenham Cnr Livestock Way & Koo Wee Rup Road Pakenham VIC 3810 VIC Friday 2nd September 10.00am – 1.00pm Wonthaggi ‘Kent Family Farm’ 289 Mill Road Woolamai VIC 3995 VIC Friday 2nd September 2.00pm – 3.15pm Leongatha Leongatha RSL Cnr Smith Street & Michael Place Leongatha VIC 3953 QLD Monday 5th September 10.00am – 12.30pm Rockhampton Park Avenue Hotel Cnr Haynes & Main St North Rockhampton QLD 4701 QLD Monday 5th September 5.30pm – 7.00pm Killarney Tannymoral Bowles Club 25 Oak St Tannymorel QLD 4372 QLD Tuesday 6th September 7.30am – 9.30am Toowoomba The Toowoomba Motel 2 Burnage St Toowoomba QLD NSW Tuesday 6th September 12.30pm – 2.00pm Glen Innes Glen Innes Services Club 120 Grey Street Glen Innes NSW 2370 NSW Tuesday 6th September 3.30pm – 5.00pm Guyra Rafters Restaurant 87 Malpas Street Guyra NSW 2365 NSW Tuesday 5th September 6.00pm – 9.00pm Armidale St Kilda Hotel 102-104 Rusden Street Armidale NSW 2350 NSW Wednesday 7th September 7.00am – 9.00am Walcha Walcha Vet Supplies Aberbaldie Road Walcha NSW 2354 NSW Wednesday 7th September 10.00am – 12.00pm Tamworth Frog & Toad Function Centre 238 Goonoo Goonoo Road South Tamworth NSW 2340 NSW Wednesday 7th September 6.00pm – 9.00pm Dubbo Cattleman's Country Motor Inn Whylandra Street Dubbo NSW 2830 NSW Thursday 8th September 10.00am – 12.00pm Orange Duntryleague Golf Club Woodward Street Orange NSW 2380 NSW Thursday 8th September 6.00pm – 9.00pm Goulburn Astor Hotel 93 Auburn St Goulburn NSW 2580 NSW Friday 9th September 7.00am – 9.00am Goulburn [Tentative] Astor Hotel 93 Auburn St Goulburn NSW 2580 NSW Friday 9th September 3.00pm – 5.00pm Camden Scibus 2 Broughton St Camden NSW 2570 Media Opportunity Interview opportunity with Dr Bob Gentry, Technical Services Veterinarian, Multimin USA Inc Interview opportunity with Dr Jerry Liu, Livestock Nutrition Specialist, Virbac Australia Interview opportunity with Dr Susan Swaney, Livestock Technical Veterinarian, Virbac Australia (VIC, SA, & WA events) Interview opportunity with Dr Matthew Ball, Technical Services Manager, Virbac Australia (QLD & NSW events) - Ends – Contact: Adam Arndell, C7EVEN Communications, 0403 372 889 / 02 6766 4513 Dr Bob Gentry: Dr Bob Gentry earned his DVM from Kansas State University in 1981. In 1996 he obtained a Certificate in Beef Cattle Production from the University of Nebraska. In 2009 he was awarded a President’s Award from the Kansas Veterinary Medical Association. Dr Gentry spent 31 years in mixed-animal practice, predominantly working with beef cattle. Prior to joining Boehringer Ingelheim in 2012, he worked as a faculty member at the University of Nebraska, lecturing on Beef Cattle Production medicine. Dr Gentry joined Multimin in 2014. His professional areas of interest are beef cattle production, nutrition and reproduction. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in beef and dairy cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Further information on Multimin can be found here. Lucerne a stand-out performer for grazing tolerance 2016-08-16T02:00:46Z lucerne-a-stand-out-performer-for-grazing-tolerance PGG Wrightson Seeds Stamina® GT5 has emerged from long testing processes, both locally and internationally, as a standout performer delivering excellent persistency, acceptable winter dormancy, strong pest and disease resistance, and yields equal to the best standard cultivars. James Sewell, PGG Wrightson Seeds Research and Development Manager, says that there are a lot of lucerne products that claim to be ‘grazing tolerant’ but the fact is not many have been tested under the internationally recognised ‘Standard Test Protocol’ in the same way Stamina GT5 has. “The results of this rigorous testing, along with the subsequent trials and published literature clearly show that Stamina GT5 is one of the best lucernes for grazing tolerance,” said James. South-west NSW producers Steve and Genevieve Affleck, turned to Stamina GT5 four years ago to improve their prime lamb production and haven’t looked back. “What started out as an experiment across five hectares of our property in Wombat, has genuinely paid off,” says Steve. “We started using Stamina GT5 four years ago when we needed to improve our pastures for persistency and to establish a high tolerance to grazing. Stamina GT5 lucerne has certainly delivered that.” The husband and wife team run a first cross ewe enterprise with some composites. Running two lambing seasons; in autumn and spring annually meant they needed consistent feed throughout the year. “Our biggest issue for pasture management is the region’s dry summers and wet winters. Here like most of NSW once the real summer bites a lot of your grasses are just useless. This is when the persistence of Stamina GT5 comes into its own,” says Steve. “Stamina GT5 has been a great way to help bridge the gap in the feed when other grasses and clovers are not available,” he said. Initially, Steve and Genevieve trialled dual pasture options on their property. The first, a pure lucerne stand that comprised 5ha of Stamina GT5 lucerne sown in the autumn four years ago. This was sown at 12kg/ha and was primarily for finishing lambs. Another 10ha was sown in 2015, and a further 15ha this year in 2016. The second was a pasture mix incorporating Stamina GT5 lucerne (3kg/ha), sub clover (2kg/ha), tall fescue (3kg/ha) and phalaris (2kg/ha). Steve sowed 10ha in 2015, primarily for his joined ewes and to provide high-quality feed during lambing. Both pastures were sown using a small air-seeder with a five-inch spacing to keep plant population dense per square metre, and to have a high level of ground cover. “It’s only a very small spacing but the resulting ground coverage and grazing tolerance in both pasture options have been exceptional,” Steve says. “We are lucky if we give the stand two weeks’ rest between grazing. It’s still really thick and dense. We wouldn’t have lost more than 2% coverage even after four years of hard grazing and we have had no issues with pests in the pure Stamina GT5 lucerne stand.” Sheep performance is another area Steve and Genevieve have experienced outstanding results. Steve said: “On the 5ha of pure Stamina GT5 lucerne stand, we turned off more than 400 lambs in the last year, while the same area carried up to 20 lambs/ha at any one time.” He added that lambs also gained an extra 2kg of weight and turned off two weeks earlier than lambs that were finished on oats. “We found that finishing on the Stamina GT5 lucerne actually gets better quality lambs quicker than having them on grazing oats. That’s why we’re pushing now to put so much Stamina GT5 in. It just gives us that flexibility with a quality feed and the sheep perform well on it.” Steve and Genevieve are also upbeat about hay harvested from the Stamina GT5 lucerne. “With our last cut we averaged nine five-foot-round bales/ha of excellent quality hay,” said Steve. “We had just sold the lambs and thought, we’ll lock it up and see what it does. After some timely rain, it took off and we decided to cut it for hay. The sheep eat the lot so it’s beautiful hay, it really is and it retains its leaf really well,” Steve added. James said: “it’s great to see Steve and Genevieve achieving such excellent yield and quality over the warmer months with Stamina GT5.” “It demonstrates that maintaining stand density, improved persistence, quality and yield can be achieved in lucerne cultivars that have been selected for grazing tolerant characteristics.” James explained that unlike Stamina GT5, many cultivars have not been subjected to the standard test protocols under the harsh Australian conditions and as such, producers should be cautious when assessing and purchasing cultivars claiming grazing tolerance. “If this claim is made, it is strongly recommended that producers request evidence and data to prove that it was run according to the industry standard test protocol,” he said. For more information on how Stamina GT5 grazing tolerant lucerne can improve your farm grazing productivity and profitability, contact your local PGG Wrightson Seeds Sales Agronomist as listed at www.springpasture.com.au ENDS. Media enquiries: C7EVEN Communications Adam Arndell 02 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Forest Growers National Conference Program - A Choice Spoiler 2016-08-15T21:34:22Z forest-growers-national-conference-program-a-choice-spoiler Forty-four speakers will enlighten delegates at the Australian Forest Growers National Conference 2016 running from 23-26 October in Launceston, Tasmania. The Conference includes a choice of 8 field tours covering industrial and private forestry, conservation and forest restoration, multipurpose farm and agroforestry, timber processing and manufacture, and wood engineering. Early bird registrations close on 30 August 2016 and the program for the Conference is available from the Conference web site, www.afg.asn.au The three Grower Workshops are expected to be very popular with some of the nations best forest owners sharing their experiences with delegates.  The Welcome Function, at the prestigious QVMAG, and the Conference Dinner provide ample opportunity for delegates and other guests to meet and mix over Tasmanian food and wine. A highlight of the Conference will be the dinner presentation of the National Tree Farmer Award. The Business Breakfast is new event and a unique opportunity to hear and discuss future markets with an expert working closely in this field. The Farm Forestry Toolbox Workshop (offered as an adjunct, free on Thursday) can help growers to learn and manage plantations for wood and financial returns. Forest owners/managers who wish to contribute to AFG National Policy are invited to attend the Policy workshops.  Delegates are also invited to attend the AGMs of both AFG and Forest & Wood Products Australia. AFG gratefully acknowledges the many sponsors/supporters with details, shown on the Conference web site.  The Organising Committee have planned a conference to more than satisfy all delegates and early registration is important to ensure your choice of activity/event can be accommodated. Register now, book accommodation and make travel arrangements to take advantage of cheaper prices.  Full Conference Program with Session and Grower Workshops http://www.afg.asn.au/news/afg-2016-biennial-national-conference   New maize silage hybrid delivers exceptional production yield for dairy farmers 2016-08-10T02:30:18Z new-maize-silage-hybrid-delivers-exceptional-production-yield-for-dairy-farmers Z71-F1 is an exciting new addition to the PGG Wrightson Seeds’ Corson Maize Seed silage range that can help farmers boost their productivity and profitability where a full season hybrid is appropriate. Northern Victorian maize grower Adam Whipp says people are now chasing Corson Maize Z71-F1 because it brings a wider harvest window, greater yield and higher profit. “Corson Maize Z71-F1 interested me because it promised above average early-growth, a tall and bulky plant with large cobs, as well as superior stay green attributes, and it delivered,” said Adam. Yields from the Corson Maize Z71-F1 were around 25 tonne/ha, an extra 5 tonne/ha increase from the traditional maize varieties on his farm. “That extra five tonne a hectare makes a big difference in terms of profit,” Adam says. Located in the heart of dairy country, west of Shepparton, at Nanneella, Adam Whipp runs a 100ha property where maize is a big part of his annual crop rotation. “Generally, I’ll grow shaftal clover for the winter from April to November, then I’ll sow maize at the end of November,” Adam says. However, increasing water costs and reduced allocations left Adam searching for a higher yielding maize silage that could offset this increasing cost. Working with his local agronomist, Adam initially sowed Corson Maize Z71-F1 as a “trial” but says it performed that well he’s made it a permanent part of his crop rotation system. “The Corson Maize Z71-F1 grew a metre taller than the other variety of maize I normally grow and has 11-12 leaves on the plant above the corn cob, compared to the standard variety which has about six leaves above the corn cob,” says Adam. “It also has a stay green gene in it and it does stay greener, so when you go to chop it, it doesn’t dry off like the other varieties. The other varieties go brown very quick but this one hung on pretty well,” Adam explained. In preparation for planting, Adam first cut the shaftal hay, then ran over the area with a disc plough, before pre-irrigating, adding a broadcast based fertiliser and incorporating it with a grader board. Five days later, Adam planted the Corson Maize Z71-F1 at 85,000 seeds/ha to a depth of 2.5 inches, and also added 50 litres/ha of liquid starter fertiliser. Adam said for this crop he used around seven megalitres/ha of water through the growing period and deployed 300 litres/ha of liquid fertiliser that he applied with a water applicator so that it “dribbled into the irrigation channel and gave the soil a nitrogen boost.” Adam said: “Corson Maize Z71-F1 is at least 10% better than the other varieties I have grown.” Feed testing on the Corson Maize Z71-F1 also showed good nutrition results, especially the starch levels and these results were supported by local dairy farmers, who Adam sold his harvested crop too. “I would definitely recommend Corson Maize Z71-F1 to other growers and to dairy farmers as a quality supplement to their pasture-based systems,” he said. PGG Wrightson Seeds Product Development Manager, Kelly Burke says Corson Maize Z71-F1 has a high grain content and above average whole plant digestibility and is suitable for warmer regions where early planting is possible. “It is ideally suited to contract silage production, targeting high yields and quality silage. Dairy farmers, in particular, can take advantage of its performance by planting early at run-off,” Kelly added. For more information on how Corson Maize Z71-F1 can improve your silage production, contact your local PGG Wrightson Seeds’ Sales Agronomist as listed at www.pggwrightsonseeds.com.au Ends. For media enquiries: C7EVEN Communications Adam Arndell 02 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Australian forestry learns from Oregon 2016-08-01T23:22:40Z australian-forestry-learns-from-oregon Lynea Advisory, in association with Oregon State University, Oregon Wood Innovation Center and the Institute of Foresters of Australia conducted a forest and forest products innovation tour of the Oregon forest sector this July. Lyndall Bull from Lynea advisory who led the tour said, ‘This 7-night tour focused on innovative techniques and approaches and fostered the love of timber and forests that is shared by foresters worldwide.’ ‘Site visits included engineered wood products, bioenergy producers, softwood lumber, secondary manufacturing and plantations, providing enormous opportunities for Australian forest experts to exchange knowledge with their US counterparts. Forests cover over 30.5 million acres of Oregon, accounting for almost half of the state, and provides over 58 000 living wage jobs1. This tour included visits to: ·       Oregon State University including the Oregon Wood Innovation Center and their soon to be built state-of-the-art Center for Advanced Wood Products Manufacturing and Design. ·       Seneca Sawmill which produces 40 per cent of its own energy use from renewable bioenergy. ·       Roseburg Forest Products that started in 1946 and has grown into one of the nation’s largest engineered wood products facilities. ·       Brightwood Corporation which manufactures window and door parts and other secondary products. ·       Bear Mountain Forest Products. ·       A range of forest types including Douglas-fir, Oak, Hemlock and Ponderosa Pine. As was identified by the Forest Industry Advisory Council, long-term growth of the sector requires innovation across all parts of the value chain. This tour provided participants with insights into opportunities for innovation across the forest products value chain and demonstrated what can be achieved when the industry has a well-developed and effective innovation system. In particular, the tour highlighted the wide range of opportunities that exist for value adding to a sustainably managed forest resource.   1.  http://oregonforests.org/content/forest-sector-economy