The PRWIRE Press Releases http:// 2017-04-18T03:45:31Z Announcing new leadership for Achmea Australia 2017-04-18T03:45:31Z announcing-new-leadership-for-achmea-australia Achmea Australia is poised to welcome a new CEO, following the news that current CEO Timo van Voorden is returning to the Netherlands – the birthplace of Achmea – after five successful years spent launching and running the company here in Australia. Timo has been instrumental in setting up the Australian division, working tirelessly to carve a niche for the organisation in mutual-based insurance and risk management for the farming community. Of his time in Australia Timo says he is most proud of what the company has achieved, particularly over the last three and a half years with the delivery of innovative, tailored and cost effective insurance for Australian agriculture businesses. “Embedded within local regional communities, our nation-wide network of Risk Specialists have been able to ensure Australian agricultural businesses benefit from our co-operative insurance approach. “They are there to provide immediate support in times of need and it is these relationships that have seen Achmea Australia achieve a 99% client retention rate and a client net promoter score four times the industry average,” Timo said. “I would like to thank Division International and the Executive Board of the Achmea Group for sending me to Australia five years ago. It has been an absolute dream job to build Achmea Australia from the ground up, and to recruit such a great group of people to do it with me,” Timo added. The Achmea Australia team wish Timo every success in the next stage of his career and is pleased to announce Emma Thomas as Timo’s successor. Emma comes to Achmea Australia from FMG Insurance, a large farm insurer in New Zealand, where she’s already demonstrated herself to be a proven senior leader, gaining extensive experience in the agricultural and financial services industry. She has been a central figure in driving the overall growth, client satisfaction and market share strategies for FMG, which is New Zealand’s leading rural insurer. Over the last 10 years Emma has held roles at FMG including National Sales Manager, Head of Sales, Service and Operations, Head of Advice and Sales and Financial Controller. Prior to joining FMG, Emma’s experience includes Executive financial management leadership of a New Zealand IT solutions company, and Audit roles with Deloitte in New Zealand, Australia and the United States. Emma has a strong affinity with agribusiness through her family and financial services background. She is committed to continuous development of her leadership and governance skills, and cultivating valuable networks within the primary industries sector. Reflecting on her new role with Achmea Australia, Emma spoke of her keenness to build on the achievements already made by Timo and the company over the past five years in Australia. “I’m excited to join the Achmea Australia team and bring my rural insurance experience to the position of CEO. Having seen first-hand the devastating impacts – both commercially and personally – of natural disasters and storm events on the farming community, the mutual ethos has a very important role in the Australian insurance industry. I look forward to building on the proud history Achmea has in supporting rural businesses and putting clients first,” says Emma. Meanwhile, outgoing CEO Timo is in no doubt that the company will remain in the most capable of hands with Emma and her team. “I am confident Emma will make a significant contribution to Achmea Australia and our clients, and as a senior female industry leader has the potential to influence Australia’s agriculture agenda,” he said. “I wish Emma all the very best of luck in her new role as CEO, and I know she has a fantastic team to support her and to continue the accelerated growth of Achmea in Australia.” Emma joins the company later this month, and Achmea Australia look forward to welcoming her to the family. About Achmea Australia Achmea Australia is a dedicated agricultural insurance company committed to reducing risks and premiums to its Australian customers. It works with its clients to prevent and manage risks across five categories: buildings; inventory; business interruption; vehicles and liability. It’s All-in-One Farm Pack allows customers to tailor their cover to their precise needs. Achmea Australia has an exclusive distribution philosophy. It believes in its collaboration and association with Rabobank which has a strong presence in rural Australia. By employing their own local Risk Specialists it is adding value to its clients with a personalised and tailored service as well as keeping costs down. Achmea Australia enjoys the financial strength of its parent company Achmea, based in the Netherlands. For more information visit www.achmea.com.au. - END- Photo Caption – Outgoing Achmea Australia CEO, Timo van Voorden Photo Caption – Incoming Achmea Australia CEO, Emma Thomas Media Contact: Adam Arndell C7EVEN Communications T: 02 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 E: adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Flooding offers mixed conditions for autumn planting 2017-04-10T06:00:37Z flooding-offers-mixed-conditions-for-autumn-planting Widespread rain across much of the country has created mixed conditions for planting winter pastures, with farmers advised to plant now or monitor soil moisture closely over the coming weeks. Allan Mudford is the Northern Product Development Manager for PGG Wrightson Seeds Australia and said the there is an opportunity for producers in the western zones of south east Queensland to plant oats and annual ryegrass. “Flooding and water logging in the eastern zones will however delay planting, but I would suggest farmers plant any higher ground with an annual rye grass like Winter Star II or Diamond T as soon as possible,” Mr Mudford said. “I would then suggest planting Italian varieties like Concord II or Nourish for late winter and spring/summer production when the lower country dries out.” Farmers living in flooded areas should also prepare for Autumn planting now. “Farmers living in flooded areas should be prepared to plant as soon as possible if no follow up rain occurs – before the colder soil and air temperatures set in,” Mr Mudford said. “In areas that have been dry all this summer current rain will allow a good opportunity to plant over the next two to three weeks.” Mr Mudford said Autumn offers the ideal window for planting winter pasture. “Autumn is that time of year that can set you up for 12 months of production. A good autumn planting can produce more pasture over your winter period, and that results in more profitability on farm,” Mr Mudford said. “When selecting a pasture variety, farmers should determine what periods they are more likely to need more feed and plan by using different varieties. For example, some producers need early winter production and some need more feed later in the winter.” An ideal planting profile would include early and late maturing pastures, to enable a high volume of winter feed and late-season pasture for hay and silage, that could be used for next winter or even in a drought. “10 years ago farmers used to plant one variety of pasture, now 60 percent of farmers use different varieties to create different production curves,” Mr Mudford explained. “There are better genetics in the varieties today and they are growing longer into the season then what they used to.” Timing is critical, with planting technique and soil moisture impacting optimum growth. “Some of the flood irrigation does not work - you can have plant damage, so the type of irrigation is very critical,” Mr Mudford explained. “It’s also important to have a good understanding of the root structure of your plants and monitor soil moisture, so you get the most bang for your dollar in terms of irrigation water.” Mr Mudford said Concord II is a good consistent variety of pasture that is suited to a wide range of soils and environmental conditions across Australia. “Concord II is fast establishing, has good rebound after grazing and has a nice densely tillered, which leads to more feed for the cows to consume,” Mr Mudford said. “It also has an exceptionally long season to it - in the north we get it to grow into late January and silage coming into Spring and Summer.” With 18 years’ experience with PGG Wrightson Seeds Australia, Mr Mudford visits a number of farms and advises farmers in different areas with different farming conditions. “Our staff have a good base knowledge of how farmers are achieving higher productivity in a large range of environments. We get to visit a wide range of farms and sometimes they have problems and sometimes they have great stories of high productivity, so we can share those stories,” Mr Mudford said. For more information on how Concord II can improve your pasture production, contact your local PGG Wrightson Seeds’ Sales Agronomist as listed at www.pggwrightsonseeds.com.au Ends. Photo Caption - Allan Mudford, PGG Wrightson Seeds Northern Product Development Manager For media enquiries: C7EVEN Communications Adam Arndell, 02 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Leading South African vet to showcase trace mineral impact on bull fertility in Australian tour 2017-04-04T00:00:22Z leading-south-african-vet-to-showcase-trace-mineral-impact-on-bull-fertility-in-australian-tour Prominent South African veterinarian Dr Martin Ferreira will touch down in Australia this week for a tour highlighting the benefits of trace minerals on bull fertility and semen quality. Dr Ferreira, whose current research investigates the effect of injectable trace minerals on bull semen quality and its freezing and fawning, arrives on Saturday April 8 and will present at six events across Australia on the six-day tour. A guest of Virbac Australia, Dr Ferreira will present on the latest in trace mineral science and how trace minerals can assist in bull fertility and semen quality. The tour is targeted at cattle veterinarians, reproduction professionals, and beef/dairy producers and aims to improve knowledge and understanding of trace minerals, which are essential for fertility and optimal production in beef and dairy cattle. Virbac Australia Livestock Nutrition Specialist, Dr Jerry Liu, said the tour was a chance for industry participants to hear from Dr Ferreira, who has over 24 years consulting experience with leading South African animal health companies. “We are excited to be hosting Dr Ferreira, who will present cutting edge, world class information to Australian industry professionals and beef and dairy producers,” Dr Liu said. “For beef and dairy producers, the chance to learn the latest in trace mineral science from a global expert is truly unique.” He said in addition to his trace minerals work, Dr Ferreira had over 26 years of experience as a professional vet, with his work taking him to many parts of the African continent, including Kenya, Zambia and Uganda. “With Dr Ferreira’s current area of research being the effects of trace mineral supplementation on bull semen quality, it’s a unique opportunity to hear from a global leader in the field,” Dr Liu said. “Dr Ferreira has also provided productivity consultation for beef, dairy and feedlot operations as well as operating his own cattle property for 21 years.” Dr Ferreira is scheduled to speak at locations including Camden in NSW, Gippsland and Western Region in Victoria, and Toowoomba and Rockhampton in Queensland, on the tour. Whilst the events are invitation only, Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Ferreira during his visit, as well as attend any of the local events. State Date Time Town Where NSW Saturday 8th April 9:00 – 16:00 Camden, NSW The University of Sydney, Mayfarm VIC Sunday 9th April Dinner time Gippsland, VIC TBA VIC Monday 10th April 11:30 – 13:00 Ensay, VIC Little River Inn (64-70 Johnston St) VIC Tuesday 11th April 10:30 – 12:00 Gazette, VIC Moyle Pathfinder Angus (2126 MacArthur-Penshurst Rd) 14:00 – 15:30 Camperdown, VIC Total Livestock Genetics (4969 Princes Highway) QLD Wednesday 12st April 12:30 – 15:00 East Toowoomba, QLD Toowoomba Motel (2 Burnage St) 18:30 onwards Toogoolawah, QLD South East Country Vets (31 Cairnscroft St) WA Thursday 13th April 10:00 – 12:30 North Rockhampton, QLD Park Avenue Hotel (Cnr Haynes & Main St) Media Opportunity Dr Martin Ferreira will deliver a presentation on bull fertility and semen quality, and how trace minerals can help. Interview opportunity with Dr Martin Ferreira, - Ends - Contact: Adam Arndell, C7EVEN Communications, 0403 372 889 / 02 6766 4513 Martin Ferreira: Martin Ferreira is a veterinarian specialist in herd health and preventative medicine. He completed his Masters of Veterinary Medicine (Bovine) at the University of Pretoria in 2000 and is currently completing his PhD at the University of Pretoria. His area of research investigates the effect of injectable trace mineral supplementation on bull semen quality, and its freezing and fawning. Mr Ferreira has over 26 years of veterinary experience in mixed practice, and over 24 years of experience working as a consultant for various animal health companies in South Africa. His work has taken him to various parts of the African continent, including Kenya, Zambia & Uganda. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of pet care products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in beef and dairy cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Further information on Multimin can be found here. Top tips to prepare for the hay and silage season 2017-03-23T01:30:20Z top-tips-to-prepare-for-the-hay-and-silage-season Regular annual hay and silage making is now common-place on many farms in Australia and while sticking to a suitable rotation throughout winter will see you through there are still some important things to consider. Pasture selection and preparation for one, is an important consideration to maximise the production potential of silage and while there is a number of factors that influence the pasture including climate, agronomic constraints and the silage system that will be used, farmers should firstly consider what best suits their whole farm program. “Harvesting high quality fodder is one of the key focus areas for KUHN Farm Machinery innovation,” says Mr Bruno Fetiveau, Managing Director KUHN Farm Machinery. “Low quality forage is unlikely to become good quality silage, so it is important that farmers consider the management of their pasture, the growth stage at harvest, as well as wrapping the bales sufficiently for storage.” Because application of fertiliser can have major implications on the quality and quantity of silage, another key consideration is the soil and plant fertiliser requirements. Nitrogen and potassium levels need to be managed to maximise yield as well and feed quality. Hay and silage production absorbs a lot of potassium from the soil, so an application in early spring may be required. Nitrogen levels also need to be monitored closely, and topdress to individual yield requirements. To address this Mr Fetiveau says that farmers are encouraged to soil test their pastures before sowing and during the growth stages to ascertain the fertility of their paddocks. For paddock preparation and throughout the pasture growth stages, weed and pest management is also an important consideration. Hay and silage making can be used as a highly effective weed control strategy, however established weeds in silage or hay pastures can reduce the feed quality and in some cases be toxic to livestock. Weeds should be controlled early-on to avoid infestations. The main weeds to consider include Capeweed, Fireweed and Patersons Curse. The same applies to in managing disease or insect damage. Common pets such as aphids and diseases such as rust can dramatically impact yield and feed quality. Finally, it is also important to take a look at machinery needs and plan for any servicing, maintenance or repairs, so you’re not let down in the middle of harvest. Growers will need to weigh up investing in machinery or utilising the services of a contractor. Machinery innovation, technology improvements and the latest precision agriculture software applications make hay and silage production much more productive and profitable. Mr Fetiveau says: “KUHN offers a large range of reliable products for hay and silage production. Our wide choice of agricultural machinery including vertical tillage systems and power harrows, fertiliser spreaders, sprayers, mowers, rakes, balers and wrappers, are all designed and manufactured using cutting edge technology.” To ensure farmers have the best machines for the next silage season, KUHN have a special finance offer until 15 April 2017 with 0.99% interest on any two machines purchased for three years with 1/3 deposit. For hay tools 1.99% interest over three years with 1/3 deposit and balers and wrappers 1.99% for four years with 1/3 deposit. For more information and to learn more about the KUHN difference visit www.kuhn.com.au. Ends. Media Contact: C7EVEN Communications Pty Ltd Adam Arndell Luci Smith P: 02 6766 4513/ 0403 372 889 P: 02 6766 4513 E: adam.arndell@c7even.com.au E: luci.smith@c7even.com.au Advances in Digital Agriculture to Take Centre Stage at International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney 2017-03-22T23:59:02Z advances-in-digital-agriculture-to-take-centre-stage-at-international-symposium-on-digital-earth-locate17-in-sydney Sydney, Australia – 23 March 2017 – Advances in spatial technology that enable digital agriculture, including a next-generation national positioning system and real-time monitoring of soil moisture levels from space, will take centre stage at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney in April. A new national positioning system accurate to between 2cm and 10cm – as opposed to 5 metres with today’s satellite-based GPS – will boost Australia’s economy by $73 billion or more over the next 20 years, much of it in agriculture, says Dr Peter Woodgate, CEO of the Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI). “To adopt techniques like precision agriculture and controlled traffic farming, farmers need to be able to position equipment and sensors with about 5cm accuracy. The conference will showcase space-based augmentation systems – including Australia and New Zealand’s joint initiative – which, subject to testing, are well on the way to achieving that,” said Woodgate. “Leveraging other regional efforts, such as a Japanese satellite-based system recently trialled in Queensland, it will even be possible to remotely control unmanned autonomous vehicles like driverless tractors from space.” Australia’s investments in positioning systems will not only pay off in higher agricultural exports but will create export business opportunities and new jobs in digital agriculture to aid the transition from sectors of the economy impacted by digital disruption. Woodgate and fellow Working Group Co-Chair, Glenn Cockerton, Managing Director of Spatial Vision, will make the first public presentation of the 2026 Spatial Industry Transformation and Growth Agenda at Digital Earth & Locate17, outlining 30 transformative initiatives for Australia. In another highlight of the event, the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will hold a special session to promote capacity building and use of data from its Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Observatory. SMAP products, which provide frequent global measurements of soil moisture from space at high spatial resolution, are freely available (http://nsidc.org/data/smap), with one of the first validation experiments carried out in Yanco, NSW. According to Phil Tickle, Program and Business Development Manager (Ag, NRM & Climate Change) at CRCSI, NASA’s SMAP data will complement data from a range of sensors used in digital agriculture, including soil moisture probes, weather stations, and animal tracking devices. Tickle is presenting the benefits of an online farm monitoring solution for the grazing industry at Digital Earth & Locate17. Called the NRM Spatial Hub, this provides access to 30 years of 30 metre resolution satellite data and tools for mapping, assessing and monitoring property infrastructure, land resources and ground cover. It is currently being commercialised by the CRCSI in conjunction with Meat & Livestock Australia. Tickle said the conference was an opportunity for farmers and land managers to learn about the spatial technologies transforming their industry, as well as to discuss potential issues, such as the ownership of agricultural big data. “We are seeing enormous development in digital agriculture capabilities and often farmers don’t have control of their own data,” said Tickle. “When you have sensors on farms feeding into data warehouses and generating broader benefits, why shouldn’t the farmer get a cut? And what does a farmer do if they want to change providers and their data is locked up in a proprietary system?” With a program featuring more than 130 international and Australian speakers, Digital Earth & Locate17 provides a unique opportunity to understand digital transformation practices from around the world, and to develop and leverage geospatial data. The two main conference days will be split into eight separate streams with topics including smart cities, virtual globes, intelligent transport, agriculture, engineering/utilities, smart sensors for natural resource management, water & climate, disaster & emergency management, and the geospatial economy. The joint conference will be held 03-06 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney. The Digital Earth & Locate17 Conference’s Market Day on Tuesday 4th April opens the exhibition to everyone and is an opportunity for private, government and start-up organisations to come together and explore collaborative and business opportunities. About the International Symposium on Digital Earth The International Symposium on Digital Earth is a flagship event of the International Society for Digital Earth. Founded in Beijing in 2006, ISDE is a non-political, non-governmental and not-for-profit international organisation principally promoting academic exchange, science and technology innovation, education, and international collaboration towards Digital Earth. ISDE also explores Digital Earth as an enabling technology to play key roles in economic and social sustainable development, environmental protection, disaster mitigation, natural resources conservation and improvement of living standards. About Locate17 The Locate Conference (Locate17) is the national conference of the spatial and surveying industries of Australia and New Zealand. The event is an initiative of the Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI), Spatial Industries Business Association (SIBA) and Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA). Spatial Startup Companies to Share the Latest Innovations at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 2017-03-14T01:00:19Z spatial-startup-companies-to-share-the-latest-innovations-at-the-international-symposium-on-digital-earth-locate17 Sydney, Australia – 14 March 2017 – Virtual reality, drones and multi-Global Navigation Satellite Systems are among the innovations to be showcased in the Startup Hub at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17, taking place from 3-6 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney. The Startup Hub is designed to bring innovators and providers of the latest spatial technologies to the attention of scientists, surveyors, businesses and government. It will be located in the exhibition hall throughout the conference, including the free Market Day on Tuesday 4th April. All exhibition visitors are invited to try out the new technologies and the new opportunities they provide. Virtual reality to reimagine the world Forum8 is demonstrating its custom 3D visualisation and virtual reality (VR) software. Complete with an Oculus VR headset, the demonstration will showcase the future of 3D experiences. Forum8’s VR-Design Studio is specifically focused on 3D VR/visualisation of urban spaces, roads and traffic, and rail. It provides a full environment for visualising a concept, including Australian terrain (DEM) and road design-type tools, vehicles and traffic settings. It is also possible to import data from a range of sources, including point cloud, road design tools and traffic simulations. The software is also used with driving simulators in engineering studies and human factors research. Rapid-fire spatial data capture Spatial Technologies Pty Ltd will showcase ground breaking technologies that are the results of research and development completed in 2016. This includes new and existing technologies like 3D laser scanning, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) point clouds and light sensors. A number of projects utilising a combination of these will be showcased, including rapid tree inspections, street light management and asset management. Multi-satellite solutions SURVEY SOLUTIONS will use the Startup Hub for its Australian launch following successful sales of its SOUTH GNSS multi-Global Navigation Satellite Systems receiver in New Zealand. The receiver uses the latest GNSS boards to receive the full constellation of satellites available, weighs less than 1kg and is affordably priced compared with competing products. Giving meaning to spatial data Professional spatial problem solvers, Anditi, will also be on hand to show how spatial analytics can solve everything from energy sources to safety. The company is showcasing its next generation platform for high-precision spatial analytics and its application in a range of industries such as solar, property, roads and infrastructure, mining, and environment. It has been designed and built in Australia to revolutionise the management, processing and visualisation of spatial big data such as high-resolution LiDAR. Anditi will also be highlighting use cases across natural and built environments where its application is benefiting clients with lower costs and higher quality outcomes. The Startup Hub will be held in the exhibition halls of the Digital Earth & Locate17 Conference from 3-6 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney. With a program featuring more than 130 international and Australian speakers, the event provides a unique opportunity to understand digital transformation practices from around the world, and to develop and leverage geospatial data. The two main conference days will be split into eight separate streams with topics including smart cities, virtual globes, intelligent transport, agriculture, engineering/utilities, smart sensors for natural resource management, water & climate, disaster & emergency management, and the geospatial economy. About the International Symposium on Digital Earth The International Symposium on Digital Earth is a flagship event of the International Society for Digital Earth. Founded in Beijing in 2006, ISDE is a non-political, non-governmental and not-for-profit international organisation principally promoting academic exchange, science and technology innovation, education, and international collaboration towards Digital Earth. ISDE also explores Digital Earth as an enabling technology to play key roles in economic and social sustainable development, environmental protection, disaster mitigation, natural resources conservation and improvement of living standards. About Locate17 The Locate Conference (Locate17) is the national conference of the spatial and surveying industries of Australia and New Zealand. The event is an initiative of the Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI), Spatial Industries Business Association (SIBA) and Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA). International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 to Boost Collaboration in Intelligent Transport and Smart Cities 2017-03-07T02:29:34Z international-symposium-on-digital-earth-locate17-to-boost-collaboration-in-intelligent-transport-and-smart-cities Sydney, Australia – 7 March 2017 – With driverless vehicles and drones poised for mass adoption, the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney in April provides a forum for government, industry and start-ups to collaborate and become players in the emerging global Smart Cities industry. “Mobility as a Service is transforming our cities and the spatial industry and technology start-ups are key parts of that,” says Susan Harris, CEO of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Australia. Harris – the keynote speaker for the Digital Earth & Locate17 conference’s Intelligent Transport stream – will outline the latest global developments and the pathways for Australia to leverage connected and automated vehicles, big data and positioning technologies. “We need to be ready in Australia. We are well placed to be part of the global Smart Cities technology industry, creating business opportunities and ensuring that our cities remain as liveable as they can be,” says Harris. “But technology is moving very quickly and early collaboration is vital.” The capture and exchange of rich 2D and 3D spatial information will increasingly underpin transport networks and cities. Driverless vehicles, for example, will constantly survey road conditions – sharing information about potholes, ice and other hazards – so other driverless vehicles, and human drivers, can avoid them. Even minor road damage like cracks will be captured and shared so authorities can schedule repairs and prevent further deterioration. Drones will also play an increasing role in the capture of 3D data, and later as a new layer of autonomous transport. “How does that spatial information get captured, managed and shared back out in ways that are reliable, safe, and commercially viable?” says Harris. “Australia is strong in both positioning technologies and big data, but we need to develop further skills and industry collaboration, including information sharing arrangements.” With a program featuring more than 130 international and Australian speakers, Digital Earth & Locate17 provides a unique opportunity to understand digital transformation practices from around the world, and to develop and leverage geospatial data. The two main conference days will be split into eight separate streams with topics including smart cities, virtual globes, intelligent transport, agriculture, engineering/utilities, smart sensors for natural resource management, water & climate, disaster & emergency management, and the geospatial economy. The joint conference will be held 03-06 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney. The Digital Earth & Locate17 Conference’s Market Day on Tuesday 4th April opens the exhibition to everyone and is an opportunity for private, government and start-up organisations to come together and explore collaborative and business opportunities. About the International Symposium on Digital Earth The International Symposium on Digital Earth is a flagship event of the International Society for Digital Earth. Founded in Beijing in 2006, ISDE is a non-political, non-governmental and not-for-profit international organisation principally promoting academic exchange, science and technology innovation, education, and international collaboration towards Digital Earth. ISDE also explores Digital Earth as an enabling technology to play key roles in economic and social sustainable development, environmental protection, disaster mitigation, natural resources conservation and improvement of living standards. About Locate17 The Locate Conference (Locate17) is the national conference of the spatial and surveying industries of Australia and New Zealand. The event is an initiative of the Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI), Spatial Industries Business Association (SIBA) and Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA). PGG Wrightson Seeds Base AR37 tops Australian Forage Value Index 2017-03-02T05:00:14Z pgg-wrightson-seeds-base-ar37-tops-australian-forage-value-index PGG Wrightson Seeds Base AR37 perennial ryegrass, has topped the charts in the new Australian Forage Value Index, just released by Dairy Australia. The Forage Value Index has found Base AR37 perennial ryegrass to be the highest performing cultivar throughout South West Victoria, Gippsland, Northern Victoria and Tasmania across most seasons. PGG Wrightson Seeds, National Sales & Marketing Manager, Cameron Henley says the Index results support the company’s long-term, ongoing commitment to research and development, which he says is the foundation for developing great pasture cultivars. “Since 1938 PGG Wrightson Seeds has proudly led the development of improved pasture plant genetics in Australia and it is the rigour of our research and testing that helps us select elite material,” said Cameron. “We work closely with farmers to get the balance right and we are pleased that Base AR37 has been recognised as the top performing cultivar across south-east Australia.” The Forage Value Index is a rating system that helps Australian dairy producers and their advisors to make more informed decisions when selecting perennial ryegrass cultivars and provides an accurate, reliable and independent assessment of the potential economic value of perennial ryegrass cultivars in different dairy regions of south-east Australia. As an excellent late season quality feed Base AR37 has shown excellent persistence and very high tiller density, high dry matter production and is unsurpassed for dry matter yield. For more information on how Base AR37 perennial ryegrass can improve your pasture production, contact your local PGG Wrightson Seeds’ Sales Agronomist as listed at www.pggwrightsonseeds.com.au The Australian Forage Value Index is a partnership between Dairy Australia, Agriculture Victoria, DairyNZ, the Australian Seed Federation and Meat and Livestock Australia. Further information about the Australian Forage Value Index and the 2017 Forage Value Index Pasture Tables are available at: http://www.dairyaustralia.com.au/Pastures-and-Feeding/Pasture/Forage-Value-Index.aspx Ends. For media enquiries: C7EVEN Communications Adam Arndell, 02 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au KUHN Expo showcases the best in farm machinery innovation 2017-02-24T00:30:46Z kuhn-expo-showcases-the-best-in-farm-machinery-innovation Over the last two days, KUHN Farm Machinery has welcomed more than 300 dealers and customers to the KUHN Farm Machinery Expo in Cowra, NSW. The event was a unique opportunity to meet global product experts from the United States and Europe as well as get hands on experience with KUHN’s innovative farm machinery. 30 machines were showcased, across both days, demonstrating the KUHN difference through the company’s strength and technology in design and manufacturing including, for the first time in Australia, the KUHN AGT 6036 Pneumatic Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN Axent Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN HR 8040R Power Harrow and the KUHN Excelerator Vertical Tillage System. Tillage expert Wade Oman from the KUHN factory in North America was on hand to demonstrate the impressive features and innovations of the Excelerator Vertical Tillage System. Wade says with exclusive Excalibur blades to capture and slice through residue, the Excelerator Vertical Tillage System provides exceptional residue cutting, soil and residue mixing and seedbed preparation in one pass. Danny Tranter, Integrated Solutions, KUHN Australia said: “when it comes to spreaders KUHN’s AGT 6036 Pneumatic Fertiliser Spreader, with a daily output of 400ha, is perfect for fine and irregularly sized or prilled fertilisers.” “The AGT 6036 ensures precise spreading over the entire 36m working width regardless of wind, terrain inclination and fertiliser quality.” Danny added that: “As a leader in farm machinery, KUHN offers farmers the best products right around the world and the Axent Fertiliser Spreader is no exception. It is the first trailed spreader with continuous adjustment during spreading and has two spreading modules for spreading different products – granule or powder type fertiliser.” Throughout the Expo, dealers and customers were given access to live demonstrations and presentations on the full range of KUHN Farm Machinery. Mr Bruno Fetiveau, Managing Director, KUHN Farm Machinery said the Expo was a huge success with dealers and customers leaving with new knowledge and information about the impressive range of KUHN Farm Machinery and the amazing technologies that make up the KUHN difference. Vision and photographs from the Expo are available at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/j3kq47yiqlqfw8e/AABwMldKAM0evtsFY-dj7yOba?dl=0. For more information and to learn more about the KUHN difference visit www.kuhn.com.au. Ends. Media Contact: C7EVEN Communications, Adam Arndell P: 02 6766 4513/ 0403 372 889 E: adam.arndell@c7even.com.au KUHN FARM MACHINERY EXPO 2017 2017-02-07T02:30:19Z kuhn-farm-machinery-expo-2017 This February, KUHN Farm Machinery will, for the first time in Australia, be showcasing its KUHN AGT 6036 Pneumatic Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN Axent Fertiliser Spreader; KUHN HR 8040R Power Harrow and the KUHN Excelerator Vertical Tillage System at the KUHN Farm Machinery Expo. The Expo will be held in the central west NSW town of Cowra over two days (22 – 23) in February providing an opportunity for both dealers and customers alike to meet product experts from the United States and Europe as well as get hands on experience with KUHN’s innovative farm machinery. Across both days, the KUHN difference will be on display demonstrating the company’s strength and technology in design and manufacturing. Wednesday 22 February attendance is restricted to KUHN dealers and Thursday 23 February KUHN will open up the gates to customers and members of the public for the day. Those wishing to attend are required to register at www.kuhn.com.au prior to the event. As a leader in farm machinery, KUHN offers farmers the best farm machinery products right around the world and welcomes the opportunity to speak with media about this event prior to the day as well as invites media to come out on the day. A full range of images and B-roll will be available to media after the event. WHAT: KUHN FARM MACHINERY EXPO WHEN: Wednesday 22 February 2017 from 8.30am – 4.00pm (Dealer Expo) Thursday 23 February 2017 from 8.30am – 4.00pm (Customer Expo) WHERE: Cowra, NSW N.B – As the Expo is held on private property KUHN have arranged transportation to and from the site. The meeting point for transport is the Cowra Saleyards, Young Road Cowra. Media Opportunity: Interviews with KUHN product experts from North America and Europe Interviews with KUHN Managing Director, Bruno Fetiveau and KUHN Marketing Manager & Product Sales Support Australia, Sarah Govier On-site interviews with KUHN dealers and customers Photo and vision opportunities of KUHN Farm Machinery in action First look at the KUHN 2017 machinery range including balers; sprayers; tillage; fertiliser spreaders; mixer wagons; and hay making machines. <ENDS> Media Contact: Adam Arndell C7EVEN Communications 02 6766 4513 0403 372 889 E: adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Luci Smith C7EVEN Communications 02 6766 4513 E: luci.smith@c7even.com.au About KUHN Farm Machinery: Since 1828, innovation and quality have been the basis of our commitment to our customers, the farmers. They are the inspiration behind our trademark. In concrete terms, this means 2,000 patents filed and the service ensured by more than 4,540 KUHN staff worldwide. Products and services are marketed with a single trademark. 180 years of experience in manufacturing farm machinery helps us offer products and services ensured to perform to our customers’ requirements. As a leader in farm machinery, we want to offer farmers the best products, every day and right round the world. We want to satisfy increasing numbers of customers. Today 4,540 employees are proud to serve the exacting demands of farmers. Their skill and commitment also help meet these demands. International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 Showcases Geospatial’s Enabling Role in Digital Transformation 2017-02-01T05:50:00Z international-symposium-on-digital-earth-locate17-showcases-geospatial-s-enabling-role-in-digital-transformation Sydney, Australia – 1 February 2017 – Geospatial data’s enabling role in digital transformation will be on show at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney in April, combining one of the world’s most prestigious symposiums with Australia’s premier geospatial conference.   Dr Zaffar Sadiq Mohamed-Ghouse, chair & convenor of the Locate17 and Digital Earth Symposium Organising Committee, says attendees will come away with the knowledge to transform business practices in industries as diverse as agriculture, transport, construction and medicine.   “Both government and the private sector will be able to identify opportunities based on what is happening around the world,” he says. “Geospatial data underpins many disruptive and innovative organisations. Without it, companies like Uber would not be in business.”   According to Dr Mohamed-Ghouse, who is also director for NSW & International Relations of the Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI), the event comes as governments around Australia open up access to geospatial data to promote innovation.   Australia’s now freely available Geo-coded National Address File is used online to validate people’s addresses. The biggest Australian subscriber group for the Global Navigation Satellite System is not transport or surveyors, but the agricultural industry.   With a program featuring more than 130 international and Australian speakers, Digital Earth & Locate17 provides a unique opportunity to understand digital transformation practices from around the world, and to develop and leverage geospatial data.   The two main conference days will be split into eight separate streams with topics including smart cities, virtual globes, intelligent transport, agriculture, engineering/utilities, smart sensors for natural resource management, water & climate, disaster & emergency management, and the geospatial economy.   Some of the symposium’s highlights include: Susan Moran from NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive Science Team presents a special session on remote sensing and applications of global soil moisture monitoring Trisha Moriarty, Geological Survey of NSW delivers a keynote on the application of open data policy in the Earth Sciences across government, scientific and industry Singapore Land Authority & AAM presents, ‘Singapore Smart Nation: Measuring from the ground up’ David Wortley, Gamification and Enabling Technologies Strategic Solutions, delivers, ‘The role of Digital Earth technologies in digital medicine’.  The joint conference will be held 03-06 April 2017 at the new International Conference Centre Sydney.  About the International Symposium on Digital Earth The International Symposium on Digital Earth is a flagship event of the International Society for Digital Earth. Founded in Beijing in 2006, ISDE is a non-political, non-governmental and not-for-profit international organisation principally promoting academic exchange, science and technology innovation, education, and international collaboration towards Digital Earth.   ISDE also explores Digital Earth as an enabling technology to play key roles in economic and social sustainable development, environmental protection, disaster mitigation, natural resources conservation and improvement of living standards.  About Locate17 The Locate Conference (Locate17) is the national conference of the spatial and surveying industries of Australia and New Zealand. The event is an initiative of the Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI), Spatial Industries Business Association (SIBA) and Geospatial Information & Technology Association (GITA). Barber’s pole a risk for southern sheep graziers this summer 2016-12-12T06:02:04Z barber-s-pole-a-risk-for-southern-sheep-graziers-this-summer A leading Victorian Veterinarian is warning southern sheep producers to act early on worms this summer, or risk poor animal health and pasture contamination in 2017. Hamilton-based Consultant, Dr Graham Lean of Agrivet Business Consulting, says high subsoil moisture and prolonged cool weather in southern Victoria and Tasmania has created prime conditions for worm production. “Worms are a major risk this summer, because of continual worm pick up and heavy worm burden that have accumulated due to the prolonged wet and cool conditions. So, it’s a very dangerous time for sheep to be grazing from a worm point-of-view,” Dr Lean said. “Roughly 40 percent of worms dropped on pasture now will turn into infected larvae being picked up by sheep next year in southern Victoria. That’s a high survival rate, so it is critical that it is stopped now.” Dr Lean says the conditions are reminiscent of the 2010 / 2011 season at this point in time, and it is imperative that producers drench their livestock as soon as possible if they haven’t recently done it already, so they are protected if the summer continues to be wet. “It’s a big risk this season, so I think it’s good to warn people. There is a potential to open yourself up for barber’s pole worm and small brown stomach worm and that certainly happened in 2011. It’s not a high risk, but it is certainly there,” Dr Lean said. “So, from a health and productivity perspective, it is very important not to delay that drench – the earlier, the better.” Dr Lean recommends producers use Cydectin Long Acting injection for sheep, which provides 91-day protection against barber’s pole worm and small brown stomach worm and up to 49-day persistent activity against black scour worm. “In a season like this, you will generally get worm pick-up after the first summer drench in November or December,” Dr Lean explained. “That is where Cydectin Long Acting injection for sheep is brilliant, because the alternative is to drench more frequently throughout the summer which increases the chance of worm resistance. So, you are better giving Cydectin Long Acting injection for sheep and having persistent control with less drenching.” Sheep Product Manager for Virbac Australia, Terrance Loughlin, agrees that an early long acting treatment is critical this year. “Because the season is late, some producers might delay their first summer drench, however this will mean that pastures stay contaminated for longer. Pasture contamination creates a significant risk of infection for vulnerable sheep such as weaners and hoggets. Obviously, the best way to minimise risk is to minimise contamination,” said Loughlin. Loughlin says a Cydectin Long Acting injection can negate the need for a second summer drench in the southern regions, which is particularly valuable following a wet winter. “Sheep producers in predominantly summer rainfall areas are quite familiar with the use of Cydectin Long Acting Injection for Sheep as a summer drench. Barber’s pole worm is of particular concern in northern NSW and southern Queensland sheep producers and they find that because Cydectin Long Acting is especially potent it is an important asset for combating barber’s pole worm,” said Loughlin. Dr Lean said drenching sheep for worms is a good investment. An MLA study looking at the costs of internal parasites showed that 80% of the costs of worms is in lost production most of which is not readily identifiable[1]. “Sheep aren’t worth $1.50 anymore – they are worth at least $150 a head and any reduction in productivity or increase in mortality risk is costly. So it is very profitable to keep sheep alive and healthy. Any delay of the first summer drench is really dicing with death,” Dr Lean said. “Clearly the game has changed a bit and it’s probably worth reminding people that livestock is worth a lot of money and they are grossing a lot of money. So the stakes are a lot bigger to do the job right.” Ends. For more information contact: Adam Arndell C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au [1] https://www.mla.com.au/research-and-development/search-rd-reports/final-report-details/Animal-Health-and-Biosecurity/Priority-list-of-endemic-diseases-for-the-red-meat-industries/2895 Virbac Australia's Commercial Manager recognised as a finalist in the 2016 Telstra NSW Business Women's Award 2016-09-27T02:47:04Z virbac-australia-s-commercial-manager-recognised-as-a-finalist-in-the-2016-telstra-nsw-business-women-s-award Virbac Australia’s Commercial Manager, Sarah Hunter has been named as a finalist in the 2016 NSW Telstra Business Awards. The highly sought after Awards not only recognise Australia’s most exceptional business women but are a symbol of business excellence. John Embling, General Manager Virbac Australia said: “Sarah is one of the most senior women in the $1Bn animal health market in Australia and her selection as a finalist in these Awards is a fitting accolade and we are thrilled that her contribution to the industry has been given the recognition it deserves.” With experience spanning two decades and two continents, Sarah says she sees her role as a finalist as an opportunity to promote Australian agriculture - and animal health - as a vibrant and exciting industry in which to build a career. “I am a proud Agricultural Science graduate from the University of Sydney and I love to showcase the myriad – and sometimes not immediately obvious – pathways that exist for those whose passion is for agriculture and veterinary science,” she said. “It is also great to show the way in which progressive leadership and business approaches fit naturally with creative problem-solving - a cornerstone of both agricultural and veterinary innovation” she added. Since joining Virbac Australia in 2004, Sarah and her team have been unlocking value at all levels by asking, “why not?” and breaking new ground in the way they do business and she says, anyone can do it. “All you need is to be prepared to test yourself, back yourself and not be afraid to tread a different path to everyone else.” Sarah is a finalist in the Corporate and Private Award category and will attend the Gala Dinner at Doltone House in Pyrmont on 11 October 2016 where the 2016 Telstra NSW Business Women’s Award winners will be announced. “We wish Sarah every success at the Awards and hope to see her contend the national award next month,” said John. Ends. AUSTRALIAN BEEF PRODUCER, JACK'S CREEK RETAINS THE WORLD'S BEST STEAK TITLE 2016-09-22T23:56:49Z australian-beef-producer-jack-s-creek-retains-the-world-s-best-steak-title The competition was tougher than ever with 17 countries and 83 of the world’s top beef producers entering the competition Held in London last night in a bid to win the title. The Jack's Creek winning steak came from a Wagyu F2+ 75% aged for 30 months and grain fed with judges noting it won on it's all round top quality. Patrick Warmoll, managing director of Jack's creek said of the win, “We spent considerable time selecting the entry and this win confirms that we’re the best in the world again. Winning last year was one of the biggest things to happen to us and our brand awareness rocketed and it’s been great for business. This is as much a win for Australia as it is for us.” He also added. “We will be going for the hat trick next year!” Chair of judges and butcher Keith Boxley said, “Every gold medal winner was worthy of winning the top prize but the overall winner was outstanding. It scored highly on appearance, quality, taste and tenderness.” He also added, “People are getting more selective about the meat they eat and they want something more prepared. As a butcher judging this competition, I'm looking for something that looks and tastes nice that has no gristle.” Jack’s Creeks’ award winning beef can be found in many of Australia’s top restaurants including, ARIA, black by EZARD, Catalina, LuMi Bar and Dining and many more. ARIA restaurant Head Chef Ben Turner commented that, “Jack’s Creek beef is always a consistent and tasty product” and Catalina’s Executive Chef, Mark Axisa, commented: "Jack's Creek beef is of the highest quality and the fullest flavour. It is a pleasure having the Jack's Creek dry-aged ribeye on my menu; it just flies out the door!" Jack’s Creeks’ 150+ days Grain Fed 100% black angus also won the Silver award. For more information on Jack’s Creek, interviews with Patrick Warmoll and images, please contact Annabel Carroll at Polkadot PR 02 9281 4190 / annabel@polkadotpr.com.au About Jack’s Creek Jack’s Creek is still regarded as a relative newcomer in the world of specialist beef after launching in 2000. However, in 1947 the Warmoll Family began farming in Breeza and the company’s links to fine food dates back to 1852, when the Warmoll Family emigrated from Ireland before opening butcher’s shops in the Victorian and NSW gold fields. The company is family run by co-founders and brothers, Philip and David Warmoll and sons Patrick Warmoll, MD and Robert Warmoll. Jack’s Creek is at the forefront of Australian premium beef production – processing and marketing grain fed Wagyu and Black Angus, which it ships to more than 20 destinations around the world including Japan, Saudi Arabia, China and the Germany. Key nutritional factors to consider for sheep at weaning time 2016-09-09T03:45:40Z key-nutritional-factors-to-consider-for-sheep-at-weaning-time As we head into this critical time of year – weaning time, sheep producers are being reminded of the importance nutrition plays in managing stress and easing transition for both ewes and lambs. Terrance Loughlin, Sheep Product Manager for Virbac Australia says one of the most important factors for sheep producers to consider during this time is managing trace minerals in weaners. 2015 Farmer of the year finalist, Mr Paul Routley, agrees a trace mineral top up at weaning time is critical in keeping his lambs healthy and balanced, and he is a big supporter of MULTIMIN (Copper-Free) to help achieve this. Paul and his wife, Dalles Routley, run ‘Almondvale’ near Urana in the Riverina with their family. On their 2230 hectares, the Routleys run about 1300 hectares of cereal and pulse crops, and the balance is for 500 poll ewes joined to White Suffolks for prime lamb production, 1500 poll stud ewes joined to Bond and Poll Merino rams, and 650 stud White Suffolk ewes joined to White Suffolk rams. “We’ve been using MULTIMIN (Copper-Free) for many years,” says Paul. “We always like to give our prime lambs a shot at marking, and our self-replacing lambs get a shot at weaning, just to keep them balanced.” “Most of the time, we can get half to two thirds of our prime lambs off as suckers straight from their mothers. Last year we sold lambs at 15 weeks old at an average of 25.8 kg carcass weight. MULTIMIN (Copper-Free) helps give them a real boost there,” says Paul. Latest research into mineral science has found that livestock exhibit performance benefits as a result of a rapid and balanced trace mineral top up, even in areas absent of trace mineral deficiencies. MULTIMIN (Copper-Free), delivered by a simple injection, provides a rapidly absorbed, and much needed top-up of zinc, manganese, and selenium that will help weaners transition off their mothers reducing the effects of stress and ensuring they have a strong immunity. “By keeping lambs balanced with MULTIMIN (Copper-Free), you can keep the animal healthy. If they are healthy and balanced when they are weaned, they’ll stay on that plane of growth and they will utilise feed that they’ve got, far better than if they’re sulking and sitting in the corner,” Paul said. The economic losses associated with weaning, and the effects of separation stress during weaning, which can see lambs food intake drop and subsequently reduce mineral intake from pasture and other sources, can have a dramatic impact on early growth performance which can have a flow-on effect for the lambs long-term growth potential. Paul who is also the President of the Australian Bond Sheep Breeders Association and NSW President of the White Suffolk Breeders Group, says there’s no question about the benefits of trace mineral top up at weaning with MULTIMIN (Copper-Free). “I spend a lot of time judging at sheep shows and mentoring agricultural students and I always recommend MULTIMIN for weaners. It’s a very, very good investment.” “There’s a lot of people that run sheep and there’s people that live and breathe sheep. For me, there’s nothing better than going out and seeing a mob of sheep healthy and running around happy.” Mr Loughlin highlights the other key factors for sheep producers to consider during weaning include monitoring weights and condition scores, managing the available food on offer (FOO) and the use of supplementary feeding as required. “Condition scoring sheep is an easy and accurate method of estimating the condition or ‘nutritional wellbeing’ of your sheep flock. It requires an assessment of the amount of muscle and fat covering the backbone and the short ribs of each sheep and gives a picture of the sheep’s store of energy,” says Mr Loughlin. Condition scoring a mob at key times throughout the year gives producers important information to make better management decisions in order to reach condition score targets for joining, lambing, weaning and selling. For optimum production and profitability, weaners should be no less than a score of 2 and ewes should not be allowed to fall below 2.5 by weaning. Weighing weaners on a regular basis also allows you to assess the growth rates, and distinguish animals that need drafting off for special treatment and the need for supplementation. With monitoring the available food on offer, the close association between growth rate, bodyweight and mortality risk means that supplementary feeding may be a cost-effective option in weaners. “Small increases in weaning weight can greatly improve weaner survival,” says Mr Loughlin. “For instance, studies have shown a 14 kg weaner has a 34% lower risk of death than a 12 kg weaner, and a 20 kg weaner has a 22% lower risk of death than an 18 kg weaner.” Where supplementary feeding is being used, care must be taken to ensure the provision of a balanced diet that is economically feasible. “To maintain good rumen function and assist good animal health, supplementary feeding should satisfy the animals need for protein, energy, roughage and minerals,” says Mr Loughlin. “A high energy diet based on grain may require the addition of roughage, such as hay, to ensure good rumen function. Where cereal grains are used ground lime stone should be added at the rate of 1%.” For weaners, Mr Loughlin advises early selection of paddocks is a critical component of managing weaner performance and explains that ideal weaning paddocks should include high quality feed. “For mixed perennial pastures short green feed should be 1,200 – 1,500 Kg DM/ha, ideally with improved pasture species and 20% legume. Annual clover based pastures should be around 2000-2500 Kg DM/ha food on offer and in the cereal zone consider a special purpose fodder crop or good quality stubble.” “They should also have low grass seed infestation, such as barley grass or corkscrew and good quality, easily accessible water,” he added. For Paul and Dalles Routley, running a high quality registered sheep breeding stud means their prime lambs and self-replacing lambs have to be at their nutritional best. “Our weaners just bounce away, and the growth post-weaning, its right where we want them going year after year,” says Paul. To purchase MULTIMIN (Copper-Free), visit your local agricultural merchandiser. For more information, visit Virbac Australia’s website www.virbac.com.au Ends. For more information contact: Adam Arndell C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au