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Research Proves that Promotional Giveaway Products Increase Brand Recognition by up to 71%



Imagepak Marketing, promotional products firm from Perth, tells why promotional products provide some of the largest ROI in the advertising industry.

Purveyors of promotional products tend to be very enthusiastic when telling prospective customers of the benefits of giving away small products with a company name or logo, but few take the time to provide research to back it up. Imagepak Marketing has found various research studies done at major universities in the US which tell exactly how effective promotional products can be.

In 2006, Louisiana State University and the University of Texas at San Antonio conducted a joint study on promotional products. They compared the effectiveness of promotional products in comparison with other forms of advertising, and also explored the effects of promotional products when used in combination with other techniques.

When compared to television ads, users preferred promotional products over TV ads in five different metrics. 41% had positive attitudes about the advertising with promotional products, as opposed to 18% from the TV ad. 20% had a positive attitude about the product as opposed to 16% with the TV ad. 54% thought that the promotional product gave the advertised product credibility, as opposed to 33% with the TV ad. 25% intended to make a purchase, as opposed to 17% on the TV ad. 26% said they would recommend the product, as opposed to 16% from the TV ad.

When promotional products were added to the media mix, it produced up to 44% favourable attitude toward the ad. Adding promotional products to TV and print campaigns increased the perceived credibility of the ads and also the referral value. Groups who received promotional products gave more positive ratings in all categories than those who didn’t.

A 2003 study by Georgia Southern University concerning trade shows produced some of the most astounding results of any study. When trade show attendees were given a promotional product, 71.6% of them remembered the name of the product, while 76.3% said they had a favourable attitude toward the company that provided the promotional product.

Vendors got a return of 23% visiting their booths by sending a mailer only. When they added a refrigerator magnet, 36% visited the booth. When a T-shirt offer was included, 41% visited the booth.

L.J. Market research polled Business travellers at the Dallas Fort Worth Airport concerning promotional products. 76.1% said they could remember the name of an advertiser who gave them a product in the previous six months, but only 53.5% could remember the name of a company they had seen in a magazine or newspaper during the previous week.

Scott Eaton, owner of Imagepak Marketing, says the results are consistent with the feedback he has received from his clients: “This is no surprise to me. I have known that promotional products work for a long time. Think about it: if you give a coffee cup to a customer, that customer sees your name every time he or she takes a sip or pours a cup of coffee. The return on investment is huge, because people like and voluntarily use promotional items, where they tend to tune out a lot of other forms of advertising.”

Eaton concluded, “Customers and prospects see your name or logo numerous times every day on a promotional item. That is the least expensive and most effective form of advertising I can think of.”

Imagepak Marketing has a wide range of promotional items, and serves Perth and Australia-wide. Their promotional products and corporate gifts include silicone wristbands, Javacup, stubby holders, corporate wear, and many more.

To see a full list of their products, visit their website: http://www.imagepak.com.au/about-us/ or call them at 08 92444 111.