| Share

AN AUDIENCE WITH DR RICHARD HAMES IN MELBOURNE AND SYDNEY



FORBES NAMED HAMES ONE OF THE SMARTEST PEOPLE ON THE PLANET

CHINA! WE HAVE FOUND THE ENEMY AND IT IS US!

 Global futurist Dr Richard Hames will deliver a one hour seminar on Australian Business and the Prospects for Future Prosperity from 11am to 12 noon on Thursday August 29 in Melbourne and Friday August 30 in Sydney. One of the topics he will cover in these exclusive intelligence briefings is how Australia needs to reframe its relationship with China for mutual benefit.

 Dr Hames says  “We live in the Chinese Century. Some still do not accept that. China is our largest trading partner. It represents almost one third of all Australian exports, including coal, oil, iron ore and agricultural goods. It also provides access to some of the largest markets in the world. Yet China’s trade with Australia is just 1% of its total market activity.”

 Forbes magazine named Richard Hames “one of the smartest people on the planet.” He correctly anticipated 9/11, the GFC, the Arab Spring, Trump’s election and the success of the first iPod and Tesla electric cars. 

 An Audience with Dr Richard Hames will feature Dr Hames delivering remarks for 30 minutes followed by an extensive 30 minute Q & A session with the audience. Theatre style seating . Doors open at 10.30am. Strictly limited number of tickets available.

Tickets are $50 from Eventbrite.com.au

Melbourne Thursday 29th August 11am to 12noon Intercontinental Melbourne 495 Collins St Melbourne CBD. Melbourne http://eventbrite.com.au/e/66289602987   
Sydney Friday 30th August 11am to 12 noon City Tattersalls Club 198 Pitt St Sydney CBD.
Sydney http://eventbrite.com.au/e/66291131559

 
TO INTERVIEW DR HAMES email max@marksonsparks.com or call Max Markson 0412501601

ABOUT THE EVENT Using the benefits of AI scanning, with analysis from over 3,000 trusted sources from around the world, Dr. Hames will share unique insights with his audience as to how they can use disruption to their advantage; apply the latest technologies to innovate at a whole-system level; spot uncommon opportunities in Asia (even as the Australia-China relationship becomes more adverse); enrich employee engagement; and develop more relevant leadership literacies.

ABOUT CHINA & AUSTRALIA ……WE HAVE FOUND THE ENEMY AND IT IS US

 

REFRAMING AUSTRALIAN-CHINESE RELATIONSHIPS FOR MUTUAL BENEFIT

Dr Hames says  “We live in the Chinese Century. Some still do not accept that. China is our largest trading partner. It represents almost one third of all Australian exports, including coal, oil, iron ore and agricultural goods. It also provides access to some of the largest markets in the world. Yet China’s trade with Australia is just 1% of its total market activity.”

 

Rapidly rising incomes and the mass migration from the countryside to the cities created a large class of urban consumers demanding better housing, a clean environment, overseas travel, improved education, a more nutritious diet and an enhanced choice of financial and other services.

 

The key to future business success is understanding what problems plague China; what issues the Chinese government has identified (e.g. aged care, environmental pollution); what other opportunities are emerging (e.g. health and skincare products, supplementary education, direct marketing, legal services); and what solutions can be uniquely provided by Australian expertise (e.g. small-scale organic food farming, ecological services).

 

The biggest drawbacks to an expansion of trade with China are (i) cultural imperialism, successive Australian governments viewing China through the increasingly obsolete lens of empire, and (ii) our subsequent caution about engaging with China as an equal partner in global societal development. That caution, along with a defense strategy devised and led by the US (aimed primarily at securing its own interests, which do notnecessarily coincide with ours) lock us out of contention for new markets.

 

How? China is Australia's largest source of international students. But student visas can be instantly wound back. Beef exports can be replaced by agreements already in place with Argentina. Even now inflows of capital to Australia are curtailed...

 

Australia’s trading relationship with China over the next decade depends upon two factors. They go unheeded today. Yet both, working in tandem, are key:

 

1. PERSPECTIVE – Australian views about China are inherited relics from the past. Changing our ingrained assumptions about China – its political system, role in the world, and legitimate aspirations – is therefore critical.

 

2. EMPATHY - China has lifted its position in the world economy by bringing millions of its citizens out of poverty and promoting small businesses to generate income. Today China can totally replace Australian imports if it wants to. But hailing their extraordinary achievements, and working cooperatively with China, will inevitably benefit Australian enterprises wanting to do business there in the long term.

 

Richard Hames – Centre for the Future. August 2019