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Tech Device Offers Entertainment Without the Screen Dramas: G-mee Play delivers balanced road trip entertainment these holidays



55% of Australians are planning a road trip this year and with the Easter school holidays beginning soon, experts in child focussed technology and behaviour are warning parents of the dangers of screen time during travel and suggesting a change in the device they offer their kids. 

 

Aussie developed G-mee Play is one device that allows kids of today to enjoy the portable entertainment experiences their parents once enjoyed, without the dangers of excess screen time. 

 

Meet two Aussie dads working together and using their expertise to help families find the balance for meaningful screen time, just in time for the holidays.

 

Brad Marshall is The Unplugged Psychologist who says that COVID-19 has changed the relationship that young children (4-14 years) have with technology. He also says that school holidays can be one of the most difficult times to manage screen use in a family, especially when there are long stretches of travel or a road trip involved. 

 

“In my experience parents set out with an ideal plan in their head around limiting kids screen use so they can reconnect with each other, but when the stress of travel hits, that all flies out the window,” Mr Marshall explains.

 

“I’m sure there are plenty of parents who thought they would just use the tablet or phone for small bursts in the car, and before you know it it’s a screaming match in the hotel foyer or restaurant as your kids are glued to the screen.” 

 

“The G-mee Play allows kids to downtime through music or audio books without the visual rabbit hole that can detract from the human experiences of the quintessential Aussie family holiday,” Mr Marshall commented.

 

Charlie Brown is the tech expert and father behind the Aussie innovation, G-mee Play – a smart device that was created with young users – and their parents - in mind. 

 

For families with young digital users (5-14 years), G-mee Play encourages auditory forms of entertainment so that young eyes can see more of the world around them to enjoy a more balanced relationship with technology on the road and in life.

 

“Parents all remember their portable cassette and CD players, and how they were entertained on family trips. G-mee Play offers kids these entertainment experiences but delivers them via apps that are approved by their parents, like streaming music, podcasts, audio books and mindfulness exercises” said Mr Brown. 

 

“There’s so much to see on a road trip, and the G-mee Play encourages kids to use their ears for entertainment, and while doing so, they are also seeing nature, different towns and landmarks as they travel with their family.”

 

“With the G-mee Play, kids can have a personal entertainment experience and parents can allow or not allow the apps accessed on the journey by using the built in pin lock parental controls. This creates a managed adventure for the kids within the approved apps accessible on the device. By selecting audio entertainment apps only, the whole family can be entertained, but their eyes will be free to look elsewhere.”

 

The G-mee Play smart player RRP is $99.95 and available via g-mee.com, Amazon.com.au, ebay.com.au, catch.com.au. 

 

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES: 

  • Charlie Brown, G-mee Play creator and father, discusses how parents can take back the power of kids’ technology use on road trips for a more meaningful journey. 
  • Brad Marshall, The Unplugged Psychologist, discusses the technology pitfalls parents may fall into during holiday road trips and how to avoid arguing with kids about technology use. 

 

For more information on G-mee, visit www.g-mee.com

 

ENDS

 

Editor’s Note: 

 

For further information, imagery and media enquiries contact:

Maria Crema, Crema PR, m: 0402 239 929, e: maria@cremapr.com.au 

 

More information:

 

Kids and cyber safety

  • In 2020, just under half (46%) of Australian children aged 6 to 13 used a mobile phone, up from 41% in 2015(4). 
  • In the 14-17 age bracket, 9 in 10 Australian teens have a mobile phone(5).  
  • Interestingly, nearly 6 in 10 young people (8-17 years) who reported a negative experience online, identified emotional and/or psychological impacts as a result(2).
  • A majority (94%) of parents identify their child's online safety as a priority, however parents lack confidence in dealing with certain negative online experiences their child may face, such as cyberbullying and online threats(3).

 

Sources:

  1. Tourism Australia research
  2. Office of the eSafety Commissioner – State of Play – Youth, kids and digital dangers
  3. eSafety Research Parenting Digital Age
  4. ACMA – Kids and mobiles: How Australian children are using mobile phones
  5. Roy Morgan Single Source Australia, July 2015 – June 2016