The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-11-06T23:26:30Z Grid soil mapping helps farmers manage variability across multiple soil properties 2019-11-06T23:26:30Z grid-soil-mapping-helps-farmers-manage-variability-across-multiple-soil-properties The benefits of grid soil mapping in developing targeted strategies to address individual soil properties have been highlighted by a recent research project, conducted by Precision Agriculture Pty Ltd. The project investigated the use of grid soil mapping to measure a variety of surface soil chemical properties, and also explored the relationships between different soil characteristics observed in the grid mapped data. Over a 12-month period in 2018, Precision Agriculture tested and mapped approximately 100,000 hectares of agricultural land across New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania. Principal Scientist with Precision Agriculture, Dr Kirsten Barlow, said results from 289 paddocks – almost 10,000 grid soil samples -where multiple soil properties were measured, were used in this project. “The grid soil sampling divides each paddock into small grids, generally a two-hectare grid, although this varies across industries,” Dr Barlow said. “We collected 0-10cm soil cores within each grid on a diagonal transect that zig-zagged through the paddock, with the samples then sent to a commercial, accredited laboratory for analysis. “The soil tests varied notably between and within each paddock.” Soil pH – the acidity or alkalinity of the soil – generally had the lowest variation, while Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC), which influences the ability of the soil to supply plant nutrients (calcium, magnesium and potassium) and Exchangeable Sodium Percentage (ESP) had the greatest variability within a paddock. The investigation into the relationships between the different soil tests also revealed wide variations. While some soil characteristics such as pH and CEC were well correlated in some paddocks, for most other characteristics up to 75% of paddocks had no consistent trends between the soil test data. Dr Barlow said soil acidity and sodicity are common constraints limiting crop performance, which can be addressed through variable rate applications of lime and gypsum, while nutrients such as phosphorus can be more strategically targeted through variable rate fertiliser applications. “Grid soil mapping provides a comprehensive measure of the variation in soil properties across the paddock,” Dr Barlow said. “Where multiple soil properties are measured, separate, more targeted, variable rate strategies can be developed for each soil constraint to ameliorate individual soil properties.” Further details on the results of the study can be found at: https://precisionagriculture.com.au/grid-soil-mapping-defines-the-variability-in-multiple-soil-properties/ Veterinarian offers production advice to Young farmers looking to rebuild stock numbers. 2019-11-04T21:35:40Z veterinarian-offers-production-advice-to-young-farmers-looking-to-rebuild-stock-numbers While Australia’s sheep industry may be facing its smallest sheep flock on record, strong lamb prices are making this an ideal time for farmers to begin rebuilding depleted stocks. Designed to improve the knowledge and understanding of how producers can increase lambing rates and share insights into the latest reproductive science, Virbac Australia recently held a pre-joining information day in Young, NSW headlined by Dr John Webb Ware, Senior Livestock Consultant at the University of Melbourne. Attendees had the chance to learn about important nutritional and management considerations to help them achieve an increased lambing rate and were also informed about Virbac’s fecundity vaccine which has been identified as a key component to boost lamb numbers. As Dr Webb Ware explains, “Ovastim is a practical and economical method to help increase lamb production. The vaccine directly influences a ewe’s fecundity, increasing the number of eggs available for fertilisation by immunising the animal against the hormone androstenedione, which alters ovarian function. That, in turn, leads to an increase in the number of twin births, which is an important factor in boosting lamb numbers.” With high stock prices, reproductive efficiency is an important determinant of the profitability of most sheep enterprises – and Dr Webb Ware goes on to explain how Ovastim can increase lambing rates primarily through an increase in the number of twin births. “With good management practices, more lambs on the ground will result in improved sales, to further benefit a producer’s bottom line.” With 14 local sheep producers attending Wednesday’s event, sheep producer Marty Corcoran from Boorowa described the event as a great opportunity to learn more about nutritional and management considerations to improve lambing rates. "The Ovastim information morning was highly insightful in how farmers can manage the reproductive performance of their sheep flock. Nutritional management prior to joining and the cost efficiency of maintaining ewe condition through the dry were two key messages from the morning. I use Ovastim and have successfully increased our lambing percentages by 20-30% in our 1st X-ewes flock which has seen us push industry benchmarks,” Marty said. For Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager, Emily Fowler, the event was a unique opportunity for attendees to ask questions specific to their production systems, and learn from a leader in the field. “This was a truly unique chance to learn the latest in reproductive and fertility science, and we’re thrilled to hear the positive responses from attendees.” For Dr Webb Ware, the benefits are undeniable. “If well managed, Ovastim can have a tremendously positive impact on high yielding lamb production systems for the rapid breeding of replacement stock.” To find out more about Ovastim, visit au.virbac.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo caption: Local sheep producer, Marty Corcoran with Virbac Australia representative Dr George Cox Local sheep producer, Marty Corcoran with Virbac Australia representative Emily Fowler Target Sheep event tours New South Wales offering key insights in the fight against worms. 2019-10-31T22:53:11Z target-sheep-event-tours-new-south-wales-offering-key-insights-in-the-fight-against-worms With summer drenching season fast approaching, leading animal health company Virbac Australia has just wrapped up a roadshow throughout regional New South Wales, educating producers on parasite management, with a special focus on current drench resistance levels in the Cootamundra, Gundagai and Tamworth regions. Virbac’s Target Sheep animal health initiative is aimed at optimising the health and performance of livestock at three key stages of the production cycle; pre-joining, pre-lambing and marking/weaning. These events focused on how to increase productivity by managing worm resistance with an effective drench program. The program brings together industry experts, veterinarians and producers to improve on-farm productivity and profitability through leading animal health management practices and industry benchmarks. Key speakers at recent events included Veterinary Parasitology Consultant, Dr Tim Elliott and Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager’s, Emily Fowler, Adrian Whitehead and Andrew Mulligan. Tim’s presentation educated producers about worm biology and their life cycle, with tips on pasture management and drench strategies to reduce the risk of internal parasites specific to the region. “A summer drench at this time of year needs to be a very effective drench to ensure a successful reduction in worm burden,” said Tim. “Weaned lambs are highly susceptible to worms, but effective drenching helps to increase weaner growth rates. For all these reasons, this first summer drench is of vital importance, so farmers can remove the worm burden in individual livestock, reduce pasture contamination from worms and allow for healthier weaners over summer.” During the Gundagai event, Adrian Whitehead explained the importance of a pre-summer drench and how to develop the right summer drench program for your property. “With resistance to treatment becoming an increasing problem, the summer drench farmers choose can make a huge difference in the success of any worm control program. For these reasons, farmers must choose a potent and persistent solution that protects stock against infection and boosts sheep wellbeing and productivity, for healthier, more profitable farms. Tim’s presentation really highlighted the need for all sheep producers to carry out regular worm tests and be aware of the resistance levels on their farm as no two farms are the same.” Around 20 local sheep producers attended the Gundagai event, and Tony Engel from “Cascade”, South West Slopes NSW described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn how to identify resistance to drenches and how to best manage it. Tim’s presentation allowed me to understand how resistance can occur and it is important to be on the front foot. Adrian Whitehead from Virbac will come out to do some drench resistance testing on my weaners which will be very informative, and I will use that information to select the right drenches for my property.” With drought conditions still a major issue across much of NSW, Adrian Whitehead explained now is not the time to be complacent in worm management programs. “We encouraged all attendees to continue monitoring their sheep and carry out regular worm egg tests as we approach summer”. “Hopefully this has been a useful discussion for the group, and it’s given them some useful information to now go out and act on.” Virbac will be hosting further Target Sheep events throughout Australia in the coming months. For more information, visit https://au.virbac.com, follow Virbac Australia on Facebook or Instagram or call 1800 242 100. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo caption: Target Sheep Cootamundra event presentation Local producer's sheep Rodeo 4 Life Announces Elite Bull Riding Superstars in Australia’s Richest Bull Ride Rodeo Spectacular! 2019-10-23T02:47:36Z rodeo-4-life-announces-elite-bull-riding-superstars-in-australia-s-richest-bull-ride-rodeo-spectacular MEDIA RELEASE: 23 October 2019  “Rodeo 4 Life” Announces Elite Bull Riding Superstars in Australia’s Richest Bull Ride Rodeo Spectacular! Today, Rodeo 4 Life announced its line-up of elite bull riding champions* who’ll thrill audiences when Australia’s richest bull ride and country music arena spectacular explodes at WIN Entertainment Centre, Wollongong on Saturday 30 November to help save lives! In an Australian first, Rodeo 4 Life combines electrifying rodeo sports entertainment starring Australia’s toughest bull riding champions from across Australia with a full length live concert by seven-time Golden Guitar winner and back-to-back CMC Male Artist of the Year, Travis Collins, performing some of his greatest hits. Rodeo 4 Life will be a thrilling night of entertainment featuring a star-studded line-up of bull riding daredevil cowboys who’ll fight the odds to stay mounted for the full 8 seconds on the legendary JP Gill and Sons’ mightiest rodeo bulls as they compete for the championship title and a whopping $30,000 in prize money! Rodeo 4 Life’s cowboy line-up includes bull riding superstars Cliff Richardson (NSW), Troy Wilkinson (NSW), Wade McCarthy (WA), Mathew Bee (QLD), Troy Cross (NSW) and Toby Collins (VIC) who’ll be going for gold to take home the Rodeo 4 Life inaugural title and the grand prize! But these bull riding legends won’t have an easy ride! They’ll be challenged by young gun cowboys already with a string of titles under their belts including; Wyatt Milgate (QLD), Sam Woodall (VIC), Joe Down (VIC), Bryden Atkins (VIC) and Ty Thomson (QLD) - all aiming to smash records to win the Rodeo 4 Life title and the pot of gold! Producer Doug Vickers OAM, a long-time rodeo man who’s produced many large-scale rodeo events across Australia said, “We’re thrilled to have such a fine line up of champions in this spectacular event that will keep the audience on the ‘edge of their seats’ when Rodeo 4 Life rocks The Gong in a thrilling, action-packed night of electrifying live rodeo and country music entertainment.” While Rodeo 4 Life will be exhilarating, Australia’s bull riding champions won’t just be bucking for the grand prize when they burst from chutes on powerful  bulls in the ride of their lives; they’ll risk all by ‘riding for a greater cause’ – to raise bucks that can save lives through funding organ transplant research at the RPA Transplant Institute (RPATI). Champion cowboy Troy Wilkinson who currently holds the highest bull riding score in Australia with a record of 93 and the titles of 2015 APRA Bull Riding Champion, 2017 PBR Australia Champion and 2017 PBR World Finals Qualifier, said, “Rodeo 4 Life will be massive and the competition as tough as it gets!” “We’ll all be riding our hearts out for this important cause and hoping to bring home the grand prize in Australia’s richest bull riding rodeo arena spectacular.” Rodeo 4 Life producer Doug Vickers is more than a businessman, he’s also a grateful RPA liver transplant recipient who’s doing much more than setting the bar high for Australian rodeo sports entertainment; he’s also increasing awareness of organ donation and funding essential life-saving organ transplant research with 100% of profits dedicated to research conducted at the RPATI. Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPA) has long been Australia’s pioneers in organ transplant research and surgery having saved thousands of lives through developing breakthroughs to benefit all Australians. Thanks to the funds raised from Rodeo 4 Life, the RPATI will be able to continue with the development of a world first organ perfusion system that will be able to extend organ viability from the current length of just a few hours to become viable for several days. This will allow more organs to be made available for transplant and a greater number of Australian lives to be saved. “Rodeo 4 Life champion bull riders and the audience will be part of something that’s so much more than a night of exciting entertainment - they’ll have the time of their lives while giving seriously ill people time to live,” Mr Vickers said. “By promoting the need to register to become an organ donor and funding this vital research at RPATI, we’ll be increasing the number of organs that can be transplanted and together we’ll save more lives,” he said. Travis Collins, who’s well known for his tireless fundraising efforts by dedicating his talents to causes close to his heart to help others said, “It’s an incredible honour to perform at Rodeo 4 Life. While music, song writing, recording and performing is my life, there is something very special about being part of something bigger that has the power to save the lives of many.” Book now at Ticketmaster www.bit.ly/RFL-BOOK or rodeo4life.com.au. -ENDS- *Full list of Rodeo 4 Life Bull riding champions on page 3.   MEDIA CONTACTS INTERVIEW REQUESTS Insight Communications on: 02 9518 4744 INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES 1.      Rodeo 4 Life Champion Cowboys 2.      Doug Vickers OAM - Rodeo 4 Life producer and RPA Liver transplant recipient 3.      Travis Collins - Seven-time Golden Guitar winner and back-to-back CMC Male Artist of the Year 4.      John ‘Happy” Gill of JP Gill & Sons – Rodeo 4 Life stock contractor   RODEO 4 LIFE LINKS 1.      Rodeo 4 Life Website: https://rodeo4life.com.au/ 2.      Rodeo 4 Life Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rodeo4lifeau/ 3.      BOOK NOW at Ticketmaster: http://bit.ly/RFL-BOOK 4.      Organ Donor Register: https://donatelife.gov.au/   RODEO 4 LIFE MEDIA CENTRE – DOWNLOADS 1.      Photographs of spokespersons, cowboys, rodeo images and bulls can be downloaded here: http://bit.ly/RFL-Media     JOURNALIST NOTES RODEO 4 LIFE CHAMPION BULL RIDERS (IN ALPHA ORDER) 1.      Ben Atkins from Tongala, Victoria, is a long-time crowd pleaser in bull riding competitions and was a NFR Finalist in both 2007 and 2008. 2.      Bryden Atkins from Chiltern, Victoria, was 2 time APRA Junior Bull Riding Champion and 2009 NRCA Junior Bull Riding Champion. Bryden also holds the 2014, 2015, 2016 RSA Woodalls Series Ride-Tuff Bull Riding Champion title and was a 2015 United Bucking Bulls inc. (UBBI) World Series Qualifier. Bryden’s been an APRA Bull Riding Qualifier multiple times and his recent wins at Barooga and Chiltern APRA Pro-Rodeos. 3.      Mathew Bee from Tarome, Queensland, won the title of RSA Ridetuff Series Rookie Bull Riding Champion in 2014 and 2015. In 2015 he was the RSA Rookie Bull Riding Champion and in 2016 and 2018 he took the title of NRCA Australian Bull Riding Champion. 4.      Brumby Brandenburg from Bloomsbury, QLD will be looking to take home his first bull riding title when he takes on some of Australia’s champions at Rodeo 4 Life. 5.      Joey Buckingham from Mossman Queensland, holds the titles of 2017 Great Northern Bull Riding Series Rookie Champion and 2016 Mareeba Rodeo Novice Bull Ride Winner. In 2015 he was an ABCRA NQ Zone Qualifier and in 2014 he was an Australian High School Rodeo Finals Qualifie 6.      Sam Champ from Meldale, Queensland holds the title of 2015 APRA Sunshine Circuit Bull Riding Champion. 7.      Toby Collins from Maldon, Victoria is the 2018 Cloverdale Bull Riding Champion, a 2016 (PRCA) Texas Circuit Finals Qualifier and in 2011 he won the title of APRA Rookie Bull Riding and Saddle Bronc Champion! 8.      Troy Cross from Boorowa NSW, has been a national finals qualifier six times and holds the title of 2009 Christchurch New Zealand World International Winner.  9.      Jonathan Couling from Singleton NSW, holds the 2014 and 2017 East to West Coast Bull Riding Champion titles and was a WRA and LRA Bull Riding Finalist in 2016 in Alberta Canada. 10.   Sam Daly from Cobden, Victoria has a string of rodeo titles to his name including 2010 and 2011 RSA Junior Steer Riding Champion, 2012 SCRS Rookie Bull Riding Champion and the 2016 Ride Tough Woodall Series Rookie Bull Riding Champion. 11.   Joe Down from Warrnambool, Victoria is a four-time Dalby Qualifier, the 2018 and 2019 APRA Rookie Bull Riding Champion. Joe holds the 2018 and 2019 RSA Rookie Bull Rider titles. 12.   Jesse Glass from Qurindi, NSW has been working the rodeo circuit since high school and was a two-time Qualifier in the RSA National Finals Bull Ride & Steer Wrestling, ABCRA NFR and was a National High School Finals Qualifier. 13.   Lane Howlett from Roma Queensland, finished in the top 10 in the 2018 APRA season and took 4th place at Mt Isa in 2018.  Lane holds the 2019 Sunshine Circuit Bull Riding Championship title. 14.   Sean Lynch from Wagga Wagga NSW, is a National Finals Qualifier in both the APRA and ABCRA Championships. 15.   Kyle Maskiell from Longford Tasmania is an RSA Champion Bull Rider. 16.   Jack McArther from Cooyar, Queensland holds the 2017 APRA Bull Riding Championship title. 17.   Wade McCarthy from Muckenburra, West Australia holds the titles of 2018 West Australian All Round Champion Cowboy, 2018 West Australian Bull Riding Champion and 2014 ABCRA Australian Bull Riding Champion. 18.   Wyatt Milgate from Biboohra, Queensland is one of Rodeo 4 Life’s youngest competitors with a string of bull riding titles to his name. Wyatt is a two-time NRCA Qualifier, a five time ABCRA Qualifier and in 2017 and 2018 he was the ABCRA NQ Zone Junior Bull Ride Champion. Wyatt holds the titles of NQRA 2018 Novice Bull Ride Champion and the 2017 and 2018 Great Northern Series Bull Ride Champion. 19.   Cliff Richardson from Gresford, NSW has represented Australia 3 times at the PBR Global Cups and qualified for the 2018 PBR Velocity Finals in Las Vegas USA. He was 2018 runner up PBR Australia Nation Champion, the 2018 PBR Australia Last Cowboy Standing Event Champion, 2018 ABCRA Runner Up Nation Bull Riding Champion, 2017 ABCRA Nation Bull Riding Champion, 2017 ABCRA Central Circuit Bull Riding Champion and in 2011 he was the ABCRA Rookie All Round Cowboy, Rookie Bull Riding Champion and Rookie Bare Back Champion. 20.   Dylan Richardson from Maffra Victoria, is one of Rodeo 4 Life’s youngest bull riders. Dylan holds the 2016 National Rodeo Council Services Australia Junior Bull Rider title and the 2019 RSA Junior Bull Rider title. 21.   Anthony Ryan from Warrnambool, Victoria holds the title of 2011 RSA Novice Bull Riding Champion. 22.   Trefor Sproule from Singleton, NSW is a 3 time ABCRA National Finals Qualifier. In 2016 he was the XTREAM Bulls Runner Up Champion and in 2010 a ABCRA Finals Round Winner. 23.   Ty Thomson from Mt Walker, Queensland holds the titles of 2012 Calf Riding Champion (NRA), 2016 Junior Bull Riding Champion (NRA) and was named Novice Bull Riding Champion (NRA) in 2018. 24.   Troy Wilkinson from Upper Horton, NSW holds the highest bull riding score in Australia with a record of 93 and the titles of 2015 APRA Bull Riding Champion, 2017 PBR Australia Champion and 2017 PBR World Finals Qualifier. 25.   Sam Woodall from Heywood, Victoria holds a number of titles including the 2018 Australian Professional Rodeo Association Rookie Bull Riding Champion, 2017 National Rodeo Council of Australia Bull Riding Champion, 2017 APRA Southern Cross Rodeo Circuit Rookie Bull Riding Champion, 2016 Rodeo Services Association 2nd Division Bull Riding Champion, 2014-16 Rodeo Services Association Junior Bull Riding Champion and 2012 - 16 RSA Woodall Rodeo Promotions Junior Bull Riding Champion.   RODEO 4 LIFE Giving the audience the time of their lives to give seriously ill people the time to live! Rodeo 4 Life on Saturday 30 November 2019, at WIN Entertainment Centre, Wollongong, is Australia’s richest bull ride spectacular with $30,000 in prize money up for grabs with seven-time Golden Guitar winner and back-to-back CMC Male Artist of the Year, Travis Collins performing live in concert. Rodeo 4 Life is the inspiration of Doug Vickers OAM, rodeo sports producer and liver transplant recipient. Rodeo 4 Life will be conducted in accordance with policies, rules and industry standards of Rodeo Services Australia (RSA), and the NSW Code of Practice for animals used in rodeo events. Rodeo 4 Life will be conducted in accordance with animal welfare standards, registration and licensing systems of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA). An RSPCA representative will be invited to be on site to oversee the event and a veterinarian will be in attendance. Whilst the event is raising funds to go toward Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Transplant Service; the hospital or Sydney Local Health District is not involved in the conduct or organisation of this event. DOUG VICKERS OAM Doug Vickers was born and raised in Townsville, North Queensland. In 1970 he joined the Australian military serving in the RAAF in Australia and overseas. In 1991, Doug Vickers was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in the Australia Day Honours List for his service to the military. In 1999, following his discharge from military service, Doug went on to teach at the National Aerospace Centre of Excellence until 2013 when he ventured into the world of business purchasing Loam and Stone Landscape supplies and establishing his engineering company which he operates today. On 23 December 2015, Doug underwent a life-saving a liver transplant at RPA. After receiving the gift of life and the lengthy recovery period that followed, Doug learned of the funding challenges faced by researchers at the RPA Transplant Institute and became passionate about creating a unique event that could generate essential funds for vital research that could save the lives of others. With a family background in rodeo sports dating back to the late 1940s and having produced many large-scale rodeo events across Australia and served on the Judges Panel for both the APRA and ABCRA Associations, Doug initiated Rodeo 4 Life to generate much needed funds to support organ transplant research at the RPA Transplant Institute.  On 8 August 2019, in an Australian first Doug Vickers OAM announced Rodeo 4 Life as Australia’s richest bull ride extravaganza and country music concert with 100% of profits dedicated to funding research at the RPA Transplant Institute. Rodeo 4 Life will be held on 30 November 2019 at WIN Entertainment Centre, Wollongong NSW. RODEO 4 LIFE ENTERTAINMENT TRAVIS COLLINS Rodeo 4 Life will star seven-time Golden Guitar winner and back-to-back CMC Male Artist of the Year, Travis Collins performing some of his greatest hits including Just Another Girl, Call Me Crazy, and Hard Light. A dynamic guitarist, vocalist and live performer, Travis Collins has established himself as a leading artist in the Australian music industry.  Travis is a multiple CMAA and CMC Award winner with a growing string of hit albums, #1 songs, awards and a decade of winning fans all across the country under his belt. Well-known for his masterful guitar playing and powerhouse vocals as he is for his depth of song-writing and high energy live performances, Travis Collins continues to cement his footprint as a mainstay on the Australian music landscape. GLEN MORGAN - RODEO ANNOUNCER Glen Morgan is a name synonymous with Australian rodeo sports. Glen rode saddle broncs for more than 15 years winning 13 Australian titles. Glen also and competed in Canada and the U.S.A in the 1980s and 1990s before retiring from championship rodeo competition to become one of the best rodeo announcers in the business. GENE MCDONALD - RODEO PROTECTION CLOWN Rodeo protection clowns are risk takers who do more than entertain the audience during bull riding rodeo sports - they put their life on the line to distract the bulls away from grounded riders.  Gene will have one of the most important and dangerous roles in the Rodeo 4 Life arena - to protect the star cowboys from the bulls when they hit the ground so they can get back to the chutes in safety. BIG AL WILSON - RODEO CLOWN It wouldn’t be a Rodeo spectacular without Big Al Wilson, Australia’s class act Rodeo Clown.  A former pro bull rider and a seasoned veteran of rodeo entertainment, Big Al Wilson has won the title of Australia’s Rodeo Clown of the Year, 15 times. For 20 years, Big Al Wilson has performed at Australia's largest rodeos including at all the National Finals in Australia and New Zealand, the National Finals for ABCRA, NRCA, APRA and NZPRA, and will be the star Clown again this year at all National Finals Rodeos.  JP GILL & SONS CHAMPION RODEO BULLS Rodeo 4 Life will star some of Australia’s mightiest rodeo bulls, bred and trained by legendary JP Gill & Sons, our official stock contractor. “Happy” John P Gill, and his sons - John, Jason and Jarrod could easily be considered Australia’s “Rodeo Royalty” with a family bloodline of western-style performers dating back to the early days of Australia’s Wild West Buck Jumping Shows. From humble beginnings JP Gill & Sons have bred a bloodline of champion rodeo bulls beginning with Dr Jekyll and 007 purchased from Noel Cook of the Running N Quarter Horse Ranch at Nathalia, Victoria.   RPA TRANSPLANT INSTITUTE The RPA Transplant Institute was founded in 2006 to promote and support transplant research projects undertaken by scientists and transplant clinicians at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPA), the University of Sydney and the Children’s Hospital at Westmead.  The RPA Transplant Institute is part of Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPA), Australia’s pioneers in kidney and liver transplantation research and surgery with organ transplantation one of the many miracles of modern medicine created at RPA. TeleSense to Expand into Australian Grain Market as Marcus Kennedy Joins Advisory Board 2019-10-22T22:14:09Z telesense-to-expand-into-australian-grain-market-as-marcus-kennedy-joins-advisory-board Sunnyvale, CA -- Oct. 2019: TeleSense announces its expansion into the Australian grain market by adding Marcus Kennedy, former Chief Development Officer (CDO) of GrainCorp, as a member of its Advisory Board.  After adoption of its stored-grain monitoring solutions in the US and EU, TeleSense is setting its sights on the Australian grain market.  Kennedy will help guide TeleSense in that process.  As CDO of Australia’s largest grain handler, GrainCorp, Kennedy brings broad commercial executive experience across the grain value chain, and has developed and implemented growth strategies in several sectors.  While at GrainCorp, Kennedy led global corporate strategy and business development, implementation, governance, and cultural change programs across the international agri-business group.  He also established and led its successful innovation program over 5 years, with investments in AgTech accelerators, VC Funds and several grain industry start-ups, including in Silicon Valley.  He also led a successful A$600m merger/integration and growth strategy to create a new business.   TeleSense plans to leverage Kennedy’s experience and knowledge of the Australian agriculture industry to expedite implementation of its grain storage solutions across the country. “Now that TeleSense is successfully deployed on-site with over 400 customers in the US and EU, Australia represents the next strategic market for us to target,” stated Naeem Zafar, TeleSense founder and CEO. “Having someone as experienced and successful as Marcus is tremendous for our initial business development and market penetration activities.” Kennedy is also excited about TeleSense’s trajectory, stating, “TeleSense is an exciting new tech company taking a refreshingly innovative approach to monitoring stored grains.  Their hardware and software products are perfectly suited for the unique challenges faced by our grain handlers in Australia and New Zealand.  I am looking forward to amplifying their current traction and expanding upon their previous international successes.” Kennedy is the latest addition to an already impressive list of industry and academic advisors. Other advisors include: Bobby Pelz, Co-founder of McDonald and Pelz Global Commodities, the world’s largest cash grains broker; Kerry Cebul, founding member of SLM Partners’ U.S. organic farmland investment and management firm; Pavel Danilov, Russia and Eastern Europe AgTech investor who previously managed Skolkovo Ventures’ AgTech fund and agricultural investments at ONEXIM Group; Alice Wheelwright, a Nabisco, Coca-Cola, and Ecolab veteran, touching all levels of communications and marketing; Dr. Seth Naeve, Professor of Agronomy at the University of Minnesota; Dr. Kenneth Hellevang: researcher at North Dakota State University in the area of grain drying, storage, and handling, focusing on post-harvest engineering; and Dr. Digvir S. Jayas, distinguished Professor and Vice President at University of Manitoba, with research focusing on stored grains. About TeleSense: TeleSense is a Silicon Valley startup digitizing the post-harvest grain supply chain. Utilizing advanced IOT sensors, we provide grain managers with actionable insights about their stored grain, so that they can make storage decisions easily, quickly, and accurately. Our easy-to-use sensors and app work together to continuously monitor grain and automatically send issue alerts to users. This helps mitigate spoilage, infestation, and grain quality degradation. TeleSense also retrofits traditional temperature cable systems to integrate them with their fully wireless software ecosystem. Better data leads to better grain, and TeleSense helps users acquire better data. Injectable trace minerals: a solution to combat livestock heat stress this summer 2019-10-20T21:00:00Z injectable-trace-minerals-a-solution-to-combat-livestock-heat-stress-this-summer-1 With forecasts predicting another long hot summer ahead for southern regions, trace mineral supplementation is one effective solution to help combat heat stress in livestock over the coming months, says animal health company Virbac Australia. “High temperatures can affect everything from conception and fertility rates to immunity, meat quality and milk production, leading to significant economic impacts for producers,” reports Virbac Australia’s Technical Services Veterinarian Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas. “In extreme cases, it can even lead to livestock mortality.” Cattle begin feeling uncomfortable above 25°C – which means that heat stress will be an issue across all Australian livestock regions. For southern regions, cattle are particularly at risk of heat stress coming out of winter, and are more exposed to extreme heat events. What’s often surprising is that it’s not only extremely high daytime temperatures that trigger heat stress. Warmer night times can have more of an impact, says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. “Hot nights can be dangerous for livestock, as it’s harder to thermoregulate, dissipate heat accumulated during the day, and reduce their core temperature. That places them under continuous stress, increasing respiration, heart rate and water intake, and placing a strain on multiple physiological processes. In fact, recent research has revealed air temperatures rising as little as just 1.5°C above average can decrease conception rates by as much as 5%1. Even before birth, calves suffer the negative consequences of heat stress if cows were heat stressed during late pregnancy2.” “Heat stress affects the animal’s oxidative status, it increases the production of free radicals and reduces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to oxidative stress. In both beef cattle and sheep, oxidising agents present in the meat lead to lipid and protein peroxidation affecting muscle fibre structure, resulting in high drip loss, undesirable meat colour and shorter shelf life. In dairy cows, oxidative stress negatively impacts milk production and health. Cows under oxidative stress have increased incidence of mastitis, higher somatic cells count, poor responses to vaccination, decreased fertility, increased embryo mortality, abortion, premature calving, retained foetal membranes, and uterine infections. Furthermore, oxidative stress also affects sperm concentration and viability in males3,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. It’s clear that heat stress has real potential for devastating losses in terms of both performance and production – but the good news is that it can be effectively managed. Virbac Australia advises farmers and producers to act now and will be running free webinars on ways to minimise the impact of heat stress in livestock over summer. A pre-summer review of preparedness for heat stress is a great idea. This should include an examination of the livestock environment, including site characteristics, infrastructure and condition, to provide good shade and water sources, and even fans and sprinklers in intensive production environments. “Adequate water is essential,” Dr Gonzalez-Rivas explains. “It's worth remembering that animals under heat stress lose much more water through respiration and perspiration, often requiring up to five times more water than usual.” Having a good summer nutrition program that includes trace mineral supplementation is also key. Dr Gonzalez-Rivas recommends using a trace-mineral injection like Multimin injection to improve antioxidant activity “Antioxidants are an ideal heat stress abatement strategy, and Multimin adds important trace minerals like manganese, zinc, selenium and copper, to help boost antioxidants, reproductive performance and immune function4, 5. We also recommend increasing energy density to compensate for reduced feed intake,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas – “including slowly fermentable starch to reduce the amount of heat released in the rumen during fermentation6, as well as supplemental fat that bypasses the rumen and minimises the heat released during digestion.” High-quality forage and fibre also help optimise rumen efficiency and function, particularly for animals receiving high starch diets. If supplementary feeding, modify this strategy from once to twice-a-day feeding, and consider feeding less during the hotter hours and more at night, to allow heat dissipation7. It can also be beneficial to balance the mineral and electrolyte content, because excessive sweating or panting results in losses of sodium, potassium and bicarbonate, increasing the risks of acidosis and mineral imbalances. Victorian dairy farmer, Renee Murfett, is a big believer that it pays to be preventive rather than reactive when it comes to heat stress in cattle. “Summer can be harsh on our cows, so we make sure they’ve always got access to shade and water. We have a sprinkler system set up in our yard for hot days which not only cools the cows but also stops their frustration with flies. The first signs of heat stress we notice is heavy breathing and stock not wanting to move away from the shade. In more severe cases, they go down with exhaustion. We can lose anywhere from 500 to 1,000 litres of milk a day during a heat wave so Multimin is definitely something we are open to trialling in our cows during a heat stress event.” As Dr Gonzalez-Rivas concludes, “a proactive approach to the management of heat stress is more effective than a reactive response once it has occurred. Right now, is a great time to begin implementing the best processes to minimise the impact of what’s set to be another blisteringly hot Australian summer and I encourage all farmers and producers to register to our free webinars.” Get your livestock performance ready for summer. Sign up for the heat load index forecast, and heat stress alerts for beef cattle at chlt.com.au and for dairy cattle at dairy.katestone.com.au For more information and to register to the free webinars run by Virbac Australia, visit au.virbac.com/webinars Beef webinar: Thursday 31st October at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Dairy webinar: Thursday 5th December at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Ends MEDIA CONTACT Adam Arndell - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au [1] David Wolfenson, Zvi Roth, Impact of heat stress on cow reproduction and fertility, Animal Frontiers, Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages 32–38. 2 Fabris, T. F., Laporta, J., Skibiel, A. L., Corra, F. N., Senn, B. D., Wohlgemuth, S. E., & Dahl, G. E. (2019). Effect of heat stress during early, late, and entire dry period on dairy cattle. Journal of dairy science, 102(6), 5647-5656. 3 Celi P. (2011) Oxidative Stress in Ruminants. In: Mandelker L., Vajdovich P. (eds) Studies on Veterinary Medicine. Oxidative Stress in Applied Basic Research and Clinical Practice. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ 4 Machado, V. S., Oikonomou, G., Lima, S. F., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kacar, C., Foditsch, C., ... & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). The effect of injectable trace minerals (selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese) on peripheral blood leukocyte activity and serum superoxide dismutase activity of lactating Holstein cows. The Veterinary Journal, 200(2), 299-304. 5 Teixeira, A. G. V., Lima, F. S., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kussler, A., Lima, S. F., Felippe, M. J., & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). Effect of an injectable trace mineral supplement containing selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves. Journal of dairy science, 97(7), 4216-4226. 6 Gonzalez-Rivas, P. A., DiGiacomo, K., Russo, V. M., Leury, B. J., Cottrell, J. J., & Dunshea, F. R. (2016). Feeding slowly fermentable grains has the potential to ameliorate heat stress in grain-fed wethers. Journal of animal science, 94(7), 2981-2991. 7 Mader, T. L., Davis, M. S., & Brown-Brandl, T. (2006). Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle. Journal of Animal Science, 84(3), 712-719. Photo captions: Victorian Dairy Farmer Renee Murfett with Dr Susan Swaney Dairy cattle in Victoria FluroSat appoints Global Director for Business & Product Development 2019-10-17T09:01:59Z flurosat-appoints-global-director-for-business-amp-product-development Sydney, Australia, October 17 2019 — FluroSat is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr Manal Elarab as its Global Director of Business & Product Development, based out of California, U.S.A. This strategic appointment comes as part of FluroSat’s business expansion into the Americas following a range of successful deployments with industry leaders. In her role, Dr. Elarab is responsible for leading FluroSat’s teams across the globe to develop a suite of strategically important products in business partnerships with industry leaders, cementing FluroSat’s position as a market leader in scalable agronomic analytics. As FluroSat’s first senior executive hire outside Australia, Dr Elarab’s appointment will enable FluroSat to scale up its efforts dedicated especially to the agriculture market in the Americas. Her unique expertise comprises years of experience in developing scientific remote sensing solutions for agronomists coupled with a keen eye for commercialisation of novel products powered by customer’s needs. Dr. Elarab’s immediate goals will be to extend and accelerate the innovation delivered by FluroSat’s analytics engine FluroSense to a range of key industry stakeholders. “Dr Elarab’s skills are a unique match to FluroSat’s DNA. She is an agronomist, with a proven track record of commercialisation of analytics products stemming from her engagement with the global community of passionate agronomists,” said Dr Anastasia Volkova, CEO & Founder of FluroSat. “To those who know our business closely, it is evident, that the approach of building tools with and for our community lies at the heart of our business, and deeply resonates with Dr Elarab. We are thrilled to have her join us in bringing to life FluroSat’s vision of precision #ag4.0”. Prior to joining FluroSat, Dr Elarab held an executive position as Director for Enterprise Solutions with MicaSense, a global company that is at the forefront of multispectral sensor development. She was instrumental in leading teams doing scientific and commercial research to rethink how the integration of remote sensing and precision agriculture can deliver innovative products to meet customers’ needs and requirements. Dr Elarab will drive the commercial roadmap at FluroSat, engaging with FluroSat’s customers and partners to deliver the next generation of its science-based analytics engine, FluroSense, to help agronomists and agribusiness monitor crop health and optimise management practices at a large scale. World-class technologies setting the benchmark for irrigation efficiencies in Australia 2019-10-16T07:44:25Z world-class-technologies-setting-the-benchmark-for-irrigation-efficiencies-in-australia World-class technologies setting the benchmark for irrigation efficiencies in Australia   PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 16 October, 2019   (Australia) – October 19 -  Lindsay Corporation, a leading global manufacturer and distributor of irrigation and infrastructure equipment and technology, has announced the launch of two new, customer-driven irrigation solutions designed to help Australian growers improve productivity and conserve resources.   The release of Next Gen Zimmatic® Controllers and a new Pivoting Lateral will give growers greater control over their irrigation, save energy and help increase irrigable land. “We’re excited to be launching these two new products – both of which will provide efficiencies for growers at a time when they need it the most. Australian farmers are looking to maximise yields with fewer inputs and this state-of-the-art technology helps them make the most of their valuable irrigation water, while boosting productivity at the same time,” said Richard Hall, Lindsay Regional Manager SE Asia, Australia/NZ. Next Gen Zimmatic  Controllers are designed to make remote monitoring and control capabilities even more accessible. They’re simple to use and provide quick adjustments to water depth, allowing growers to be responsive to weather conditions.   The full range of Next Gen Zimmatic Controllers includes the 500C, the 700C and the 712C. Features include: Smart barrier automation that provides a simple method for irrigating part circles, enabling the pivot to automatically reverse, return and stop at your original starting point. Simple yet sophisticated Advanced Plan creation – making it easier than ever for growers to create custom, accurate irrigation programs unique to each field. Smart alignment that provides real-time, visual feedback when confirming machine alignment. Over-the-air serviceability making software and firmware updates and addition of future feature enhancements easier than ever. More end gun areas and management capabilities. Additional input and output ports for immense flexibility in adding other accessories and sensors. An easier-than-ever interface based on mobile app design principles provides users with intuitive operation in the field and via the FieldNET™ mobile app. Each controller comes FieldNET-ready, allowing farmers to view and control their irrigation systems from virtually anywhere. FieldNET is the industry’s leading remote irrigation management tool, featuring integrated water, fertiliser, chemigation and scheduling solutions that reduce costs for growers by saving water, energy and time in the field. Zimmatic 9520PL is a new Pivoting Lateral that is a cost-effective, yet technologically advanced solution to irrigate more land with tremendous flexibility. Its exclusive optical barrier offers more programming flexibility than physical barricades, and GPS technology enhances accuracy, saves time and requires less maintenance than furrow-guided machines.   The Zimmatic 9520PL is ideally suited to irrigating high‑value crops especially on large, irregular-shaped fields where multiple traditional centre pivot and lateral-move systems may not be cost‑effective.   “The grower decides how to use this product most effectively and this customised control gives them the ability to irrigate in difficult areas - meaning farmers can meaningfully increase the amount of land they can irrigate which is a huge step forward,” said Mr Hall.   Both the Zimmatic 9520PL and Next Gen Zimmatic Controllers are expected to be available in Australia by the end of the calendar year.   “We are proud that Lindsay continues to lead the way in developing innovative irrigation solutions in response to the changing needs of farmers - particularly during this challenging period when Australian growers are becoming more reliant on equipment that produces on-farm efficiencies,” concluded Mr Hall.   For information about the complete line of Zimmatic and FieldNET products and services, talk to your local Zimmatic dealer, or visit www.ZimmaticANZ.com   For media enquiries, please contact Dee Wilkes-Bowes: dee@saucecommunications.com.au; Mob: 0427 006 404   Please note high resolution images of equipment are available on request. About Lindsay Corporation Lindsay Corporation (NYSE: LNN) is a leading global manufacturer and distributor of irrigation and infrastructure equipment and technology. Established in 1955, the company has been at the forefront of research and development of innovative solutions to meet the food, fuel, fiber and transportation needs of the world's rapidly growing population. The Lindsay family of irrigation brands includes Zimmatic® center pivot and lateral move agricultural irrigation systems and FieldNET® remote irrigation management and scheduling technology, as well as irrigation consulting and design and industrial IoT solutions. Also a global leader in the transportation industry, Lindsay Transportation Solutions manufactures equipment to improve road safety and keep traffic moving on the world's roads, bridges and tunnels, through the Barrier Systems®, Road Zipper® and Snoline™ brands. For more information about Lindsay Corporation, visit www.lindsay.com.   FieldNET, Zimmatic, Barrier Systems and Road Zipper are trademarks or registered trademarks of Lindsay or its subsidiaries.   Scholarship fund receives boost from Farm Institute Award 2019-10-15T09:06:51Z scholarship-fund-receives-boost-from-farm-institute-award The 2019 winner of a prestigious Australian Farm Institute competition has dedicated her award to the memory of a former colleague and donated the prizemoney to a scholarship in her name.   Jessica Ramsden, Corporate and Government Affairs Manager at Elanco Animal Health and PhD student at the Australian National University, was presented with the John Ralph Essay Competition prize at the AFI Roundtable event at the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra on October 15, 2019.   “Kristina was my mentor from the time I arrived at Elanco. She inspired excellence, integrity and purposeful collaborations, and was a thoughtful and generous friend.  She would have been so proud of this achievement.”   In the essay, Jessica explores the future for animal agriculture in Australia and the sector’s challenges including public perceptions about environmental costs, changing animal welfare expectations and the emergence of alternative proteins.    “I was really struck by how old some of these issues are, there is very little that’s new – from alarm about the ecological expense of meat to predictions about the rise of synthetic alternatives. This doesn’t suggest room for complacency, but helps to sharpen our sights on what exactly is different now, to be clear about why animal agriculture is worthy of a significant future, and to help us sort through the complexities of creating futures we can be proud of.”   The Kristina Hacket Memorial Scholarship honours the Clinical Research Manager at Elanco who passed away in November 2017 after a year-long battle with brain cancer. Kristina’s friends, family and colleagues have since raised over three quarters of the $140,000 target which will endow a perpetual scholarship for women leaders in the fields of agriculture, veterinary and animal sciences at The University of Sydney.    While there is gender parity at undergraduate level, only 16% of key management personnel are female and the overall proportion of women employed in agriculture actually declined in 2018, according to WGEA[1] data.   Graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (Animal Husbandry), Kristina was a passionate advocate for careers in animal health, research and agricultural science. Her work was instrumental in bringing to market innovative technologies and products for both livestock and companion animals.   An initiative which assists women who demonstrate collaborative leadership skills to succeed in management roles is an apt memorial for this quiet and purposeful friend, leader and colleague.   This prizemoney and a matched donation from the animal health industry peak body, Animal Medicines Australia, brings the balance required below $30,000.   Executive Director of Animal Medicines Australia Ben Stapley said the industry association was pleased to support the scholarship.   “Kristina’s contribution to the animal agriculture sector continues not only through those who knew and worked with her, but also through this scholarship which will help support leaders in the future.   “I extend my congratulations to Jessica for receiving this prestigious award and for her impressive contribution to our collective understanding of the positive future of animal agriculture.”   To donate to the Kristina Hacket Memorial Scholarship, visit The University of Sydney dedicated page at crowdfunding.sydney.edu.au/project/9117 [1] https://data.wgea.gov.au/industries/282#gender_comp_content Cow butchered alive 2019-10-10T11:46:57Z cow-butchered-alive-1 Dear Editor, People in Darwin and throughout the country are rightly dismayed at the light sentence handed out this week in the case of the man who cut the leg and backstrap (loin) from a living cow. The cow was stunned with the blunt end of an axe, but regained consciousness, in extreme agony. The offender was part of a group who came back later, after the cow had been killed, shouting "we want meat!" The man was given neither a fine nor a conviction, but was sentenced to 150 days community service. Under the N.T. Animal Welfare Act, offences can result in fines of $13,700 but penalties for cases of cruelty to animals are rarely imposed to the full extent of the law. In this case, pastoralists told police they had "never seen an animal in such distress", and had to shoot the cow. Numerous studies show that people who harm other animals often move on to harm their fellow humans. For example, one U.S. study found that animal abusers are five times more likely to commit violent crimes against humans. Another study in Australia revealed that 100 percent of sexual homicide offenders examined had a history of animal cruelty. It’s time that this country started to treat cases of cruelty to animals as the serious crimes that they are, because the whole of society is at risk when we don’t. If you suspect someone of abusing an animal, report it to authorities right away for the safety of animals and humans alike. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Strategist People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Australia) PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002. (08) 8556-5828 Injectable trace minerals: a solution to combat livestock heat stress this summer 2019-10-06T20:30:00Z injectable-trace-minerals-a-solution-to-combat-livestock-heat-stress-this-summer With forecasts predicting another long hot summer ahead for northern regions, trace mineral supplementation is one effective solution to help combat heat stress in livestock over the coming months, says animal health company Virbac Australia. “High temperatures can affect everything from conception and fertility rates to immunity, meat quality and production loss, leading to significant economic impacts for producers,” reports Virbac Australia’s Technical Services Veterinarian Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas. “In extreme cases, it can even lead to livestock mortality.” Cattle begin feeling uncomfortable above 25°C – which means that heat stress will be an issue across all Australian livestock regions. For northern regions, high heat load resulting from more extreme humidity is an even greater problem. What’s often surprising is that it’s not only extremely high daytime temperatures that trigger heat stress. Warmer night times can have more of an impact, says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. “Hot nights can be dangerous for livestock, as it’s harder to thermoregulate, dissipate heat accumulated during the day, and reduce their core temperature. That places them under continuous stress, increasing respiration, heart rate and water intake, and placing a strain on multiple physiological processes. In fact, recent research has revealed air temperatures rising as little as just 1.5°C above average can decrease conception rates by as much as 5%1. Even before birth, calves suffer the negative consequences of heat stress if cows were heat stressed during late pregnancy2.” “Heat stress affects the animal’s oxidative status, it increases the production of free radicals and reduces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to oxidative stress. In both beef cattle and sheep, oxidising agents present in the meat lead to lipid and protein peroxidation affecting muscle fibre structure, resulting in high drip loss, undesirable meat colour and shorter shelf life. For females, heat stress can also lead to much higher rates of embryo mortality, while also affecting sperm concentration and viability in males,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. Livestock Compliance & Project Co-ordinator at Bindaree Beef Group, Corina Muckenschnabl, is a big believer that it pays to be preventive rather than reactive when it comes to heat stress in cattle. “Our pre-summer checklist always includes a review of our heat stress management plan where we conduct a risk assessment based on cattle breed and shade infrastructure at our Myola Feedlot in Northern New South Wales. The Cattle Heat Load Toolbox (CHLT) calculates our heat load index threshold to determine if our stock are at low or high risk for heat stress and allows us to proactively manage the risk of heat stress at our site. Although the CHLT alarms us via a text message when we may need to implement our heat stress management plan, we need to be prepared well before we hit our heat load index threshold.” It’s clear that heat stress has real potential for devastating losses in terms of both performance and production – but the good news is that it can be effectively managed. Virbac Australia advises farmers and producers to act now and will be running free webinars on ways to minimise the impact of heat stress in livestock over summer. A pre-summer review of preparedness for heat stress is a great idea. This should include an examination of the livestock environment, including site characteristics, infrastructure and condition, to provide good shade and water sources, and even fans and sprinklers in intensive production environments. “Adequate water is essential,” Dr Gonzalez-Rivas explains. “It's worth remembering that animals under heat stress lose much more water through respiration and perspiration, often requiring up to five times more water than usual.” Having a good summer nutrition program that includes trace mineral supplementation is also key. Dr Gonzalez-Rivas recommends using a trace-mineral injection like Multimin injection to improve antioxidant activity. Antioxidants are an ideal heat stress abatement strategy, and Multimin adds important trace minerals like manganese, zinc, selenium and copper, to help boost antioxidants, reproductive performance and immune function 3,4. We also recommend increasing energy density to compensate for reduced feed intake,” says Dr Gonzalez Rivas – “including slowly fermentable starch to reduce the amount of heat released in the rumen during fermentation5, as well as supplemental fat that bypasses the rumen and minimises the heat released during digestion.” High-quality forage and fibre also help optimise rumen efficiency and function, particularly for animals receiving high starch diets. If supplementary feeding, modify this strategy from once to twice-a-day feeding, and consider feeding less during the hotter hours and more at night, to allow heat dissipation6. It can also be beneficial to balance the mineral and electrolyte content, because excessive sweating or panting results in losses of sodium, potassium and bicarbonate, increasing the risks of acidosis and mineral imbalances. As Dr Gonzalez-Rivas concludes, “a proactive approach to the management of heat stress is more effective than a reactive response once it has occurred. Right now, is a great time to begin implementing the best processes to minimise the impact of what’s set to be another blisteringly hot Australian summer and I encourage all farmers and producers to register to our free webinars.” Get your livestock performance ready for summer. Sign up for the heat load index forecast, and heat stress alerts for beef cattle at chlt.com.au and for dairy cattle at dairy.katestone.com.au For more information and to register to the free webinars run by Virbac Australia, visit au.virbac.com/webinars Beef webinar: Thursday 31st October at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Dairy webinar: Thursday 5th December at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Ends MEDIA CONTACT Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas during a cattle trial Beef cattle in Northern Australia [1] David Wolfenson, Zvi Roth, Impact of heat stress on cow reproduction and fertility, Animal Frontiers, Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages 32–38, https://doi.org/10.1093/af/vfy027 2 Fabris, T. F., Laporta, J., Skibiel, A. L., Corra, F. N., Senn, B. D., Wohlgemuth, S. E., & Dahl, G. E. (2019). Effect of heat stress during early, late, and entire dry period on dairy cattle. Journal of dairy science, 102(6), 5647-5656. 3 Machado, V. S., Oikonomou, G., Lima, S. F., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kacar, C., Foditsch, C., ... & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). The effect of injectable trace minerals (selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese) on peripheral blood leukocyte activity and serum superoxide dismutase activity of lactating Holstein cows. The Veterinary Journal, 200(2), 299-304. 4 Teixeira, A. G. V., Lima, F. S., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kussler, A., Lima, S. F., Felippe, M. J., & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). Effect of an injectable trace mineral supplement containing selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves. Journal of dairy science, 97(7), 4216-4226. 5 Gonzalez-Rivas, P. A., DiGiacomo, K., Russo, V. M., Leury, B. J., Cottrell, J. J., & Dunshea, F. R. (2016). Feeding slowly fermentable grains has the potential to ameliorate heat stress in grain-fed wethers. Journal of animal science, 94(7), 2981-2991. 6 Mader, T. L., Davis, M. S., & Brown-Brandl, T. (2006). Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle. Journal of Animal Science, 84(3), 712-719. DSM introduces Bovaer®, the feed additive that enables farmers to achieve consistent methane reduction from cows by ~30% 2019-09-30T22:12:20Z dsm-introduces-bovaer-the-feed-additive-that-enables-farmers-to-achieve-consistent-methane-reduction-from-cows-by-30 Royal DSM, a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and sustainable living, today announced during an update webinar that its new feed additive which enables farmers to consistently and conveniently reduce methane emissions from dairy, beef and other ruminant herds, will be named Bovaer®. DSM also shared that it is currently working with authorities, scientific, and private partners from across the value chain and in multiple geographies, on the application of Bovaer® in various farming systems and development of solutions to demonstrate usage and measure the impact of Bovaer®. The latter will ensure the efforts of farmers and dairy companies can be recognized for the positive contribution they make. Bovaer® is a first result of DSM’s Project Clean Cow, a 10-year journey of research and development. It is the most extensively studied and scientifically proven solution to the challenge of burped methane to date. Over the past 10 years, 35 on-farm beef and dairy trials across the globe and in various feeding systems were conducted. They showed that an enteric methane reduction of ~30% can be consistently achieved. Some trials went up as high as 80% reduction. In addition, more than 25 peer-reviewed studies have been published which fully clarify and prove the mode of action. Bovaer® is a firm proof point of DSM’s purpose-led, performance-driven strategy, building on decades of heritage delivering science-based, sustainable and scalable solutions that respond to the challenges our world faces. The solution has recently also been featured by the World Resources Institute as one of the ten global break-through technologies that can help to feed the world sustainably. Across the globe DSM is working with partners from the dairy value chain to prepare for market introduction of Bovaer®. These activities include trials to confirm effectiveness in local farming systems and further build up practical farm experience. In Denmark, Norway, United Kingdom and Ireland trials are planned with local scientific institutes and partners from the dairy chain commencing in 2020. In the Netherlands, DSM in cooperation with a consortium from across the Dutch dairy value chain is taking the next step towards implementation by setting up a trial at the Dairy Campus Leeuwarden that aims to gather all information necessary for accreditation by the Climate Module of the “Kringloopwijzer”. These results will also form the foundation for accreditation systems in other geographies.   Methane is a natural byproduct of digestion in cows and other ruminants, released into the atmosphere through burping. Just a quarter teaspoon of Bovaer® per cow per day suppresses the enzyme that triggers methane production in a cow’s rumen. It takes effect immediately and it’s safely broken down in the cow’s normal digestive system. As soon as the additive is not fed anymore, full methane production resumes and there are no lasting effects in the cow. The feed additive Bovaer® therefore contributes to a significant and immediate reduction of the environmental footprint of meat, milk and dairy products, key sources of high quality and affordable protein around the world. Methane is a greenhouse gas which, like carbon dioxide, contributes to climate change. Methane is a short-lived, but much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2 and ruminants (mainly cows) emit about 20% of all methane gasses globally. Reducing global methane emissions from cows will thus result in immediate impact and therewith help slow the pace of global warming in the next decade already, to facilitate society taking longer-term action on CO2 reduction. Bovaer® could therefore significantly contribute to various UN Sustainable Development Goals, including Climate Action. Bovaer® has recently been filed for registration in Europe where it will be available as soon as market authorization is granted with a launch in the region anticipated in late 2020/early 2021. Registrations of the feed additive in other regions will follow. ### Royal DSM is a global, purpose-led, science-based company active in Nutrition, Health and Sustainable Living. DSM’s purpose is to create brighter lives for all. DSM addresses with its products and solutions some of the world’s biggest challenges while simultaneously creating economic, environmental and societal value for all its stakeholders — customers, employees, shareholders, and society at large. DSM delivers innovative solutions for human nutrition, animal nutrition, personal care and aroma, medical devices, green products and applications, and new mobility and connectivity. DSM and its associated companies deliver annual net sales of about €10 billion with approximately 23,000 employees. The company was founded in 1902 and is listed on Euronext Amsterdam. More information can be found at www.dsm.com. Parasite management roadshow tours Ballarat offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-18T23:18:36Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-ballarat-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Ballarat in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Ballarat event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Jim Gaylard from Trawalla, described his local event as “a good reminder on the advantages of early weaning and the importance of worm control in young stock. It emphasized the importance of maintaining pastures and worm burdens in younger animals. We’ve been using Cydectin Long Acting injection in our sheep for quite some years and we will now use it in our weaning program to keep our cattle worm free for 120 days and our pastures cleaner.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Ballarat on-farm demonstration Ballarat event attendees Precision Agriculture grows its South Australian network with new appointment 2019-09-18T05:45:05Z precision-agriculture-grows-its-south-australian-network-with-new-appointment Leading agriculture technology services provider Precision Agriculture (PA) is pleased to appoint Mark Bastian to the position of Area Manager, Southern Region, marking the start of an exciting growth period in the company’s South Australian operations.   Based in Adelaide, Mark has returned to his South Australian roots after working in farm machinery sales in different parts of Australia over the past 10 years. His most significant role was as National Sales Manager for Techgrow, a company specialising in fertiliser spreaders, and he has also held positions with John Deere and Agrifac.   But it’s his passion for soil science which attracted Mark to this new role, and the chance to be part of a company which is at the forefront of precision agriculture.   “Soil science is something I have a strong interest in, so working for PA is a great fit,” Mark said. “The fact that the company isn’t aligned to a particular brand, but rather is focused on consulting work, is something that I found really appealing.”   After receiving a Rural Business Management Degree at Marcus Oldham College in Geelong, Mark went to work on broadacre cropping properties to see firsthand how farm enterprises are managed. His experience in the following years with Techgrow highlighted the importance of precision agriculture and the benefits it can bring to farmers in southern Australia.   “I’m keen to work with farmers to maximise the potential of their farming enterprises and spread awareness of Precision Agriculture and the services we provide. Our key offering is Gridmap Soil Sampling and it’s important that growers have a thorough understanding of their soils. There’s a lot of emphasis on what goes into a crop above the ground but it all really starts from the ground up, and it’s important to know what’s going on below the surface.”   Mark will join the PA team at the Yorke Peninsula Field Days held in Paskeville from September 24 – 26. The display will focus on the company’s extensive range of services, including yield mapping, GPS guidance management, crop surveillance, digital farm mapping, farm productivity assessments, variable rate applications, surface water management, soil management plans and on-farm trials.   “It’s a great networking opportunity for us and we’re looking forward to introducing Precision Agriculture and its suite of services to the wider South Australian farming community” Mark said.     Precision Agriculture will be located at site number 4, in ‘The Shed’ at Yorke Peninsula Field Days. To contact Mark Bastian please call 0417815303 or email mark.bastian@precisionagriculture.com.au   Parasite management roadshow tours Mortlake offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T21:43:04Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-mortlake-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Mortlake in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Mortlake event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Mick Fitzgibbon from “Clogheen” described his local event as “a great opportunity for young and old to learn about best practice weaner management and animal health. As an older person in the industry, it’s always good to see these types of events so that the next generation of cattle producers can get an idea on best practice today. We’ve used Cydectin Long Acting injection for over 3 years to reduce our worm burden in our weaned calves and heifers that have just calved and we are very happy with the results we’re seeing.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Mortlake on-farm demonstration