The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2021-03-26T01:19:43Z Mouse Plague: How Rural Residents Are Using Data to Outsmart Swarms of Rodents 2021-03-26T01:19:43Z mouse-plague-how-rural-residents-are-using-data-to-outsmart-swarms-of-rodents Rural areas on the East Coast of Australia are being ravaged by a mouse plague, the scale of which feels almost biblical. “They’re everywhere,” says Jackie Coe from Dunedoo in the beautiful Warrumbungle shire of NSW. “We’ve never seen anything like this.” With mice invading properties in epic numbers, some residents are forsaking traditional methods like poisonous baits and steel traps for SMART Digital Pest Control - an intelligent system which uses data and non-toxic methods to trap rodents. Monitoring the premises 24/7, it’s catching mice in huge numbers. Mice Cause Havoc for Grocers, Residents and Farmers   Jackie runs a coffee shop out of the converted dining room of the picturesque heritage pub in Dunedoo, as well as a B & B cottage. “My biggest frustration is losing stock. The other day they got into our vege garden and ruined all the corn. I can only imagine what the big supermarkets and farmers are experiencing.” The mice have been swarming for the past couple of months, triggered by a confluence of unique conditions. The switch from last year’s drought to a season of regular rain - plus an unusually large grain harvest - has provided rodents with ideal breeding grounds. They mice are causing havoc for grocers and residents, plus farmers who are losing hundreds of thousands dollars’ worth of harvest. Alan Brown, a farmer in Wagga Wagga told The Guardian that “rats are at a nuisance level, but the mice are in plague proportions, particularly in the north and west and south-west of the state. They are causing serious problems now with people getting bitten.” Jackie says she’s heard similar stories; particularly of one woman with a disability in Dunedoo suffering distress as mice have bitten her feet. They’re being found floating en masse in swimming pools or in skimmer boxes. SMART Solutions Remove the Risk of Secondary Poisoning People have been using traditional methods to try and catch the mice, such as steel traps and poisonous baits. Unfortunately, both methods can be problematic thanks to the secondary risks they pose to children and pets. “We once had a cocker spaniel that died after eating several dead mice that had been poisoned by rodent baits,” says Jackie. “We’ve got lots of pets, including chickens, so we don’t want to take risks. I also saw someone had put down sachets of Ratsak in the park, which is dangerous.” The risk of secondary poisoning is particularly acute for farms and food businesses. Jackie has taken another method, installing Flick Pest Control’s SMART boxes in her home, B & B cottage and the coffee shop.   SMART is an intelligent system which uses data instead of poison to monitor for rodents, before trapping them with a non-toxic attractant. Flick monitors the system remotely, providing reports and adjusting the solution accordingly. It’s a method that’s particularly effective for large-scale areas or commercial warehouses and farms. “It’s very effective, fantastic really,” says Jackie. “The boxes are easy to relocate and empty - although that’s not pleasant! We’ve caught 250 in the last month.” As Australia’s leading pest control business, Flick has a nationwide presence. For more information on SMART and how we’re helping to fight the mouse plague, visit the website or contact:   Kevin Saul Branch Manager, Flick Dubbo kevin.saul@flick.com.au 0417 231 067   Winners of Queensland Shows Awards announced 2021-03-20T12:12:40Z winners-of-queensland-shows-awards-announced The annual Queensland Shows Awards were announced tonight in Roma. The awards, in their sixth year, are run by the Next Generation committee of Queensland Ag Shows and recognise excellence in the agricultural show movement.“Agricultural shows have played a leading role in the development of agriculture and communities since the first show was conducted in 1822 in Hobart. They are one of the oldest continuous events in post-colonial Australian society and are still popular in every state and territory with around 587 shows run annually in Australia,” Next Generation president Kait Shultz, from Pittsworth, said. “In Queensland there are 127 Agricultural Show Societies run by more than 13,500 volunteers attracting more than 1.3 million visitors every year.”“Tonight’s winners are the epitome of what makes the show movement enduringly successful. They are tireless volunteers, determined and dedicated community members whose skills ensure their local show grows and thrives.”OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTIONTaroom Show’s Eric Green, better known as ‘Snow', won the Outstanding Contribution category for 52 years of committee contribution including performing the role of President three separate times over three different decades; in 1984, 1992-93 and in 2013. “Snow’s latest project has been assisting with the development of new prime cattle yards. He was there to supervise everyday and relished the task of being involved in the largest infrastructure program Taroom Show has undertaken in the last 30 years. It should be noted that he also helped to build the existing set of yards that have just been demolished,” Ms Shultz said. Runner up was Dayboro Show’s Alison Taylor who first became secretary in 1988 and is still responsible for mentoring new members and volunteers, bringing new ideas and innovations to life, and most recently implementing an online show nominations program. “Although 2020 presented many unique and new challenges, Alison’s commitment was unwavering throughout, ensuring the showgrounds were adequately prepared for the restrictions imposed due to covid, and helping to guide both the show society and sub-chamber through uncertain times,” Ms Shultz said.EMERGING LEADERThe judges announced a tie for the Emerging Leader of the year.One winner was Bec Skene, Pittsworth Show Society’s chief cattle steward. In the middle of a devastating period of drought in 2020 which saw other shows cancel their cattle sections, Bec was able to attract entries for just over 160 head of cattle in classes from stud cattle to led steers. She nearly doubled that in 2021. Bec tied with Fraser Coast Show’s Melinda Wright, president of a show that attracts 20,000 through the gates on show day. Positive new initiatives include a discount book supporting local businesses for show members, a schools outreach program to bolster next generation entries in agricultural competition, the First Little Farmers Club for children and a ten year strategic plan for the showgrounds.Runner up was Dale McVicar, nominated by the Goondiwindi Show Society. Despite living in Gympie, 460km away, Dale is a dedicated poultry steward in Goondiwindi and is also chief steward of the Gympie Poultry Club. During his tenure, Gympie's numbers have increased to 650 birds per show. At both shows, Dale has championed the replacement of the traditional ‘pen and paper’ system with an electronic entry and scheduling processes.INNOVATION OF THE YEARPittsworth Show Society’s Cook the Crop won best show innovation. When devastating drought necessitated the cancelling of the popular annual crop competition, the concept of the Cook the Crop Competition was borne. The paddock-to-plate 50-minute cooking event pitted six well-known farmers against each other on a stage, cooking a meal from the locally sourced ingredients and crops. Meals included deep fried chickpeas with a sorghum beer, through to meatballs washed down with a wheat beer. It drew a huge crowd, lucrative sponsorship. Runner up was Atherton Show Society’s Mini POP UP Show. In the face of show cancellations thanks to covid, the 117-year old Atherton Show Society hosted the first Mini POP UP Show for the region which brought dodgem cars, jumping castles, a merry-go-round, showbags and show food to the Atherton Showgrounds. People from far and wide within the region came to soak up the show atmosphere. The success of that donation-entry event inspired Cairns Show to host the next Mini POP UP Show and another show society followed. The 2021 judges were Agricultural Shows of Australia chairman Dr. Rob Wilson, immediate past president of the Royal Agricultural Society of New Zealand Geoff Smith, and show ring announcer Lyndsey Douglas.END Queensland Ag Shows identifies six emerging leaders 2021-03-14T08:13:39Z queensland-ag-shows-identifies-six-emerging-leaders Queensland Ag Shows today announced the six finalists of the 2021 Emerging Leader in the Queensland Shows Awards.The awards, in their sixth year this year, are run by the Next Generation committee of Queensland Ag Shows and recognise excellence in the agricultural show movement.“These awards are about recognising the next generation of leaders in the agricultural show movement,” Next Generation president Kait Shultz said. The six finalists in the emerging leaders category are from Goondiwindi, Oakey, Malanda, Pittsworth, Blackbutt and Fraser Coast and were nominated by their show society for their demonstrated leadership in the local show community.Bec Skene (29) was nominated by Pittsworth Show Society for her successes as a chief cattle steward. In the middle of a devastating period of drought in 2020 which saw other shows cancel their cattle sections, Bec was able to attract entries for just over 160 head of cattle in classes from stud cattle to led steers. She nearly doubled that in 2021. Dale McVicar was nominated by the Goondiwindi Show Society. Despite living in Gympie, 460km away, Dale is a dedicated poultry steward in Goondiwindi and is also chief steward of the Gympie Poultry Club. During his tenure, Gympie's numbers have increased to 650 birds per show. At both shows, Dale has championed the replacement of the traditional ‘pen and paper’ system with an electronic entry and scheduling processes.Fraser Coast Show’s nominee is Melinda Wright, president of a show that attracts 20,000 through the gates on show day. Positive new initiatives include a discount book supporting local businesses for show members, a schools outreach program to bolster next generation entries in agricultural competition, the First Little Farmers Club for children and a ten year strategic plan for the showgrounds.Daniel Meacham (31) is the junior vice president of Oakey Show Society. The livestock buyer leveraged his network to successfully reintroduce a prime cattle show and sale, after a 25 year hiatus, as well as young judges competition. A total of 76 head of cattle were entered into the show that first year with 75 per cent of the cattle selling the following day averaging above market prices at auction. The young judges competition attracted 28 students from four local high schools in its first year, and both competitions have strengthened since that first year, despite the impact of drought and covid.Leonie Nichols was nominated by Blackbutt Show Society for her work in stud beef sections of both Nanango and Blackbutt Shows. Leonie is the chief steward of the beef section at Blackbutt taking over from her long time mentor. By all reports, Leonie has run an outstanding stud beef section and sub-chamber young judges and paraders final since she stepped into the role. She was also the first ever Blackbutt Rural Ambassador to reach a state final, and has judged cattle at the Pittsworth show and Redcliffe Show. Kate Stokes was nominated by Malanda Show. Her involvement began as a child with her family being regular exhibitors in both the cattle and a variety of hall exhibits. She took on a leadership role in 2016 in which year she began organising the Malanda Show Dairy Queen quest and the show ball. Today, Kate is the manager of the show and has been successful in securing grants for the show society."These young leaders as worthy of this recognition and are the leaders of the future in their communities and beyond," Kait Shultz said.The 2021 judges were Agricultural Shows of Australia chairman Dr. Rob Wilson, immediate past president of the Royal Agricultural Society of New Zealand Geoff Smith, and show ring announcer Lyndsey Douglas.The Awards will be announced during the Queensland Ag Shows Gala Dinner on Saturday 20th March 2021 at the Roma Explorers Inn to be held in conjunction with the 2021 Queensland Ag Shows Annual General Meeting at Roma Showgrounds.END Queensland's six significant show contributors announced 2021-03-10T00:42:07Z queensland-039-s-six-significant-show-contributors-announced Queensland Ag Shows has today announced the six finalists for Outstanding Individual Contribution in the 2021 Queensland Shows Awards. The awards have been held since 2016 by the Next Generation committee of Queensland Ag Shows and recognise excellence in the agricultural show movement. “They’re about acknowledging the contributions of not just the show societies, but the individuals whose tireless efforts embody what the agricultural show movement is all about,” Next Generation president Kait Shultz, from Pittsworth, said. Representing shows from Taroom to Nanango, Pittsworth, Dayboro, Lowood and Esk, the finalists in the Outstanding Individual Contribution category were nominated by their show societies for dedication, innovation and leadership in their community. Dayboro Show nominated Alison Taylors who first became secretary in 1988 and is still responsible for mentoring new members and volunteers, bringing new ideas and innovations to life, and most recently implementing an online show nominations program. “Although 2020 presented many unique and new challenges, Alison’s commitment was unwavering throughout, ensuring the showgrounds were adequately prepared for the restrictions imposed due to COVID-19, and helping to guide both the show society and sub-chamber through uncertain times,” Ms Shultz said. Taroom Show nominated Eric Green, better known as ‘Snow', for 52 years of committee contribution including performing the role of President three separate times over three different decades; in 1984, 1992-93 and in 2013. “Snow’s latest project has been assisting with the development of new prime cattle yards. He was there to supervise everyday and relished the task of being involved in the largest infrastructure program Taroom Show has undertaken in the last 30 years. It should be noted that he also helped to build the existing set of yards that have just been demolished,” Ms Shultz said. Nanango Show nominated Greg Hunter who has been involved in the Nanango Show Society since the early 1980s as a member and volunteer. Greg was chief steward of the pavilion in 1994 and continued to fulfil this position until 2020, when he retired at the age of 90. “Nanango say that the extent of Greg's contribution knows no bounds. He can be found volunteering in the pavilion, or in the canteen, doing maintenance in the grounds or organising car parking. And when the show isn’t on, he’s likely to be carrying out all the pavilion maintenance: painting, cleaning, construction and setting up as well as the cleaning up after the show. His knowledge and experience is invaluable for newer stewards; he makes their job much easier through his willingness to help out,” Ms Shultz said. Lowood Show Society nominated Janeen Schulz who has been a member since 1978. In 2000, she became the show treasurer and held that position for nine years in which time she became proficient at securing grants that have greatly improved the buildings and grounds. “In 2009 her time as treasurer came to an end, so she decided to help the secretary more with her role. Sadly, the Secretary died so Janeen has taken on that role also,” Ms Shultz said. Janeen is today both secretary and treasurer (again) during a period of important upgrades to the accounting system. “Janeen has worked tirelessly for the Lowood Show Society whether it be doing the minutes, volunteering for catering, mowing, balance sheets, or working bees. She has been provided with challenges and has offered positive outcomes.” Esk Show Society has nominated Jocelyn Frost who has injected an enormous amount to a show society having only moved to the district from an urban environment five years ago. “She immediately took on the honorary treasurer position and held that position for three years… she came forward with many innovative ideas, which has proved successful financially.” Her idea for the Esk Show Society to host a 'Camp and Jam' weekend is one example of such innovation. Pittsworth Show Society held their annual show on the weekend and have nominated Marilyn White whose family have been heavily involved with the show since 1929, inspiring 70 years of Marilyn's own involvement.“For most of her 70 years Marilyn has been an exhibitor in the pavilion classes be it in photography, cooking, needlework or horticulture. Following in her grandfather’s footsteps, Marilyn took on the position of Show secretary in 2016, a position which she still holds. For many years prior to taking on the role as secretary, Marilyn had been a steward in the pavilion,” Ms Shultz said. The Awards will be announced during the Queensland Ag Shows Gala Dinner on Saturday 20th March 2021 at the Roma Explorers Inn to be held in conjunction with the 2021 Queensland Ag Shows Annual General Meeting at Roma Showgrounds.The 2021 judges were Agricultural Shows of Australia chairman Dr. Rob Wilson, immediate past president of the Royal Agricultural Society of New Zealand Geoff Smith, and show ring announcer Lyndsey Douglas.ENDMedia enquiries to Lyndsey Douglas 0424203935 on behalf of Queensland Ag Shows Next Generation. Historic country manor for sale 2021-03-09T00:41:56Z historic-country-manor-for-sale With historical dramas like Downton Abbey and Bridgerton making for some of the hottest television viewing in Australia, it’s no wonder the Historic Royal Breadalbane’s entry onto the property market is capturing the hearts and imaginations of Australians – especially as it’s selling for less than the price of a tiny two bedroom apartment in Sydney.The circa-1878 Southern Tablelands country manor, located just two hours from Sydney CBD and 12 minutes from Goulburn, is being sold by its custodians Rob Chard and Kevin Armstrong who are returning to Perth.Having owned it for 17 years, Rob reflects on the journey to return the historic property to its former glory, when it serviced landed gentry and bushrangers including infamous local identity Ben Hall.“We were in Sydney when we bought it. I had always wanted a beautiful old, historic place as I love old architecture,” Mr Chard said. “I drew a 2-hour circumference around Sydney in my 5-year search but it was impossible to find something that wasn’t miles out or had 1000 acres attached to it for $5 or $10 million.”“When I found this one it was completely derelict with possums and swallows living in it and you’d fall through the floor.”However, Rob and Kevin threw themselves into carefully renovating the former pub, staying true to its architecture and building style.“It deserved original hard plaster render – no Gyprock – and it’s been restumped, reroofed, new wiring and plumbing, free floating solid brush box floors, polished and ready for the next 140 years.”Rob is proud to say the entire eastern wing of the home has been completely renovated, featuring four bedrooms and two bathrooms, a 42m2 kitchen with commercial oven, gas cooktop and marble benchtops, along with expansive living and dining areas.The new owners will appreciate the renovations including a 2,000+-capacity wine cellar and a full-size library with an open fireplace, allowing the modern home office to meld into the historic one.The unrestored 100m2 master wing includes a master bedroom of grand proportions with an open fireplace, walk-in robe with dressing room, ensuite, informal lounge and an office.“If I could I would undo it, brick-by-brick and bring it back to Western Australia, because it’s so special,” Rob said.Such a notable property has attracted many visitors over the years, with Rob and Kevin welcoming them into the home to hear their memories and see the work they’ve done.“Fifteen years before we bought it, it was still a working pub and everyone who drops by has a story,” Mr Chard said, describing how when the “no drinking on Sunday rule” existed, travellers more than 20km from their home were exempt. Given Breadalbane was 25km from Goulburn, people could get on a train, come to the pub and head home again.It’s still this convenient location, just two minutes from the Hume Highway and centrally situated 2 hours from Sydney CBD and 45 minutes from Canberra, that means there are endless opportunities for easy rural living or business ventures at the property, according to agent George Southwell.“There is potential for it to be transformed into luxury BnB style accommodation, a restaurant or its sprawling grounds with established lawns and gardens would make a stunning wedding venue catering for the entire event from the ceremony through to the reception.“While price guides for city real estate are being set much lower than the expected sale price, the $1,060,000 set for Historic Royal Breadalbane is a true guide representing exceptional value for money, but also Rob and Kevin’s genuine desire to make the sale process as transparent as possible for the next custodians who take on this treasured property.”“Furthermore, being on a generous 4,793m2 block, the property comprises two titles, providing subdivision potential,” the agent explained.Breadalbane is ready for its legacy to continue on.ENDAgent: George Southwell +61 429 838 345 george.southwell@raywhite.com Rural agent says it pays to escape the city 2021-03-03T19:55:00Z rural-agent-says-it-pays-to-escape-the-city The popularity of cash flow positive hobby farms is being driven by a Covid-influenced migration of urban professionals to regional Australia, a rural agent confirms. Rural and farmland sales agent George Southwell, 25, says buyers are attracted to the income generating opportunities small hectares bring. “We’re seeing an influx of decisive relocators from Canberra and Sydney, and lately they’re looking beyond the big homes on broad blocks at small farms with income potential,” he said. George Southwell stated that the move is enticing both due to the lifestyle on offer and now a broader awareness of the financial benefits. “With international borders closed and a newfound ability to do the job outside the office, weekend escapes to the country, bush retreats, lifestyle properties and increasingly hobby farms, have gone from being retirement pipedreams to right-now realities.”Hobby farms in the Canberra Region, South Coast, North Coast, and around regional centres like Orange and Bathurst, have had an influx of interest in recent months. The Regional Australia Institute (RAI) recently published research showing that since Covid struck one in five city residents are looking to move to the regions, with more than half wanting to make the jump within the next 12 months.“The Capital Region and southern tablelands rural towns are no longer a hidden secret." Mr Southwell says relocators are showing plenty of interest in two of his current hobby farms for sale. "Martin’s Ridge is on 225ac* (90.67 ha*), or 910,543sqm in city terms, and sits nine minutes outside the little southern tablelands town of Yass, which is just over an hour to Canberra,” Mr Southwell said.“Cattle have successfully been run on Martin's Ridge, and you could easily run 500 head of sheep here thanks to the five paddocks, five dams and improved pastures. On today’s commodity prices, between the wool and meat income, you’re looking at generating over $120,000 per year if you did that...”He says hobby farms that make money are scarce in Australia.Nearby, another property on the market after 49 years with current owners Clive and Rosie Phillips is “Springbourne”. It has held sheep, cattle, ponies and horses over the years.“Cattle have always been our income stream running 30 cows calving every year. We now run steers, the mixture of sown and natural grasses means we can run around 40 steers, luckily we have never run out of water with four dams on the place all having excellent catchment,” Mrs Phillips said."It is now time to move on and allow another family to enjoy the peace and enrichment of living in this beautiful place," she said.The couple built a home on the land 38 years ago, and a tennis court thereafter. "A special track was mown to the top of our hill, we call it the Magic Path, which is brilliant for walking, seeing many of our native animals and birds especially the echidnas. The riding is so easy here, peaceful with stunning views of the mountains." ENDPlease click here for the images for "Martin's Ridge"Please click here for the images for "Springbourne" Unwined in the vines: double the opportunity for Covid tree-changers 2021-03-02T03:28:09Z unwined-in-the-vines-double-the-opportunity-for-covid-tree-changers Edendale & Gaderia offer an idyllic rural lifestyle in a southern tablelands country town. The time has come for the current owners to hand the reins of these stunning properties over to the next generation as they downsize to Canberra, located less than 60 kilometres away.“They owners have opened the door to a rare opportunity for the eventual purchasers to secure a 2.6 acre block with a grand entertainer home, expansive gardens and room to move, while also on offer is a 2.4 acre vacant block with an established vineyard, orchard, boundary trees and superb building sites” the agent, George Southwell, said. “Your very own Sangiovese, Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon await, with 1000 vines in total.”The two properties will be sold separately at auction, unless sold prior as a whole, offering buyers an opportunity to be self-sufficient and reap the benefits of rural living in the Yass Valley.Extensive fruit trees, raised vegetable gardens and berries, shedding - including a machinery shed with insulated cool room and equipment shed - and chook yards have been purposefully planned around the property.Ray White Rural Canberra/Yass agent George Southwell is under no illusion how special these two properties are and expects strong buyer interest on the back of covid-induced rural property interest.“Covid has caused city people to reassess the size of their mortgage, home and their quality of life. The Yass Valley has been a major beneficiary of this.”Lawned areas shaded by established trees create idyllic green spaces for the family to enjoy, while a large deck off the home, ideal for entertaining or simply enjoying a quiet moment, is surrounded by large trees creating a sanctuary.Inside this quality built home natural light flows from every angle thanks to careful planning. Vaulted ceilings emphasise the spacious open plan living that connects to the deck and offers views of the gardens.“No doubt sinking into a chair at the open fireplace will be favoured by the new owners, but the option of gas ducted heating will provide convenience while evaporative cooling provide comfort all year round,” the agent, George Southwell of Ray White Rural Canberra and Yass, said. The modern kitchen features quality benchtops, ample drawer storage and is perfectly situated to enjoy views outside as well as overlooking the open plan living.Four bedrooms, two slate tiled bathrooms and a large laundry with generous storage really show this house has been designed for family life, while a dedicated office means working from home has never been made easier.If that isn’t enough space, the large brick garage has a rumpus room installed to the rear.“These properties represent the best of what is available in the Yass Valley,” he said.“If you did the numbers on the established features it would frighten you, hence why these properties represent value for money,” Mr Southwell finished.ENDPlease click here to view the images for 'Edendale'. Please click here to view the images for 'Gaderian'. Ag Scientists support halving of emissions by 2050 2021-02-21T20:52:38Z ag-scientists-support-halving-of-emissions-by-2050 All major political parties in Australia have wrestled with this issue but debate recently hotted up when the Prime Minister posed an in-principle move toward the 50% by 2050 target. Institute Chair, Dr Turlough Guerin, warned that “agricultural exporters from Australia could be penalised through increased trade restrictions imposed by other countries if they saw our efforts to reduce emissions as inadequate”. The arguments made by the Institute were similar to those recently promoted by the National Farmers Federation. “We simply can’t afford not to do our bit to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases as they cause decline in rainfall in the world’s major food bowls, including Australia’s”, Dr Guerin said. Dr Guerin added that the recent suggestion that agriculture be exempted from efforts to reduce emissions was hard to justify. “As soon as one group is given an exemption, other stakeholders want one too”, he said, “leading to little action by any one”. “The best way to encourage action is to set a good example oneself”, the AIA Chair said. Australian agricultural scientists have recently developed a cheap, effective feed additive for reducing emissions of methane from cattle and sheep. “All we have to do now is work out how to get a feed additive into animals that graze extensively on large areas”, Dr Guerin concluded.   Ag Institute Australia is the peak industry body for agricultural and natural resource management professionals. Ag Institute Australia is committed to advancing the profession, and the application of science and technology, for the sustainable development of agriculture and natural resource management in Australia. Ag Institute Australia members are engaged in a wide range of activities including research, education, government, agribusiness and private consulting. UPDATE: Peter Najarian Appointed to NaturalShrimp, Inc.'s Advisory Board 2021-02-18T04:34:11Z update-peter-najarian-appointed-to-naturalshrimp-inc-s-advisory-board      - Co-founder of Market Rebellion - Pete is a contributor to both CNBC's "Halftime Report" https://www.cnbc.com/halftime/ and "Fast Money" https://www.cnbc.com/fast-money/ Dallas, TX, Feb 18, 2021 - (ACN Newswire) - via NewMediaWire -- NaturalShrimp, Inc., (OTCQB:SHMP), an aquaculture Company which has developed and patented the first commercially operational Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS) for shrimp, announced today that it has appointed Peter Najarian to its advisory board."We could not be more pleased to have Pete join our advisory board at such a pivotal time in the company's history," said Gerald Easterling, CEO of NaturalShrimp. "Pete is arguably one of the most seasoned capital market and entrepreneurial thought leaders in the country. As we continue preparing to launch both our La Coste and NaturalShrimp Iowa locations, we look forward to having access to Pete's input on strategy. Furthermore, we are in the process of appointing additional industry leaders to our advisory board who will provide further valuable insights as we exponentially grow our business," added Easterling."Having Pete join our advisory board allows NaturalShrimp the opportunity to utilize one of the most well-known and respected business figures in finance," said William Delgado, CFO of NaturalShrimp. "We will look for Pete's insights to future macro-economic trends that may impact our business as we begin our expansion in 2021. The company also looks forward to the guidance Pete will provide as we aspire to become an important fixture within the consumer staples segment of the market," added Delgado."I am excited to join NaturalShrimp as they continue to successfully expand their presence within the seafood industry," said Pete Najarian. "I am confident that I can provide NaturalShrimp with guidance that will further the company's objective to operate ecologically controlled, fully contained independent production facilities for the purpose of raising Pacific white shrimp," added Najarian.Pete Najarian, the "Pit Boss," was ranked one of the top 100 traders by Trader Monthly magazine and in 2005 co-founded, together with his brother Jon "DRJ" Najarian, the options news and education firm optionMONSTER, and leading online brokerage firm tradeMONSTER. Both were acquired in 2014 by private equity firm General Atlantic Partners and they sold the firm to E*Trade for $750 million in September of 2016. Following a football career that included several seasons with the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Minnesota Vikings, Pete took up options trading in 1992 joining his brother Jon at Mercury Trading, a market-making firm at the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE). Two years later, he assumed responsibility for Mercury's risk and arbitrage and later led its entry onto the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). He also led Mercury's joint venture with M.J. Meehan, the third-largest specialist firm on the NYSE. From 2000 to 2004, Najarian served as president of Mercury, and helped execute its sale to Citadel, one of the world's largest hedge funds. Before starting optionMONSTER, he has been a founding member of One Chicago, an electronic exchange committed to becoming the global leader in futures on individual stocks, narrow-based indexes, and ETFs. He is also the Co-Founder of Hedgehog stock, options, and futures trading platform and together with brother Jon, co-developed the Heat Seeker(TM) and complementary programs identifying unusual buying activity in stocks, options, and futures. The brothers also invest in and work with start-ups via Rebellion Partners, a venture consulting firm they launched in 2015. Pete is one of the "Fast Money Five" on CNBC's "Fast Money" as well as a cast member of CNBC's "Halftime Report." He also contributes to CBOE-TV, the exchange's popular webcast. Pete graduated from the University of Minnesota with a degree in physiology.ABOUT NATURALSHRIMPNaturalShrimp, Inc. is a publicly traded aquaculture Company, headquartered in Dallas, with production facilities located near San Antonio, Texas. The Company has developed the first commercially viable system for growing shrimp in enclosed, salt-water systems, using patented technology to produce fresh, never frozen, naturally grown shrimp, without the use of antibiotics or toxic chemicals. NaturalShrimp systems can be located anywhere in the world to produce gourmet-grade Pacific white shrimp.Forward Looking StatementsThis press release contains "forward-looking statements." The statements contained in this press release that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements give the Company's current expectations or forecasts of future events. Such statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that are often difficult to predict and beyond the Company's control, and could cause the Company's results to differ materially from those described. In some cases forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as "may," "should," "potential," "continue," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "estimates," and similar expressions. These statements include statements regarding moving forward with executing the Company's global growth strategy. The statements are based upon current beliefs, expectations and assumptions and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict. The Company is providing this information as of the date of this press release and does not undertake any obligation to update any forward looking statements contained in this press release as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and financial trends affecting the financial condition of our business. Forward-looking statements should not be read as a guarantee of future performance or results, and will not necessarily be accurate indications of the times at, or by, which such performance or results will be achieved. Important factors that could cause such differences include, but are not limited to the Risk Factors and other information set forth in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-Q filed on February 16, 2021, and in our other filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.Contact:Richard Brown508-462-9638nesscapconsult@gmail.comSOURCE: Natural Shrimp Lucky Tridectin® user powers up sheep operation and wins over $31,000 in prizes 2021-02-10T06:24:07Z lucky-tridectin-r-user-powers-up-sheep-operation-and-wins-over-31-000-in-prizes Sheep producers nationwide have shared their stories for a chance to share in over $68,000 in prizes. Virbac Australia’s Tridectin Power Up Race promotion partnered with livestock handling specialist Te Pari to create opportunities for sheep producers to win big in 2021. “…The campaign successfully engaged and included the whole community, understanding and helping farmers to optimise their drench and overall animal health programs, and of course we had some really exciting prizes that will prove to be game changers for the lucky winning farmers…” said Alex Roberts, Sheep Product Manager, Virbac Australia. By sharing their stories on how Tridectin has been used on their property, entrants went in the running to win the major prize which included the Te Pari Racewell HD4 Sheep Handler, a $500 charitable donation of the winner’s choice, plus a Te Pari dosing gun, and a Tridectin 10 L pack valued at $31,000.00. The lucky Major Prize Winner was Brad Croker from Stonequarry in NSW. Brad’s testimonial submission explained “…I was looking for a high potency pre-lamb drench with a residual effect, particularly against Barbers Pole worm. The on-farm advice from the team at Elders Goulburn alongside our local Virbac rep Stacey Goldring was key to adding Tridectin to our drench rotation. The short 17-day withholding periods were also vitally important, 12 days post drenching we had a 100% kill rate and our faecal egg count went from 600 to 0…” Brad’s chosen charity to receive a $500 donation as part of the major prize win is the Black Dog Institute. “…I believe men's health is such a big issue and so closely related to so many in our rural community.” In additional, both Brad and his local Elders (Goulburn) store have both chosen to personally match the $500 donation to the charity. He went on to say “…If this helps bring a little more awareness to the Black Dog Institute then I think it’s worth it…”. 10 Runner Up Winners received a 1 L Tridectin and a Te Pari Dosing Gun and included Kiah Sutherland, Appin Sth VIC, Damien Earl, Glencoe SA, Tanya McKenzie, Timboon VIC, Lauchlan Corrigan, Bowna NSW, Corey Taylor, Wannamal WA, Peter Wood, Marong VIC, Tom Spielvogel, Morrisons VIC, Dom Parkman, Young NSW, Jim Lenehan, Guyra NSW and Tom Webb, Lake Hume Village NSW. A total of 10 entrants were also chosen, based on their judged testimonial, to win a 10 L Tridectin pack and an on farm drench assessment (WECRT). These winners were Brad Croker, Stonequarry NSW, Ben Weir, Dunluce VIC, George Nichols, Richmond TAS, James Skeer, Penola SA, Toby Lavender, Williams WA, Charlie Hufton, Gundagai NSW, Matthew Bourchier, Chatsworth VIC, Sophie Nichols, Richmond TAS, Michael Buhlmann, Millicent SA and Kathy Lubcke, Manypeaks WA. Since its launch, Tridectin has positioned itself as the world’s only broad-spectrum combination drench containing moxidectin with a registered claim to kill triple-resistant and monepantel-resistant worms. As a result, it provides a reliable, safe and effective treatment against all the major worm species especially barber’s pole worm, small brown stomach worm, and black scour worm with a very short 17-day Export Slaughter Interval. To read about Tridectin and discover how Tridectin has powered up sheep operations across the county visit www.tridectin.com.au IMAGE CAPTION: Brad Croker from Stonequarry NSW was drawn as the lucky winner of the Tridectin campaign Major Prize Draw valued at $31,000. Ends For more information contact: Kyleen Partridge - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS 0467 612 224 Kyleen.partridge@c7even.com.au Don't worry, be greedy 2021-02-09T00:07:12Z dont-worry-be-greedy Dear Editor, The Deputy Prime Minister has said that the government will consider excluding agriculture from future long-term climate change targets. That makes about as much sense as smoking during cancer treatment. As the government struggles to reach our modest Paris target of 26-28 percent below 2005 emissions by 2030, it’s clear that animal agriculture is a huge part of the problem. According to the International Journal of Climate Change, animal agriculture is the largest contributor to greenhouse gases in Australia – 50 percent of emissions come from the livestock sector. Globally, emissions from agriculture alone would be enough to put the Paris goals out of reach, even if all the other major sources of emissions were closed down. Stopping the breeding, feeding and killing of animals is the quickest and easiest way to reduce greenhouse emissions. To exclude one of the worst climate offenders, one that causes horrendous suffering to its victims, is grossly negligent politics. Mr McCormack says he is "certainly not worried about what might happen in 30 years' time." How nice for him; our kids and grandkids certainly are. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au AUSTRALIA’S SUPPLY CHAIN IN CRITICAL CONDITION 2021-02-03T05:11:02Z australias-supply-chain-in-critical-condition - Ports start 2021 in critical condition, this is likely to be amplified by the impact of Chinese New Year- Global shipping currently experiencing unprecedented set of difficult circumstances such as severe delays, bypass of ports & more- Industry players left "holding the ball" in an attempt to navigate their way through numerous and unpredictable cargo movement issues- Australia's supply chain is vulnerable & a resolution needs to be established with industry and Government supportThere is no doubt that 2020 threw a harsh spotlight on the volatility of Australia’s supply chains. The COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the global marketplace, combined with the Industrial Action taken by the Maritime Union of Australia, has seen ports around the country start 2021 in critical condition. A condition that is likely to be amplified until at least mid-February due to the impact of Chinese New Year. With 98% of Australia’s trade is conducted via our ports and over 8 million containers of products destined for homes and businesses around the country every year, the question has to be asked: Who pays the ultimate price? Is it the every day Australian consumer? According to Rachael Budd, CEO of logistics firm, Transolve Global, global shipping is currently experiencing an unprecedented set of difficult circumstances, including severe delays, ports being bypassed, interrupted services, lack of capacity for containers and more. She elaborates; “Australia is an import-dominant nation; many of the items we buy are produced in other countries and arrive here via ships at our ports. Unfortunately due to the impact of COVID-19 on the global market place, plus a lengthy Industrial Action dispute, the ports are continually facing significant issues such as delays, interruptions, congestion and more. For example, we now have limited vessels coming into Sydney. This impacts our exports, as this cargo is unable to reach its overseas markets. It also affects imports as we are unable to receive normal supply.” The consequences of this ongoing situation will inevitably reverberate through different parts of the Australian community. At a consumer level, there is the real risk of stock shortages, as well as increased prices, whilst at a macro-level the lack of efficiency and competitiveness amongst shipping companies will be detrimental to our post COVID-19 economic recovery. According to Rachael, many industry players have been left holding the ball trying to navigate their way through the numerous cargo movement issues to ensure that imports and exports reach their intended destinations and customers. And with different shipping companies and airlines changing the landscape daily, it is becoming increasingly difficult to proactively plan the logistics. Rachael adds, “Last year uncovered how vulnerable Australia is with regards to our supply chain. Moving forward it is clear that the industry, Government and other relevant parties need to strategically and proactively plan how to manage and/or mitigate the impact of any unexpected global disruptions to all areas of Australia’s economy, including shipping lines, airlines and our ports. This will enable our supply chains to be competitive, productive and resilient well into the future, helping to ensure our economic growth.”About Rachael Budd: CEO of Transolve Global. Her proven expertise well qualifies her to provide insight and comment on this issue. She founded Transolve Global over 15 years ago, and has offices in Australia, New Zealand and USA. She has worked with a raft of clients across numerous industries including ROBE (Riverina Oils & Bio Energy), BWS, Dan Murphy’s, Treasury Wine Estates, ExxonMobil and more. ENDMedia EnquiriesSusan PopovskiThe Tale AgencyMob: 0410548103susan@thetaleagency.com Grasping at seaweed 2021-01-28T14:35:22Z grasping-at-seaweed Dear Editor, The dairy industry, drowning under public scrutiny of its woeful animal welfare record and environmental destructiveness, is no longer clutching at straws, but instead is grasping seaweed. Dairy Australia, the industry’s propaganda arm, is paying for advertorials about the wonders of feeding cows red algae, or Asparagopsis, in order to reduce the obscene amount of the very potent greenhouse gas methane, which is released in their belches and farts. Their no doubt conservative estimate is that this makes up 57% of farm emissions. MLA and others are saying that “If 10% of the livestock producers added 1.0% of Asparagopsis Seaweed Meal to the daily feed intake of ruminant livestock, it is like removing 100 million cars off the road.” What that figure shows is the extent of the problem caused by this industry, which survives by tearing babies from their mothers and selling the milk excreted for them to make products that we know are terrible for the health of the human consumer. If ten percent of “livestock” producers could easily remove greenhouse gases equivalent to 100 million cars, imagine what closing down this cruel and toxic industry could achieve! Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Vaccine priorities 2021-01-26T01:45:04Z vaccine-priorities Dear Editor, I am turning 69 soon, so I am not used to being told I am too young for - anything much. But according to the government’s rollout plan, I will be too young for the Phase 1 vaccine, which will be mostly the Pfizer dose, and will have to wait for Phase 2, which may be the less effective AstraZeneca jab. Who’s getting Phase 1? Quarantine, healthcare, aged care and disability workers – quite right! Indigenous people over 55 and others over 70. Fine. High-risk workers – police, fire, defence and emergency services – yes, and give them a medal too. And meat processing workers – wait, what? Killing animals is miserable, dangerous and poorly paid work in settings ideal for contagion, but it is certainly not an essential industry. The result of shutting down slaughterhouses and retraining the workers would be reduced pollution, improved public health and the end to the terror and agony of millions of animals every day. And because we know that around 75% of recently emerging infectious diseases affecting humans are transmitted from other species, and factory farms and slaughterhouses are ideal environments for propagation of new strains, we might just avoid unleashing the next pandemic too. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Free speech should be free 2021-01-11T13:31:37Z free-speech-should-be-free Dear Editor, Great to see the Deputy Prime Minister declaring his fervent support for freedom of speech, following the Twitter bans in the USA. We wait with bated breath for his announcement that he will now fight to repeal all the “ag-gag” laws that the Federal and State governments have been enacting, the purpose of which is to deny free speech to those seeking to expose extreme examples of animal cruelty, neglect and violations of animal protection laws on Australian farms. If we are one and free, let’s also be consistent and caring. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au