The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2021-07-26T07:01:55Z WATERCORE water softeners : Ion-Exchange and Nanofiltration (membrane softening). Which will work best for you? 2021-07-26T07:01:55Z watercore-water-softeners-ion-exchange-and-nanofiltration-membrane-softening-which-will-work-best-for-you Hardness in water is the sum of the concentrations of Calcium and Magnesium. Other ions produce hardness too: Iron, Manganese, Strontium, Barium, Zinc, and Aluminum, however these ions are generally not present in significant quantities and are not included when measuring water hardness.Hardness is generally expressed in units of milligrams per liter (mg/L) as Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3). An expression also used to define hardness in the context of ion-exchange water softeners is grains per gallon (1 grain per gallon of hardness is equal to 17.1 mg/L as CaCO3).Carbonates and Sulphates of Calcium and Magnesium tend to precipitate as hard deposits on the surfaces of pipes and heat exchanging surfaces. As a result, the resulting build-up of cement-like scale tends to restrict the water flow inside the pipes. In boilers, for example, the deposits act as an insulation that impairs the flow of heat into water, reducing the heating efficiency and allowing the metal boiler components to overheat. In cooling towers, these precipitates are responsible for a decrease in airflow through the tower and if not corrected, can seriously reduce the tower’s performance. In general, most commercial and industrial plants such as boilers, cooling towers, car washes, laundries etc need soft water. As a result, water softeners are common in the treatment of surface and well water supplies for these industries.Watercore design, manufacture and service industrial and commercial water softeners using two different water treatment plants:ION-EXCHANGE RESIN FILTER: Resin or ion exchange water treatment replaces Calcium and Magnesium ions with Sodium. Basically the incoming water passes through a resin filter and the resin ‘traps’ the Calcium ions, or limescale, from the solution and exchanges them for ions of sodium. As Sodium has a higher solubility than Calcium or Magnesium in water, this exercise translates into higher water quality.MEMBRANE / NANOFILTRATION SYSTEMS: In contrast to the ion exchange softeners, Nanofiltration softeners use low-pressure Nanofiltration membranes, similar to reverse osmosis membranes, to remove bivalent ions from water. As a rule of thumbs these type of commercial and industrial water softening membranes reject 99.8% of sulfate and bivalent ions while passing other components, particularly monovalent ions such as Chloride and Sodium, allowing for ultra-low-pressure operations.Choosing and sizing and the best water softener will depend on a number of factors including hardness of the water, volumes of water used, flow rate required and type of application. However our technical sales team are available to help you with all aspects of design, from the sizing of the unit to the best and most practical location. Funding for farmer challenge helps promote agriculture 2021-07-22T09:06:02Z funding-for-farmer-challenge-helps-promote-agriculture Thirteen agricultural shows and related youth groups across Australia have received grant funding via the new Australian Young Farmer Challenge (AYFC) Regional Grant Program.An initiative of the peak body for the 580 agricultural shows across the nation, Agricultural Shows Australia, the grant program helps shows invest in the spectacle of a ‘young farmer challenge’ which is a showcase of young people in Australian agriculture competing in diverse and colourful challenges testing skill, technique, knowledge and safety practices.Held at agricultural shows across the country, young farmer challenges can involve changing tyres, driving tractors, handling alpacas, identifying cattle breeds, putting out fires, torniqueing faux snakes bites, erecting fences and myriad other farming tasks in teams, against the clock and in front of a crowd. Agricultural Shows Australia executive officer Katie Stanley said the Australian Young Farmer Challenge Regional Grant Program required successful recipients to outline their plans for a sustainable competition in their local area or across their state.“These competitions allow young rural people to take centre stage with their mates in front of the crowds at agricultural shows, while demonstrating the diverse skills needed to be a modern farmer. “Shows use this competition to entertain crowds whilst being an educational showcase of young people in agriculture,” she said.Ms Stanley said the grants are supporting the costs of organising and running competitions at a local, regional and state level across Australia.The 2020/21 grant program awarded over $75,000 in sponsorship impacting over 40 competitions at different shows over the next 18months.“These competitions provide entertainment and crowd engagement as well education for the broader community about agriculture, food and more specifically, the role of farmers and farm safety.”“The purpose of the program is to support the sharing of knowledge, encourage community initiatives and promote community leadership,” she said.The successful applicants listed below have received funding for a range of projects including challenge equipment and trailers to facilitate equipment sharing.The Ag Group South Coast & Tablelands including shows in Albion Park, Berry, Bowral, Bulli, Camden, Dapto, Kangaroo Valley, Kiama, Milton, Moss Vale, Nowra, Picton and Robertson in NSWTenterfield Show Society in New South WalesAgricultural Societies Council of NSW - Group 3 which includes shows in Bulahdelah, Gosford, Cessnock, Dungog, Gresford, Maitland, Merriwa, Morisset Lake Macquarie, Newcastle, Singleton, Stroud, Upper Hunter and Wyong Shire in New South WalesKempsey Show Society in New South WalesTaree Show Society in New South WalesBellinger River Agricultural Show Society in New South WalesGatton Show Society in QueenslandEmerald Show Society in QueenslandThe South Australian Agricultural Shows Next Generation Group Mundulla Show in South AustraliaParndana Show in South AustraliaThe Royal Agricultural Society of VictoriaThe Royal Agricultural Society of Western Australia’s next generation group“We encourage all those interested in participating in any of these young farmer challenges, or shows planning on hosting a competition to reach out to their state ag show body or Agricultural Shows Australia,” Ms Stanley concluded.The project is jointly funded by Agricultural Shows Australia and the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment’s Building Landcare Community and Capacity component of the National Landcare Program. To find your local Challenge, visit https://agshowsaustralia.org.au/ ENDSFor more information, contact Agricultural Shows Australia Project Officer Georgia Clark on projectofficer@agshowsaustralia.org.au or 0402 571 494.About Agricultural Shows AustraliaAgricultural Shows of Australia (ASA) was established to promote the role and significance of Australian agricultural shows to the wider community. ASA’s vision is a strong and vibrant network of agricultural shows working together to engage, influence and promote the essential value of Australian agriculture. The membership of the ASA is made up of capital city Royal Agricultural Societies and state-based agricultural show bodies, together representing over 580 agricultural shows. National young judges, paraders and rural ambassadors finals postponed 2021-07-21T10:15:09Z national-young-judges-paraders-and-rural-ambassadors-finals-postponed Agricultural Shows of Australia regrets to inform that the national finals for young judges, young paraders and rural ambassadors will be postponed, and will not be held at the upcoming Royal Queensland Show in August as planned. Following a meeting of the working groups and organising committees of Agricultural Shows of Australia and the host body Queensland Ag Shows yesterday, the unanimous decision was made that the national finals for 2021 would not be conducted in conjunction with the 2021 Royal Queensland Show (Ekka)."The increasing uncertainty around the ability of interstate competitors and officials was the major consideration. With that in mind, the joint committee decided that it was not possible to proceed with the 2021 campaign in the current location," Chairman of Agricultural Shows of Australia, Rob Wilson said."Given our duty of care when conducting these competitions, the uncertainty around border restrictions and quarantine requirements, and the possible adverse impacts to finances and the wellbeing of competitors, supporters and organising committees were catalysts for this decision."Queensland Ag Shows confirmed that the Queensland State Young Judges and Paraders, Rural Ambassador and Showgirl competitions will continue as normal at the Ekka this year."The enormous amount of preparation has gone into these national finals - and the achievements of those 63 eligible national competitors across the nine competitions will not go to waste. We have every intention of staging these important competitions in the future."This announcement affects the state winners who were eligible as national competitors in the young judges competitions for poultry, alpacas, Merino sheep, Merino fleece, meat sheep breeds, dairy and beef cattle, paraders in dairy and beef cattle competitions and rural ambassadors.The joint committees will reconvene on 6 August to consider the options and communicate to finalists and officials thereafter. END ‘Unstoppable’ National Group at forefront of mine-equipment supply 2021-07-18T23:54:07Z unstoppable-national-group-at-forefront-of-mine-equipment-supply Written by Tony Featherstone. As featured in Australian Resources & Investment Magazine, August/September 2021 Edition. Mining-services star Mark Ackroyd has had a front-row view of mining cycles for decades. As founder and CEO of National Group – a leading equipment supplier to tier-one mining companies – Ackroyd understands the challenges of resource-sector volatility.  Over the years, Ackroyd has watched mining companies buy expensive equipment when commodity prices rise. Then, when the cycle inevitably turns, companies are left with depreciating mining equipment, hurting their balance sheet and cash flow.  “There’s never been a more important time to rent rather than buy mining equipment,” says Ackroyd. “Commodity-price volatility is rising and external forces, such as Covid and Chinese bans are adding to uncertainty. Long-term dry hire of earthmoving equipment has become a highly attractive option as the mining industry has grown, and as more companies transition to an owner-miner model (versus contract operators).”  Ackroyd says mining companies should heed lessons from the 2008-09 Global Financial Crisis. “The GFC fallout reinforced the benefits of mining companies keeping more capital in reserve for unforeseen circumstances. Renting mining equipment from a trusted supplier, such as National Group, reduces financial and operational risks, and frees up cash flow.”  Renting equipment also provides a scaleable solution for mining companies wanting to increase production or expand mine-site operations, says Ackroyd. “They can use the equipment for a period and give it back when it is no longer required. Also, renting equipment aids their budgeting and allows better fleet customisation for their needs.”  Buying heavy earthmoving equipment is a large capital expense. An extra-large excavator can cost up to $18 million, weigh up to 800 tonnes and take 18 months to manufacture. “Mining companies can quickly rent equipment from National Group, rather than wait longer periods for equipment to be manufactured, as is the case now during Covid,” says Ackroyd.  Innovative approach  Ackroyd’s “long view” on mining cycles is embedded in National Group’s DNA. “From day one, our focus has been to build and maintain long-term relationships with top mining companies,” he says. “We understand their needs and work closely with them through all stages of the mining cycle. Many of our clients have been with National Group for years or decades.”  This focus on long-term relationships is captured in National Group’s reputation as “unstoppable”. The Queensland-based company prides itself on achieving consistent results for clients in all market and project conditions – and on its fleet durability.  From humble beginnings in 1997, National Group has become one of Australia’s great privately owned mining-services companies. Since launching, its equipment (through National Plant & Equipment) has been used throughout Australia, across a range of commodities and locations, by the world’s top resource companies.  From one bulldozer at launch, National Group has built a fleet of more than 350 units of heavy earthmoving equipment.  This includes excavators, dump trucks, dozers, graders, loaders, compactors, water trucks and other earthmoving vehicles. New units are consistently added, giving National Group one of Australia’s best earthmoving fleets.  New fleet additions include CAT 24 Motor Graders, CAT 6040 Excavators and CAT D11 Dozers. National Group has fleet-wide availability of more than 90 per cent. Equipment can be rented for up to 700 operating hours per month, per unit – on a 12-month, two or three-year basis. Clients can choose fully maintained rental solutions, where National Group services and repairs units, or do it themselves through a self-maintained option.  The company also provides hire-to-buy options for clients that are considering buying mining equipment but want to free up capital in the short term.  Ackroyd is proud of National Group’s past and excited by its future. “The mining sector continues to grow, even during the pandemic. The five-year outlook is promising. National Group has an important role to keep supplying equipment and help our mining sector create more jobs and wealth for Australia.” Further Information Click here for more news from the National Group. About National Group The National Group comprises of leading companies from the mining, resource, transport and logistics industries. Servicing some of the biggest names in mining and with an excellent track record, the National Group has built a reputation as being ‘unstoppable’ in heavy earthmoving equipment and provides end-to-end production mining services. Bringing the best young beef brains in Australia together 2021-07-10T08:52:19Z bringing-the-best-young-beef-brains-in-australia-together Australia and New Zealand’s seven sharpest young beef cattle judges and the most skilled beef cattle paraders have been announced today by Agricultural Shows of Australia (ASA) as eligible to compete in the national finalists of the prestigious annual competition to be judged next month.National finalist beef cattle judges:18 year old James Wasley of Dandaragan will represent Western Australia. 18 year old Mackenzie Leeson of Moura will represent Queensland. 16 year old Grace Burns of Towamba will represent New South Wales.24 year old Courtney Davies of Auckland is the representative for New Zealand.18 year old Angus Llewellyn of Keith will represent South Australia. 21 year old Sarah Sutton of Sulky will represent Victoria. 25 year old Alice Hall of Scottsdale will represent Tasmania. National finalist beef cattle paraders:24 year old Rachel Williams of Albany will represent Western Australia. 17 year old Maya Threlfall of Tully will represent Queensland. 24 year old Tayla Miller of Parkville will represent New South Wales. 21 year old Cara Doggett of Palmerston North is the representative for New Zealand.21 year old Alizah Fogden of Loxton will represent South Australia. 17 year old Lochie McLauchlan Glenormiston North will represent Victoria. 21 year old Demi Bird of Sheffield will represent Tasmania. Dr. Rob Wilson is chairman of ASA, the peak body overseeing 572 agricultural shows in Australia which attract six million visitors annually and contribute nearly $1billion to the national economy, and says the competition is designed to recognise the best new talent in livestock judging and presenting nationwide.“It’s an extremely prestigious event and positions at the nationals are keenly contested,” Dr. Wilson explains.“These young people are the future of agricultural show competitions which are crucial to the continual improvement of Australia’s food and fibre. The national competition is a coveted opportunity to grow personally and professionally by practising skills against the cream of the crop.”The national competition is held in a different location each year to promote livestock judging, parading and the industry as widely as possible throughout Australia. This year it will be hosted by Queensland Ag Shows at the 143rd Royal Queensland Show (the “Ekka”), Brisbane from 7-9 August 2021.Queensland Ag Shows president Kerri Robertson explained that in a beef cattle judging competition it is important for the assessor to relate the form of the animal to its function.“Livestock producers, breeders, feeders and buyers all judge and evaluate livestock for their potential as either breeding or market animals,” Mr Robertson explained.“The task of judging is a subjective one, based on selected production systems and changing market conditions. Entrants use their skills to adjudicate the placings of the stock and then must articulate their approach.”The beef cattle paraders competition is designed to determine who most effectively presents and parades an animal before a competition judge.“Competitors have one hour to prepare their animal for presentation at judging. They have to wash, clip, groom and then finally parade the animal before the judge.”Overall there are nine categories for judging and parading each year under the ASA national competition program: beef cattle, dairy cattle, alpaca, poultry, Merino sheep, meat sheep breed and Merino fleece judging, as well as parading competitions in beef and dairy cattle.Previous national winners of the national beef cattle judging competition are Georgia Whitworth in 2019 representing New Zealand, Harris Thompson in 2018 representing Western Australia, Damon Englund in 2017 representing Tasmania, Sarah Peters in 2016 representing Queensland, Jonty Hemmingway in 2015 representing New South Wales, Nancy Crawshaw in 2014 representing New Zealand, Jake Phillips in 2013 representing SA, Kurt Wise in 2012 representing Western Australia, Erin Goldsworthy in 2011 representing New South Wales, Samantha Atkinson in 2010 representing Victoria, Natalie Burke in 2009 representing Western Australia, and Tania Hartwig in 2008 representing Queensland.Previous winners of the national beef cattle paraders competition are Sam Parish in 2019 representing New South Wales, Mason Galpin in 2018 representing South Australia, Pyper Page in 2017 representing Tasmania, Ruby Canning in 2016 representing Victoria, Nicole Muller in 2015 representing South Australia, Madalan Page in 2014 representing Tasmania, Nicole Hartwig in 2013 representing Queensland, Maddie Jonas in 2012 representing South Australia, Jemma Robertson in 2011 representing New South Wales, Stephanie Frankham in 2010 representing New South Wales, Kate Murfett in 2009 representing Tasmania and Patrick Halloran in 2008 representing Victoria.[END]For more information about the competition head to agshowsaustralia.org.au/youth-in-agriculture/national-young-judges. ASA will issue a press release to announce the results as soon as they are announced. Media are welcome to attend the national finals. Meet Australia’s best young meat sheep judges 2021-07-05T00:52:58Z meet-australias-best-young-meat-sheep-judges Agricultural Shows of Australia (ASA) today announced the seven national finalists in the prestigious annual meat sheep young judges competition.The competition brings together the best young meat sheep judges aged from 15 to 25 in each state to compete at the national finals.Qualification for the national finals is via success in regional and state competitions.- 19 year old Brendan Lamont from Tambellup will be representing Western Australia. - 24 year old Georgia Lee from Harristown will be representing Queensland. - 20 year old Reece Webster from White Rock will be representing New South Wales. - 17 year old Tayla Hansen from Taupiri will be representing New Zealand.- 18 year old Tom Megson from Kanmantoo will be representing South Australia. - 17 year old Erin Douglas from Mornington will be representing Victoria. Erin is a state finalist in two competitions.- 21 year old Molly Cornish from Bridport will be representing Tasmania.Dr. Rob Wilson is chairman of ASA, the peak body overseeing 572 agricultural shows in Australia which attract six million visitors annually and contribute nearly $1billion to the national economy, and says the competition is designed to recognise the best new talent in livestock judging nationwide.“It’s an extremely prestigious event and positions at the nationals are keenly contested,” Dr. Wilson explains.“These young people are the future of agricultural show competitions which are crucial to the continual improvement of Australia’s food and fibre. The national competition is a coveted opportunity to grow personally and professionally by practising skills against the cream of the crop.”The national competition is held in a different location each year to promote livestock judging, parading and the industry as widely as possible throughout Australia. This year it will be hosted by Queensland Ag Shows at the 143rd Royal Queensland Show (the “Ekka”), Brisbane from 7-9 August 2021.Queensland Ag Shows president Kerri Robertson explained that, in a meat sheep judging competition, it is important for the assessor to relate the form of the animal to its function.“Livestock producers, breeders, feeders and buyers all judge and evaluate livestock for their potential as either breeding or market animals,” Mr Robertson explained.“The task of judging is a subjective one, based on selected production systems and changing market conditions. It is important that entrants are able to use their skills and articulate their approach. Our goal is to expand the knowledge and skills foundations of the entrants, helping them as youthful individuals to develop their careers.”Overall there are nine categories for judging and parading each year under the ASA national competition program: beef cattle, dairy cattle, alpaca, poultry, Merino sheep, meat sheep breed and Merino fleece judging, as well as parading competitions in beef and dairy cattle.Previous national winners of the meat sheep young judges competition include Keiran Smith in 2019 representing NSW, Lachlan Grossman in 2018 representing SA, Joanna Balcombe in 2017 representing NSW, Emma-Jane Lovell in 2016 representing NSW, Emma Skinner in 2015 representing VIC, Erin Lee in 2014 representing QLD, Robert Gregory in 2013 representing NZ, Andrew Herron in 2012 representing QLD, Ellie Quinn in 2011 representing WA, Matthew Jones in 2010 representing NSW, Bayden Reid in 2009 representing WA and Kate Jordan in 2008 representing NZ. [END]For more information about the competition head to agshowsaustralia.org.au/youth-in-agriculture/national-young-judgesASA will issue a press release to announce the results as soon as they are announced. Media are welcome to attend the national finals. Australia’s most talented young judges of Merino sheep 2021-07-04T09:59:39Z australias-most-talented-young-judges-of-merino-sheep Agricultural Shows of Australia (ASA) today announced the seven national finalists in the prestigious annual Merino sheep young judges competition, sponsored by Australian Wool Innovation.The competition brings together the best young Merino sheep judges aged from 15 to 25 in each state to compete.Dr. Rob Wilson is chairman of ASA, the peak body overseeing the 572 agricultural shows in Australia which attract six million visitors annually and contribute nearly $1billion to the national economy, and says the competition is designed to recognise and support the best new talent in judging livestock nationwide.“It’s an extremely prestigious event and positions at the nationals are keenly contested,” Dr. Wilson explains.“These young people are the future of agricultural show competitions which are crucial to the continual improvement of Australia’s food and fibre. The national competition is a coveted opportunity to grow personally and professionally by practising skills against the cream of the crop.”The national competition is held in a different location each year to promote livestock judging, parading and the industry as widely as possible throughout Australia. This year it will be hosted by Queensland Ag Shows at the 143rd Royal Queensland Show (the “Ekka”), Brisbane from 7-9 August 2021.Queensland Ag Shows president Kerri Robertson explained that, in a Merino sheep judging competition, young judges assess four ewes and four rams against the standard of what is considered a good Merino type.“The task of judging is a subjective one, based on selected production systems and changing market conditions. It is important that entrants are able to use their skills and articulate their approach. Our goal is to expand the knowledge and skills foundations of the entrants, helping them as youthful individuals to develop their careers,” Ms Robertson said.Australian Wool Innovation’s Chief Operating Officer John Roberts says AWI is proud to support the competition.“Australian wool has a bright future so it needs the best in the brightest to stay interested and involved in this great industry that’s why we are so pleased to back the annual Merino sheep young judges competition. And may the best judge win,” Mr Roberts said.Overall there are nine categories for judging and parading each year under the ASA national competition program: beef cattle, dairy cattle, alpaca, poultry, Merino sheep, meat sheep breed and Merino fleece judging, as well as parading competitions in beef and dairy cattle.Qualification for the national finals is via success in regional and state competitions.19 year old Kurt Richards of Dowerin will represent Western Australia.21 year old Will Hacker of “Roselea” Muckadilla will represent Queensland.16 year old Campbell Rubie of Forbes will represent New South Wales.24 year old Robbie Harper of Cheviot is the successful representative for New Zealand.24 year old Klay Smith of Cowell will represent South Australia.21 year old Ben Hartwich of Bullygrogran (Ararat) will represent Victoria.18 year old Sym Hood of Longford will represent Tasmania.Previous national winners of the Merino sheep young judges competition include Clark Stackhouse (TAS) 2019, Adam Bennett (VIC) 2018, Matthew Baker (QLD) 2017, Lachie Brumpton (QLD) 2016, Charlie Brumpton (QLD) 2015, Felicity Brumpton (QLD) 2014, John Dalla (SA) 2013, Rick Wise (WA) 2012 and 2010, Ben Simmons (NSW) 2011, Henric Nicholas (TAS) 2009, and Ryan Weir (VIC) 2008.[END]For more information about the competition head to agshowsaustralia.org.au/youth-in-agriculture/national-young-judgesASA will issue a press release to announce the results as soon as they are announced. Media are welcome to attend the national finals. Finding the nation’s finest young fleece judge 2021-07-02T04:59:48Z finding-the-nations-finest-young-fleece-judge Agricultural Shows of Australia (ASA) today announced the seven national finalists in the prestigious annual Merino fleece young judges competition, sponsored by Australian Wool Innovation.The competition brings together the best young Merino fleece judges aged from 15 to 25 in each state. Dr Rob Wilson is chairman of ASA, the peak body overseeing the 572 agricultural shows in Australia which attract six million visitors annually and contribute nearly $1billion to the national economy, and says the competition is designed to recognise and support the best new talent in judging livestock nationwide.“It’s an extremely prestigious event and positions at the nationals are keenly contested,” Dr Wilson explains. “These young people are the future of agricultural show competitions which are crucial to the continual improvement of Australia’s food and fibre. The national competition is a coveted opportunity to grow personally and professionally by practising skills against the cream of the crop.”The national competition is held in a different location each year to promote livestock judging, parading and the industry as widely as possible throughout Australia. This year it will be hosted by Queensland Ag Shows at the 143rd Royal Queensland Show (the “Ekka”), Brisbane from 7 -9 August 2021.Queensland Ag Shows president Kerri Robertson explained that, in a Merino fleece competition, young judges assess the style, uniformity of length, yield, handle, colour or bloom and crimp formation of the wool. “Entrants are asked to outline their reasons for placing the animals and justify their positions. Participants demonstrate skills in communication, public speaking, fleece and industry specific knowledge,” Ms Robertson said. “The task of judging is a subjective one, based on selected production systems and changing market conditions. It is important that entrants are able to use their skills and articulate their approach. Our goal is to expand the knowledge and skills of the entrants, helping them as youthful individuals to develop their careers.”Overall there are nine categories for judging and parading each year under the ASA national competition program: beef cattle, dairy cattle, alpaca, poultry, Merino sheep, meat sheep breed and Merino fleece judging, as well as parading competitions in beef and dairy cattle. Australian Wool Innovation’s Chief Operating Officer John Roberts says AWI is proud to support the competition.“Australian wool has a bright future so it needs the best in the brightest to stay interested and involved in this great industry that’s why we are so pleased to back the annual Merino fleece young judges competition. And may the best judge win,” Mr Roberts said.Qualification for the national finals is via success in regional and state competitions.23 year old Hayden Baker of Katanning will represent Western Australia. Read about Hayden here.21 year old Will Hacker of "Roselea" Muckadilla will represent Queensland. Read about Will here. 22 year old Matilda Scott of Cleveland will represent Tasmania. Read about Matilda here.19 year old Sophie Nuske of Port Lincoln will represent South Australia. Read about Sophie here.18 year old Clarissa Peasley of Condobolin/Forbes will represent New South Wales. Read about Clarissa here.18 year old Erin Douglas of Mornington will represent Victoria. Read about Erin here. 19 year old Niamh Barnett of Dannevirke is the successful competitor for New Zealand.Previous national winners of the Merino fleece competition include Stephanie Davies of NSW in 2019, Stuart Richardson of WA in 2018, Caitlin Hepner of SA in 2017, Brooke Sewell of NSW in 2016, Angus Dawson of NSW in 2015, Tara Clarke of SA in 2014, Jessica Perrin of NZ in 2013, Will Gibson of WA in 2012, Allycia Bennett of QLD in 2011, Rick Wise of WA in 2010, Kurt Wise of WA in 2009 and Belinda Reardon of TAS in 2008.[END]ASA will issue a press release with the results as soon as they are announced. Media are welcome to attend the national finals. For more information about the competition head to https://agshowsaustralia.org.au/youth-in-agriculture/national-young-judges/ Iron Removal from Bore Water: Aeration VS Chemical Oxidation before Filtration 2021-06-28T05:10:27Z iron-removal-from-bore-water-aeration-vs-chemical-oxidation-before-filtration Iron removal is a common treatment for commercial industrial and drinking applications. Iron and Manganese in their oxidized forms can contribute to suspended solids in water. Found as dissolved ions in many underground water sources, Iron and Manganese become insoluble solids after oxidation when in contact with Oxygen present in surface waters. Australian bore groundwater can contain soluble Iron and oxidised Iron as hydroxides and oxides. Bore water often contains high levels of soluble iron which is oxidised and forms particles when in contact with the dissolved oxygen in water. Iron concentrations in bore water typically range from 0-10.0 mg/L, but 20 mg/L or higher are not uncommon.  Manganese is much less common, and typically ranges from 0-2.0 mg/L. In general terms and when present in low to medium concentration levels in drinking water, Iron does not represent a risk to health or environment. However it brings unpleasant metallic taste and colour to the water flow.  In commercial and industrial environments Iron has a much bigger impact: Iron will deposit on surfaces and cause corrosion, overheating problems, clogs and blockages. Iron deposits on the heat transfer surfaces are typically hard, dense and porous and accelerate corrosion while generate an insulating effect that prevents heat transfer and causes the temperature of metals to increase. Dissolved Iron removal involves converting it into non-dissolved particles that can be removed by standard filtration methods. Treated water can have an Iron content as little as 0.01 ppm, which qualifies for membrane filtration systems such as reverse osmosis, nanofiltration or ultrafiltration.  Dissolved Iron cannot be filtered easily so the common practice consists of transforming it into the undissolved form and then remove the particle flocks by filtration. Hence, removal of Iron from water is divided in two separate stages: Oxidation and precipitation of dissolved ferrous Iron into particulate Ferric Iron (hydroxide). Removal of precipitated Iron particles by means of media filtration  The oxidation stage can also be carried out by: Aeration in cascades or spraying open-air systems similar to cooling towers Chemical dosing of stronger oxidants such as Chlorine or Potassium Permanganate   Aeration requires a significant footprint but is easy with low running costs other than the initial investment. It also helps removing aggressive CO2 and with Hydrogen Sulfide removal.  Oxidation by means of chemical dosing is faster than aeration and very effective regardless of the iron content in water, however operational costs will be higher and chemical handling will be a part of the process. Depending on the iron concentration found in the bore water and the PH of that water, it may be possible to use only aeration to oxidase and precipitate the iron before filtration. Both iron and manganese can always be oxidised with aeration, however the kinetics of this reaction depend heavily on the pH.  Below a pH of 7, oxidation by aeration is very slow and requires a long contact time (more than 30 min). Although this process is chemically possible, it is not economically viable. Iron oxidation occurs best within a pH range of 7.5-8, where aeration can take place in around 10 min. At Watercore, our team of bore water Iron filtration experts can point you in the right direction in regards to the best possible option for your iron removal. Carbon Farming helping drought-proof Aussie farmers 2021-06-26T03:53:59Z carbon-farming-helping-drought-proof-aussie-farmers West Australian cattle property, Bulga Downs Station has become one of the first privately owned Australian farms to create and sell 125,000 carbon credits, two years after a Human Induced Regeneration (HIR) project was developed and implemented in partnership with RegenCo - a Natural Capital advisory and management company helping farmers to build a more financial and environmentally sustainable future. This is a terrific outcome for both the pastoralist and the environment, according RegenCo CEO, Dr. Tim Moore who confirmed the payment was issued through the Commonwealth Emission Reduction Fund (ERF) - providing carbon revenue valued in excess of $2 million at current market prices. “Carbon Farming and HIR practices allow farmers to be more profitable and implement infrastructure that will enhance their pastoral production resilience in dry times, while also reviving their land and capturing carbon,” said Dr. Moore. The 700,000-hectare Bulga Downs cattle property, located 340km north-west of Kalgoorlie, has been owned and operated by David McQuie and family since 1984. McQuie had been refining his farming systems for years, when the WA Government made its landmark decision in 2019, allowing Carbon Farming on pastoral lands. McQuie immediately began investigating the possibility and benefits of running HIR activities on his property. “I took my time looking at how HIR practices could improve the long-term productivity of my grazed country, while delivering a solid commercial return. RegenCo advised on our new pastoral management plan which allows us to run and improve our cattle herd and helps generate carbon credits,” McQuie said. The Bulga Downs HIR project, which will run for 25 years is expected to generate an estimated $36 million in carbon credit sales. Changes made to the property’s management as part of the regeneration project include the identification and establishment (fencing off) of suitable carbon farming areas, a reduction of cattle numbers grazing in these areas and the new watering points to help spread out grazing pressure. New total grazing management (TGM) yards will be installed in future years to further manage and disperse grazing pressure, and the preservation of strategic fire breaks will help protect the carbon regrowth areas. Carbon credits or Australian Carbon Credit Units (ACCU) are earned for each tonne of greenhouse gas emissions or a carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) that’s been sequestered through approved methods, such as HIR and reforestation projects. Like any commodity, an ACCU can be traded by producers, consumers or investors – with the Australian Government and large emitters the most active buyers in the market at the moment. The ERF operates through a reverse auction process, where producers like Bulga Downs and RegenCo submit bids to sell their ACCU’s, and sets the standard market cost.   While the carbon credits market is still emerging and remains largely difficult to access in Australia, this is expected to change as demand and awareness grows among farmers. “The Bulga Downs Station carbon credits were sold to the ERF, a Self-Managed Super Fund (SMSF) and through local trade-counter Jarden (accus.com.au). The current market rate sits at around $18.60 per ACCU, an almost 20% growth compared to 2019 prices. We’re confident strong growth will continue in coming years,” Moore predicts. “We believe that Agriculture can play a key role towards addressing climate change by reducing and offsetting carbon emissions while also supporting struggling farmers. We’re excited at the potential to replicate the Bulga Downs success across the country and help Australia achieve its emission reduction targets,” concluded Moore. ENDS Editors Notes: -        About RegenCo:   RegenCo is a South Australian based Natural Capital Specialist company that works in partnership with landholders to provide innovative financial and land management solutions for food and cattle production systems and climate protection.   Assisting with the research and development, registration and implementation of carbon and natural capital regeneration projects, RegenCo aims to help diversify farmers’ income by generating valuable carbon credits, while continuing to run farms and improve the land.   For more information about RegenCo visit:  https://regenco.earth/   -        About Dr. Tim Moore:   CEO and Founder of RegenCo, Dr. Tim Moore has 20 years of experience across natural resource management, conservation land management, carbon markets (buy and supply sides) and agribusiness innovation.   Tim’s expertise and knowledge lies in the science and methods of land management and practical implementation of Carbon Farming initiatives, and regularly provides advisory services to the WA, SA and NT Governments.    Connect with Dr. Moore on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/timnmoore/   -        Human Induced Regeneration (HIR):   Carbon farming is the process of changing farming practices or land use to increase the amount of carbon stored in the soil, trees and other plants, to reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere. HIR is one method of Carbon farming designed to encourage the regeneration of Australian native plant species, indigenous to a local area.   About 45% of Australia’s landmass is considered to be degraded Rangelands, which store less carbon in the soil and are therefore less productive. This land will only continue to degrade under a business-as-usual management. HIR practices can help these landowners increase the amount of carbon they store, and regenerate their land.   More information about HIR: https://bit.ly/3yHGwpx   -        Relevant Links: o   ERF Auction Results - http://www.cleanenergyregulator.gov.au/ERF/auctions-results/april-2021 o   Jarden Group - https://www.jardengroup.com.au/ and https://accus.com.au/ Download images: HERE Ag shows winners announced at NSW conference today 2021-06-19T03:36:42Z ag-shows-winners-announced-at-nsw-conference-today The most dedicated, resilient, innovative and excellent agricultural shows and their volunteers were recognised today at the NSW state conference themed “Adapt, Sustain, Grow”. Members of the 192 Shows in NSW joined in digitally from nine regional locations today including Armidale, Bathurst, Bomaderry, Dubbo, Goulburn, Narrandera, North Ryde, Port Macquarie and Singleton to hear from the likes of NSW Resilience commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons, experts on a variety of topics and case studies of success from within the show network. President of the Agricultural Societies Council of New South Wales, Tim Capp of Gresford, says these awards recognise people and show societies who have shown devotion, creativity and determination over the last year. “Millions of people go to our agricultural shows every year, and they’re almost entirely run by wonderful volunteers,” Mr Capp said. “These volunteers coordinate hundreds of competitions across vast categories from horses to alpacas, beef to bees, sheep to sewing as well as delivering education and entertainment. They orchestrate the largest local event in most towns, and have been bringing the entire community together whether it's for one day or three for well over a century in many areas.” Winner of the 2021 Dedication Award is Ross Matheson of Hawkesbury District Agricultural Association. “Ross is the president and has been a member of the association for over 40 years. His commitment is 365 days a year as the showground is an all-year business, hosting a range of events throughout the year,” Mr Capp said. “His contribution to the development of the showground from a bare tract of land in 1986 to one of the premier showground and event facilities in the Greater Western Region is noteworthy.” “Hawkesbury District Agricultural Association had an enormously successful comeback from covid cancellations, with record crowd numbers streaming through the gates.” Winner of the Excellence Award is Phillip Nankivell of Blayney Agricultural and Pastoral Association. “Phillip has been president of the show society since 1983 and does an outstanding job leading, encouraging, and guiding the committee. After covid lockdowns and show cancellations in 2020, Phillip was determined that there would be a show this year,” Mr Capp said. “Phillip has been central to improvements to the showground, the collaboration of different user groups and a fruitful relationship with the local council.” “He too has a vision around the inclusion of younger members, placing the show society in a good position for the future. Young stewards are shadowing senior stewards so they will gain the knowledge to continue staging successful shows in Blayney in years to come.” Mr Nankivell’s show society at Blayney alongside Mungindi Show won the President’s Innovation Award, sharing in $3500 as part of their win. Blayney Agricultural and Pastoral Association Inc has been recognised for their young judging student workshops and competition day. These are workshops run for students who learn about appraising and judging beef cattle, meat sheep, fleeces, grain judging, public speaking/judging talk formulation. The education section is followed by a young judges competition in the afternoon. “Blayney Show is a one day show. Over the years the beef cattle competition has grown so big that the cattle judging as well as the young paraders and beef judging competitions could not all be held on that day. So, for four years beef cattle competitions could not be held at the show, leaving a big gap for student education through the popular young judges competitions,” Mr Capp explained. “To bridge the gap and provide a learning event where students could develop skills, knowledge, and confidence to become engaged in young judges competitions, the show society partnered with the NSW DPI Schools Program to develop a young judging education day for local students.” “The first young judging student workshops and competition day was so successful it is now an annual event.” Mungindi Show Society has been recognised for their header and cotton picker demolition derby. “The demolition derby is an event like no other in NSW! A cotton picker and combine harvester duke it out at a demolition derby that was part of the annual Mungindi Show,” Mr Capp said. “The show society wanted to give the community an enjoyable event to lift spirits while also promoting local cotton and crop growers who provide their machinery and time to support the annual show. They invented the header and cotton picker demolition derby and it was a huge attraction, generating increased gate takings.” “It provided interaction and entertainment featuring the region’s considerable cotton industry.” The winner of the Resilience Award is Woodstock Memorial Show, winning $2,000. The Woodstock Memorial Show was cancelled in 2020 due to the pandemic, but a group of volunteers investigated alternative options for events to be run virtually to keep the community connected. “The Show Society remained connected by maintaining their presence, connecting with their patrons, promoting their sponsors, and engaging with a new audience for very little cost,” President of the state’s peak ag show body, Tim Capp, said. “To help sponsors struggling during lockdown, the show society created a digital market stall on their website and promoted it on social media.” Show sections were also digitised. Surprisingly, a record number of entries were received. “A Father’s Day photographic competition, online best dressed pets - many of which were purchased during lockdown, and a trail of scarecrows on the showground for people to drive by and admire proved successful initiatives.”Today, 300 members of show societies across NSW joined in to the state conference.[END] PROXA Water to Supply Much Needed Treated Water 2021-06-18T04:05:51Z proxa-water-to-supply-much-needed-treated-water PROXA Water has recently won two separate contracts with an Australian council to provide a Multimedia (MMF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) water treatment plant from its AQUAMOBILE range of containerised water treatment systems. The RO water treatment plant will treat bore water for irrigation use. The site operates a number of Aquifer Storage Recovery schemes for long term water storage and has permanent on site equipment, including bore pumps, large surface storage tanks, distribution pumps, chemical disinfection, and flow/quality monitoring instruments. This rental contract sees PROXA supplying a fully automated, remote monitored, containerised RO plant, complete with pre-filtration and CIP cleaning system with a nominal production capacity of 1.25 MLD. . This RO plant will allow up to 1,500,000 litres of irrigation water to be produced each day. This Australian project will be supplied on a rental basis for a 24-month period, which includes delivery and installation support at site, and is supplied under a full operations and maintenance rental agreement, including remote monitoring, supply of chemicals, consumables, spares and other services as required for the contracted period. The AQUAMOBILE RO plant is on site and ready to be commissioned over the coming weeks. PROXA Australia has also been contracted to supply 2 x fully-automated containerised AQUAMOBILE MMF (Multimedia Filtration) Plants for stormwater treatment at another of the client’s locations. The combined system of two MMF units is guaranteed to produce filtered water at a turbidity of less than 10NTU. This MMF plant is on a 24-month fixed term contract, with full operations and maintenance support, including remote monitoring, supply of chemicals, consumables, spare parts and other services as required for the contracted period. This MMF plant will be commissioned in July 2021. Both AQUAMOBILE plants will utilise PROXA’s proprietarty Q-TRAK technology, allowing complete remote access & operations of the plants. Enabling these systems with this technology not only generates operational flexibility and maximises plant performance, but allows immediate response to plant downtime. The final chapter in farming family’s history closes, as the homestead is listed for sale 2021-06-16T15:21:56Z the-final-chapter-in-farming-familys-history-closes-as-the-homestead-is-listed-for-sale On the back of the sale of “Chain-O-Ponds”, a 828.1-hectare property in the Yass Valley, the final chapter in this farming family’s history is coming to a close, with the property’s last remaining portion holding the main homestead listed for sale.Last month Geoff and Michelle Fountain sold the farm – which was one of the last remaining large-scale properties left in the area - for $1,650,000 to a Sydney buyer.Now the property’s main homestead on 16 hectares, which was subdivided from the rest of the farm when Geoff took over from his parents Elizabeth and John, has hit the market as 94-year-old Elizabeth moves to Sydney to be closer to her daughter Carolyn.Elizabeth and John bought the property in 1969, making the tree-change from Sydney. Initially they lived in an existing cottage before John built the main homestead with a builder from Yass.With six teenage children, the Fountains built a large home designed with the family in mind. Incorporating open plan living, a billiard room, three bedrooms and study, the standout feature has to be the slate tiles throughout.“Dad laid the tiles himself,” Carolyn said. “They also made sure they could make the most of the country views with every single room in the house opening out via glass and timber French doors to the garden.”As the next generation came into the picture, a gable pitched granny flat, housing a loft, living space and bathroom, was built next to the homestead to accommodate the growing family.“Mum taught at the Gunning school and dad, an engineer by trade, ran the farm and was the Managing Director of Goulburn Wool Scours,” Carolyn reflects on her parents’ history on the property.“We had been living in Sydney, but they wanted to give up the busy city life for a quiet life in the country.”“If I was ever stressed out from Sydney, a weekend at ‘Chain o Ponds’ would do the trick; it was just so great to visit and go for walks in the bush and enjoy the peace and quiet.”“It was great we had the opportunity to have somewhere like that to take my kids and grandchildren. They loved helping Grandpa in the paddocks, working with the sheep and taking turns on the back of the motorbike.” “We have such fond memories of the kids making rafts on the dam next to the house, taking canoes out and picking fruit from the orchard.”“You hear of city kids who don’t know where milk comes from or for that matter many of the foods that come from farms, they think it comes from the supermarket, so it was special and important they could have that regular exposure to country life on weekends.”Agent George Southwell said it was the end of an era for the Fountain family who had been an integral part of the community for 50 years.“'Chain o Ponds’ was a wonderful place for the Fountains to raise their family, but the time has come for a new generation to take on this special homestead and create a new book of memories.”“Located only 30 minutes from Yass, 1-hour from Goulburn and 1.5 hours from Canberra, ‘Chain-O-Ponds Homestead’ offers peaceful, country living at its finest.”Agent: George Southwell +61 429 838 345 george.southwell@raywhite.com Chance to own the last piece of a family farm legacy 2021-06-16T15:15:16Z chance-to-own-the-last-piece-of-a-family-farm-legacy It’s not every day an Australian farming family surrenders a piece of its legacy, but in the tightly held Yass River, the last remaining portion of the Johnson family’s Merino property has hit the market – and it’s sure to capture the attention of tree changers and locals alike.The highly productive “Blue Gum Flats” was bought about a century ago when Tim Warden’s great-grandfather got word of his successful bid while shearing up north in Queensland.After clearing the land, leaving one paddock as a timber block, the family built a successful farming business that has been passed down through the generations.Now Tim has moved interstate, he has put the last remaining 66-hectare (163 acres) portion of the farm on the market.Free from any infrastructure and divided into seven paddocks, the property comprises native and improved pastures and a timber block with redgum, red box and stringy bark trees.“The timber block was used as a timber mill for a while, but is now just a firewood source, and the sandstone off the property was used in the farmhouse,” Tim said.Hidden away behind a hill, the secluded and private land is surrounded by a large acreage. Tim said it was “the best of the blocks” when the farm was subdivided.While located in a reliable rainfall area, Blue Gum Flats is also serviced by six good-sized dams and a creek and has been running 200 to 400 Merinos.Agent George Southwell said: “The property has so much potential, being located just 15 minutes from Yass, just over an hour from Canberra and about three hours from Sydney CBD; there is the opportunity to keep it as a hobby farm to run sheep, cattle or horses, or being a blank canvas, build the dream home."“There’s also the appeal to turn it into a weekender – or even just make the most of the creek running through it or the timber bush block for camping.”The time has come for this piece of family history to be passed on to start a new chapter in a family history book.Agent: George Southwell +61 429 838 345 george.southwell@raywhite.com Three finalists announced today in annual award for ag show excellence in NSW 2021-06-15T18:46:00Z three-finalists-announced-today-in-annual-award-for-ag-show-excellence-in-nsw The peak body for the 192 agricultural shows in New South Wales today announced three finalists in the annual recognition for individual excellence amongst the vast volunteer network.Agricultural Societies Council of New South Wales president Tim Capp says this award recognises a person who has made an outstanding contribution to the show movement in the field of strategy, leadership, inspiration, organisation, or implementation.The three finalists all hail from the central west of the state, in West Wyalong, Blayney and Gulgong. Finalist Phillip Nankivell was nominated by the Blayney Agricultural and Pastoral Association.“Phillip has been president of the show society since 1983 and does an outstanding job leading, encouraging, and guiding the committee. After covid lockdowns and show cancellations in 2020, Phillip was determined that there would be a show this year.,” Mr Capp said. “Phillip has been central to improvements to the showground, the collaboration of different user groups and a fruitful relationship with the local council.”“He too has a vision around the inclusion of younger members, placing the show society in a good position for the future. Young stewards are shadowing senior stewards so they will gain the knowledge to continue staging successful shows in Blayney in years to come.”Gulgong Show Society, the first society to run a full show in 2021 as many others had cancelled due to covid restrictions, nominated Rose Jackson.“Rose never missed a Gulgong Show as a child and grew up to become president. Today she holds the positions of treasurer, sponsorship manager and secretary,’ Mr Capp said.“To wear so many hats and ensure everything is running smoothly, Rose dedicates many hours and calls on her extensive skill set. Since Rose has been involved with sponsorship the Show Society is in a good place financially, predominantly because she has a great rapport with the members of the community who in turn support the show. “During covid cancellations last year, Rose engaged show members with competitions run online through Facebook and was the driving force in the 2021Gulgong Show going ahead. Over 3000 people visited the show in the small town, the most people in the Show’s history.”Finalist Lyall Wilkinson was nominated by West Wyalong Show Society.“Lyall has been an active member of the Show Society for over 50 years. He has been the Steward for the Cattle section, organised the Hoof to Hook competition for many years, and has been a driving force behind the involvement of the local high school students during the Show,” Mr Capp said.“He has been responsible for bringing the next generation into the movement. He encourages students to take on junior stewards positions and has assisted with young judging workshops and mini field days.” “Lyall has been instrumental in the upgrade of showground facilities to encourage more community use and participation. He is heavily involved in the monthly community market day which helps the show society financially.” Previous winners include Brenton and Lynette Potter (Nimmitabel), Beverley O’Ryan (Nimmitabel), John Templeton (Lake Cargelligo), Greg Holland (Cobargo) .“Millions of people go to agricultural shows every year, and they’re almost entirely run by volunteers. This is a great opportunity to recognise some of those individuals” Mr Capp said.The winner will be announced on 19 June 2021 at the NSW State Conference themed “Adapt, Sustain, Grow” for agricultural shows, with shows joining digitally from ten regional locations Armidale, Bathurst, Bombaderry, Casino, Dubbo, Goulburn, Narrandera, North Ryde, Port Macquarie and Singleton.Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons of Resilience NSW will open the conference, and topics will include recruiting volunteers, engaging younger people, tips for running a covid safe show and success stories from shows across the state.