The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-10-20T21:00:00Z Injectable trace minerals: a solution to combat livestock heat stress this summer 2019-10-20T21:00:00Z injectable-trace-minerals-a-solution-to-combat-livestock-heat-stress-this-summer-1 With forecasts predicting another long hot summer ahead for southern regions, trace mineral supplementation is one effective solution to help combat heat stress in livestock over the coming months, says animal health company Virbac Australia. “High temperatures can affect everything from conception and fertility rates to immunity, meat quality and milk production, leading to significant economic impacts for producers,” reports Virbac Australia’s Technical Services Veterinarian Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas. “In extreme cases, it can even lead to livestock mortality.” Cattle begin feeling uncomfortable above 25°C – which means that heat stress will be an issue across all Australian livestock regions. For southern regions, cattle are particularly at risk of heat stress coming out of winter, and are more exposed to extreme heat events. What’s often surprising is that it’s not only extremely high daytime temperatures that trigger heat stress. Warmer night times can have more of an impact, says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. “Hot nights can be dangerous for livestock, as it’s harder to thermoregulate, dissipate heat accumulated during the day, and reduce their core temperature. That places them under continuous stress, increasing respiration, heart rate and water intake, and placing a strain on multiple physiological processes. In fact, recent research has revealed air temperatures rising as little as just 1.5°C above average can decrease conception rates by as much as 5%1. Even before birth, calves suffer the negative consequences of heat stress if cows were heat stressed during late pregnancy2.” “Heat stress affects the animal’s oxidative status, it increases the production of free radicals and reduces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to oxidative stress. In both beef cattle and sheep, oxidising agents present in the meat lead to lipid and protein peroxidation affecting muscle fibre structure, resulting in high drip loss, undesirable meat colour and shorter shelf life. In dairy cows, oxidative stress negatively impacts milk production and health. Cows under oxidative stress have increased incidence of mastitis, higher somatic cells count, poor responses to vaccination, decreased fertility, increased embryo mortality, abortion, premature calving, retained foetal membranes, and uterine infections. Furthermore, oxidative stress also affects sperm concentration and viability in males3,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. It’s clear that heat stress has real potential for devastating losses in terms of both performance and production – but the good news is that it can be effectively managed. Virbac Australia advises farmers and producers to act now and will be running free webinars on ways to minimise the impact of heat stress in livestock over summer. A pre-summer review of preparedness for heat stress is a great idea. This should include an examination of the livestock environment, including site characteristics, infrastructure and condition, to provide good shade and water sources, and even fans and sprinklers in intensive production environments. “Adequate water is essential,” Dr Gonzalez-Rivas explains. “It's worth remembering that animals under heat stress lose much more water through respiration and perspiration, often requiring up to five times more water than usual.” Having a good summer nutrition program that includes trace mineral supplementation is also key. Dr Gonzalez-Rivas recommends using a trace-mineral injection like Multimin injection to improve antioxidant activity “Antioxidants are an ideal heat stress abatement strategy, and Multimin adds important trace minerals like manganese, zinc, selenium and copper, to help boost antioxidants, reproductive performance and immune function4, 5. We also recommend increasing energy density to compensate for reduced feed intake,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas – “including slowly fermentable starch to reduce the amount of heat released in the rumen during fermentation6, as well as supplemental fat that bypasses the rumen and minimises the heat released during digestion.” High-quality forage and fibre also help optimise rumen efficiency and function, particularly for animals receiving high starch diets. If supplementary feeding, modify this strategy from once to twice-a-day feeding, and consider feeding less during the hotter hours and more at night, to allow heat dissipation7. It can also be beneficial to balance the mineral and electrolyte content, because excessive sweating or panting results in losses of sodium, potassium and bicarbonate, increasing the risks of acidosis and mineral imbalances. Victorian dairy farmer, Renee Murfett, is a big believer that it pays to be preventive rather than reactive when it comes to heat stress in cattle. “Summer can be harsh on our cows, so we make sure they’ve always got access to shade and water. We have a sprinkler system set up in our yard for hot days which not only cools the cows but also stops their frustration with flies. The first signs of heat stress we notice is heavy breathing and stock not wanting to move away from the shade. In more severe cases, they go down with exhaustion. We can lose anywhere from 500 to 1,000 litres of milk a day during a heat wave so Multimin is definitely something we are open to trialling in our cows during a heat stress event.” As Dr Gonzalez-Rivas concludes, “a proactive approach to the management of heat stress is more effective than a reactive response once it has occurred. Right now, is a great time to begin implementing the best processes to minimise the impact of what’s set to be another blisteringly hot Australian summer and I encourage all farmers and producers to register to our free webinars.” Get your livestock performance ready for summer. Sign up for the heat load index forecast, and heat stress alerts for beef cattle at chlt.com.au and for dairy cattle at dairy.katestone.com.au For more information and to register to the free webinars run by Virbac Australia, visit au.virbac.com/webinars Beef webinar: Thursday 31st October at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Dairy webinar: Thursday 5th December at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Ends MEDIA CONTACT Adam Arndell - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au [1] David Wolfenson, Zvi Roth, Impact of heat stress on cow reproduction and fertility, Animal Frontiers, Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages 32–38. 2 Fabris, T. F., Laporta, J., Skibiel, A. L., Corra, F. N., Senn, B. D., Wohlgemuth, S. E., & Dahl, G. E. (2019). Effect of heat stress during early, late, and entire dry period on dairy cattle. Journal of dairy science, 102(6), 5647-5656. 3 Celi P. (2011) Oxidative Stress in Ruminants. In: Mandelker L., Vajdovich P. (eds) Studies on Veterinary Medicine. Oxidative Stress in Applied Basic Research and Clinical Practice. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ 4 Machado, V. S., Oikonomou, G., Lima, S. F., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kacar, C., Foditsch, C., ... & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). The effect of injectable trace minerals (selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese) on peripheral blood leukocyte activity and serum superoxide dismutase activity of lactating Holstein cows. The Veterinary Journal, 200(2), 299-304. 5 Teixeira, A. G. V., Lima, F. S., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kussler, A., Lima, S. F., Felippe, M. J., & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). Effect of an injectable trace mineral supplement containing selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves. Journal of dairy science, 97(7), 4216-4226. 6 Gonzalez-Rivas, P. A., DiGiacomo, K., Russo, V. M., Leury, B. J., Cottrell, J. J., & Dunshea, F. R. (2016). Feeding slowly fermentable grains has the potential to ameliorate heat stress in grain-fed wethers. Journal of animal science, 94(7), 2981-2991. 7 Mader, T. L., Davis, M. S., & Brown-Brandl, T. (2006). Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle. Journal of Animal Science, 84(3), 712-719. Photo captions: Victorian Dairy Farmer Renee Murfett with Dr Susan Swaney Dairy cattle in Victoria Shocking secrets 2019-10-16T01:35:43Z shocking-secrets Dear Editor, The dark secrets of horse-racing have repeatedly outraged the public. Now, Melbourne Cup-winning trainer Darren Weir and two others have been charged with multiple counts of animal cruelty. Weir has been charged with nine offences including three counts of "engaging in the torturing, abusing, overworking and terrifying" of a racehorse. Police cameras earlier this year captured the men repeatedly shocking the horse with an electronic device called a "jigger". Weir has already been banned from racing for four years, but that was all racing officials did. Let's be clear – such offences are animal cruelty and must be prosecuted by law enforcement, not kept from sight in internal industry reviews. This is why the charges are so important. Weir trained the 2015 Melbourne Cup winner Prince of Penzance, who was recently featured in a movie glamorising racing. News reports say Weir was widely regarded as Australia's leading horse trainer before the police raid. We have to wonder what the rest of the industry is doing if this is what is being reported about the "leading" trainer. Victoria’s Minister for Racing stated "I understand people having a degree of cynicism about racing or, indeed, any kind of sport where there is money to be made from betting." To which we can only add – or any industry where animals are treated as objects, valued only for profit. As well as tormenting the winning horses, we know that about 13,000 "failed" horses are sent to slaughter each year. If you hate animal cruelty, please avoid the races. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay, NSW 2481 +61 411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Cow butchered alive 2019-10-10T11:46:57Z cow-butchered-alive-1 Dear Editor, People in Darwin and throughout the country are rightly dismayed at the light sentence handed out this week in the case of the man who cut the leg and backstrap (loin) from a living cow. The cow was stunned with the blunt end of an axe, but regained consciousness, in extreme agony. The offender was part of a group who came back later, after the cow had been killed, shouting "we want meat!" The man was given neither a fine nor a conviction, but was sentenced to 150 days community service. Under the N.T. Animal Welfare Act, offences can result in fines of $13,700 but penalties for cases of cruelty to animals are rarely imposed to the full extent of the law. In this case, pastoralists told police they had "never seen an animal in such distress", and had to shoot the cow. Numerous studies show that people who harm other animals often move on to harm their fellow humans. For example, one U.S. study found that animal abusers are five times more likely to commit violent crimes against humans. Another study in Australia revealed that 100 percent of sexual homicide offenders examined had a history of animal cruelty. It’s time that this country started to treat cases of cruelty to animals as the serious crimes that they are, because the whole of society is at risk when we don’t. If you suspect someone of abusing an animal, report it to authorities right away for the safety of animals and humans alike. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Strategist People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Australia) PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002. (08) 8556-5828 Dairy's decline 2019-10-06T22:08:04Z dairys-decline Dear Editor, Having grown up on a dairy farm, I understand the hardships faced by today’s farmers who are forced to move out of the industry as the price and demand for milk continues to fall. The struggling dairy farmer is not a new phenomenon. Dairy Australia figures show that the number of registered dairy farms fell from 22,000 in 1980 to 5,700 in 2018, meaning that 75% of dairy farms have closed down. The number of cows has only fallen by 17 percent in that time, indicating that the industry continues to be taken over by huge corporations. One farmer was quoted recently as saying "It's like losing my right arm" as his cows were driven off to slaughter. But let’s not forget: while it’s painful to lose an arm, those cows are losing their lives, after losing their calves shortly after birth every year, so that humans can steal the milk they produce to nurture their babies. The calves are either raised separately for the same cycle of pregnancy, birth and loss or, if male, shipped off to slaughter or shot or bludgeoned to death on the farm. Farmers are tough and resourceful. The ones I knew, who got out of dairy decades ago, diversified into more ethical products. Those losing their livelihoods now to the giant conglomerates will hopefully do the same, as the market for these vile products continues to shrink. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Injectable trace minerals: a solution to combat livestock heat stress this summer 2019-10-06T20:30:00Z injectable-trace-minerals-a-solution-to-combat-livestock-heat-stress-this-summer With forecasts predicting another long hot summer ahead for northern regions, trace mineral supplementation is one effective solution to help combat heat stress in livestock over the coming months, says animal health company Virbac Australia. “High temperatures can affect everything from conception and fertility rates to immunity, meat quality and production loss, leading to significant economic impacts for producers,” reports Virbac Australia’s Technical Services Veterinarian Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas. “In extreme cases, it can even lead to livestock mortality.” Cattle begin feeling uncomfortable above 25°C – which means that heat stress will be an issue across all Australian livestock regions. For northern regions, high heat load resulting from more extreme humidity is an even greater problem. What’s often surprising is that it’s not only extremely high daytime temperatures that trigger heat stress. Warmer night times can have more of an impact, says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. “Hot nights can be dangerous for livestock, as it’s harder to thermoregulate, dissipate heat accumulated during the day, and reduce their core temperature. That places them under continuous stress, increasing respiration, heart rate and water intake, and placing a strain on multiple physiological processes. In fact, recent research has revealed air temperatures rising as little as just 1.5°C above average can decrease conception rates by as much as 5%1. Even before birth, calves suffer the negative consequences of heat stress if cows were heat stressed during late pregnancy2.” “Heat stress affects the animal’s oxidative status, it increases the production of free radicals and reduces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to oxidative stress. In both beef cattle and sheep, oxidising agents present in the meat lead to lipid and protein peroxidation affecting muscle fibre structure, resulting in high drip loss, undesirable meat colour and shorter shelf life. For females, heat stress can also lead to much higher rates of embryo mortality, while also affecting sperm concentration and viability in males,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. Livestock Compliance & Project Co-ordinator at Bindaree Beef Group, Corina Muckenschnabl, is a big believer that it pays to be preventive rather than reactive when it comes to heat stress in cattle. “Our pre-summer checklist always includes a review of our heat stress management plan where we conduct a risk assessment based on cattle breed and shade infrastructure at our Myola Feedlot in Northern New South Wales. The Cattle Heat Load Toolbox (CHLT) calculates our heat load index threshold to determine if our stock are at low or high risk for heat stress and allows us to proactively manage the risk of heat stress at our site. Although the CHLT alarms us via a text message when we may need to implement our heat stress management plan, we need to be prepared well before we hit our heat load index threshold.” It’s clear that heat stress has real potential for devastating losses in terms of both performance and production – but the good news is that it can be effectively managed. Virbac Australia advises farmers and producers to act now and will be running free webinars on ways to minimise the impact of heat stress in livestock over summer. A pre-summer review of preparedness for heat stress is a great idea. This should include an examination of the livestock environment, including site characteristics, infrastructure and condition, to provide good shade and water sources, and even fans and sprinklers in intensive production environments. “Adequate water is essential,” Dr Gonzalez-Rivas explains. “It's worth remembering that animals under heat stress lose much more water through respiration and perspiration, often requiring up to five times more water than usual.” Having a good summer nutrition program that includes trace mineral supplementation is also key. Dr Gonzalez-Rivas recommends using a trace-mineral injection like Multimin injection to improve antioxidant activity. Antioxidants are an ideal heat stress abatement strategy, and Multimin adds important trace minerals like manganese, zinc, selenium and copper, to help boost antioxidants, reproductive performance and immune function 3,4. We also recommend increasing energy density to compensate for reduced feed intake,” says Dr Gonzalez Rivas – “including slowly fermentable starch to reduce the amount of heat released in the rumen during fermentation5, as well as supplemental fat that bypasses the rumen and minimises the heat released during digestion.” High-quality forage and fibre also help optimise rumen efficiency and function, particularly for animals receiving high starch diets. If supplementary feeding, modify this strategy from once to twice-a-day feeding, and consider feeding less during the hotter hours and more at night, to allow heat dissipation6. It can also be beneficial to balance the mineral and electrolyte content, because excessive sweating or panting results in losses of sodium, potassium and bicarbonate, increasing the risks of acidosis and mineral imbalances. As Dr Gonzalez-Rivas concludes, “a proactive approach to the management of heat stress is more effective than a reactive response once it has occurred. Right now, is a great time to begin implementing the best processes to minimise the impact of what’s set to be another blisteringly hot Australian summer and I encourage all farmers and producers to register to our free webinars.” Get your livestock performance ready for summer. Sign up for the heat load index forecast, and heat stress alerts for beef cattle at chlt.com.au and for dairy cattle at dairy.katestone.com.au For more information and to register to the free webinars run by Virbac Australia, visit au.virbac.com/webinars Beef webinar: Thursday 31st October at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Dairy webinar: Thursday 5th December at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Ends MEDIA CONTACT Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas during a cattle trial Beef cattle in Northern Australia [1] David Wolfenson, Zvi Roth, Impact of heat stress on cow reproduction and fertility, Animal Frontiers, Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages 32–38, https://doi.org/10.1093/af/vfy027 2 Fabris, T. F., Laporta, J., Skibiel, A. L., Corra, F. N., Senn, B. D., Wohlgemuth, S. E., & Dahl, G. E. (2019). Effect of heat stress during early, late, and entire dry period on dairy cattle. Journal of dairy science, 102(6), 5647-5656. 3 Machado, V. S., Oikonomou, G., Lima, S. F., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kacar, C., Foditsch, C., ... & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). The effect of injectable trace minerals (selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese) on peripheral blood leukocyte activity and serum superoxide dismutase activity of lactating Holstein cows. The Veterinary Journal, 200(2), 299-304. 4 Teixeira, A. G. V., Lima, F. S., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kussler, A., Lima, S. F., Felippe, M. J., & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). Effect of an injectable trace mineral supplement containing selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves. Journal of dairy science, 97(7), 4216-4226. 5 Gonzalez-Rivas, P. A., DiGiacomo, K., Russo, V. M., Leury, B. J., Cottrell, J. J., & Dunshea, F. R. (2016). Feeding slowly fermentable grains has the potential to ameliorate heat stress in grain-fed wethers. Journal of animal science, 94(7), 2981-2991. 6 Mader, T. L., Davis, M. S., & Brown-Brandl, T. (2006). Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle. Journal of Animal Science, 84(3), 712-719. How Many Cats Is Too Many? How Much are Pet Owners Spending on Pets' Christmas Presents? 2019-09-26T05:18:42Z how-many-cats-is-too-many-how-much-are-pet-owners-spending-on-pets-christmas-presents A new survey  sets out to find the answers Australian pet owners really want to know. Critical questions such as "How many cats is too many?", "How much do Australians spend on their pets' Christmas presents?" and many more will be answered once the results are in from the Ultimate State of Pet Care Survey currently being undertaken by leading Australian online retailer VetShopAustralia. In order to get the best results possible, VetShopAustralia is asking Australian pet owners to take just 6 minutes to complete the survey and in return, participants can opt in for a chance to win thousands of dollars in pet related prizes and get priority access to the results. Alternatively participants can choose to respond to the survey with complete anonymity.  To participate, Australian pet owners are asked to visit https://lnkd.in/gEXpgPG. Dynamically designed to tailor the questions to the responses given, it's easy, fast and fun to have your say. VetShopAustralia.com.au is Australia's oldest, largest and most awarded online retailer of pet products. Founded by veterinarian Dr Mark Perissinotto BVSc and his brother in 1999 (the same year as eBay!) VetShopAustralia delivers discount brand name pet medications, premium pet foods and more to over 10,000 pet owners every month. For more information visit https://www.vetshopaustralia.com.au/  Taylor says nup to the cup 2019-09-21T12:23:16Z taylor-says-nup-to-the-cup-1 Dear Editor, So Taylor Swift has pulled out of her appearance at the Melbourne Cup in November. I hope her fans can get refunds. For anyone else thinking of going, there really is no point now, unless you like watching horses whipped and made to run so fast that they are regularly left with bleeding in the lungs or broken bones. Most horses are raced as two and three-year-olds, although some will race as young as one year and nine months, despite the fact that the horses are still physically immature and prone to injury. Many horses disappear altogether from racing early in their career as injuries render them worthless. Though illegal in Australia, some will have their injuries masked by drugs that enable the horse to keep racing, until the injuries inevitably worsen and the horse breaks down and is sent to slaughter. Like Taylor Swift, please skip the Melbourne Cup. Help phase out this exploitative “sport” by refusing to patronise existing tracks, lobbying against the construction of new tracks and educating your friends and family about the tragic lives that racehorses lead. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Parasite management roadshow tours Ballarat offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-18T23:18:36Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-ballarat-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Ballarat in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Ballarat event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Jim Gaylard from Trawalla, described his local event as “a good reminder on the advantages of early weaning and the importance of worm control in young stock. It emphasized the importance of maintaining pastures and worm burdens in younger animals. We’ve been using Cydectin Long Acting injection in our sheep for quite some years and we will now use it in our weaning program to keep our cattle worm free for 120 days and our pastures cleaner.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Ballarat on-farm demonstration Ballarat event attendees Parasite management roadshow tours Mortlake offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T21:43:04Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-mortlake-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Mortlake in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Mortlake event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Mick Fitzgibbon from “Clogheen” described his local event as “a great opportunity for young and old to learn about best practice weaner management and animal health. As an older person in the industry, it’s always good to see these types of events so that the next generation of cattle producers can get an idea on best practice today. We’ve used Cydectin Long Acting injection for over 3 years to reduce our worm burden in our weaned calves and heifers that have just calved and we are very happy with the results we’re seeing.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Mortlake on-farm demonstration Parasite management roadshow tours Mt Gambier offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T03:56:17Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-mt-gambier-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshows last stop was in Mt Gambier in South Australia on Friday 13th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Mt Gambier event presentation covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Cameron Milich from “Coola Station”, Kongorong described his local event as “a very informative presentation especially when you’re there with other producers to bounce ideas off each other. We will endeavor to introduce these learnings into our weaning program and start using Cydectin Long Acting injection to give our weaners longer protection against worms.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Mt Gambier event attendees: Cameron Milich, Stephen Fisher from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac and Darcie Kuhl from Elders Parasite management roadshow tours Victoria & South Australia offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-15T23:31:20Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-victoria-south-australia-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Bairnsdale, Yea, Euroa, Kyneton, Ballarat, Mortlake, Hamilton, Coleraine and Mt Gambier last week. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The events on-farm demonstrations and presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Raelene Mold from “Barina”, Yea described her local event as “a good reminder of the importance of using the right products at the right time to get my weaners to their target weights quicker, and the importance of mineral supplementation with vaccinations. Keeping up with new product developments and having access to experts at these types of events is key to me getting the right information, ensuring I have the correct protocols in place to continue to produce a quality product to the market. Sometimes just having the reassurance that I am doing the right thing is all that is needed, you can never stop learning in this industry and that's why these events are so crucial to my learning.” Beef producer Craig Grant from Lindsay Murray Greys, Coleraine described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn about controlling worms at critical times. A lot of the time we can get stuck in seminars covering the theoretical side of things, so it was good to have a hands-on component of this event. We have been looking for a long acting product that is potent and persistent to control our worm burdens at critical times of the year and we are interested in the results Cydectin Long Acting injection will give us. We hope to reduce our worm burdens and take the stress out of animals during the colder months which is when they are challenged the most.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Yea event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Raelene Mold from Yea, Rob Inglis from Elders and John Purvis from Elders. Coleraine on-farm demonstration Coleraine event presentation Parasite management roadshow tours Coleraine & Hamilton offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-15T22:52:24Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-coleraine-hamilton-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Coleraine & Hamilton in Victoria on Thursday 12th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Coleraine & Hamilton events included an on-farm demonstration and presentations on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Craig Grant from Lindsay Murray Greys, Coleraine described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn about controlling worms at critical times. A lot of the time we can get stuck in seminars covering the theoretical side of things, so it was good to have a hands-on component of this event. We have been looking for a long acting product that is potent and persistent to control our worm burdens at critical times of the year and we are interested in the results Cydectin Long Acting injection will give us. We hope to reduce our worm burdens and take the stress out of animals during the colder months which is when they are challenged the most.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Coleraine on-farm demonstration Coleraine event presentation Hamilton event attendees - Rob Inglis, Andrew Mibus, Rod Evans and Dr Matthew Ball Parasite management roadshow tours Kyneton offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-12T02:52:56Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-kyneton-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Kyneton in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Kyneton event presentation covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Dave Bassett from Lindley Property, Kyneton described his local event as “a great opportunity to hear from the experts about best practice weaner management. I have only ever used Cydectin Long Acting Injection for my sheep, so it was interesting to hear how to use it for my cattle to increase live weight gain.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Kyneton event: Dave Bassett from Lindley Property, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Rob Inglis from Elders, Adam Mitchell from Virbac and Michael Ellis from Elders. Parasite management roadshow tours Yea & Euroa offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-10T21:27:55Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-yea-euroa-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Yea and Euroa in Victoria on Tuesday 10th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Yea and Euroa event presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Raelene Mold from “Barina”, Yea described her local event as “a good reminder of the importance of using the right products at the right time to get my weaners to their target weights quicker, and the importance of mineral supplementation with vaccinations. Keeping up with new product developments and having access to experts at these types of events is key to me getting the right information, ensuring I have the correct protocols in place to continue to produce a quality product to the market. Sometimes just having the reassurance that I am doing the right thing is all that is needed, you can never stop learning in this industry and that's why these events are so crucial to my learning.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Yea event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Raelene Mold from Yea, Rob Inglis from Elders and John Purvis from Elders. Parasite management roadshow tours Omeo & Bairnsdale offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-09T21:54:00Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-omeo-bairnsdale-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow kicked off at Omeo and Bairnsdale in Victoria on Monday 9th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Omeo and Bairnsdale event presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Jill Hill from Hinnomunjie, Victoria described the Omeo event as “a great opportunity to have so much knowledge and expertise in the one room all together. I have taken away new practical knowledge to improve our farm’s weaning processes in particular how to use strategic products such as Cydectin Long Acting to improve heifer weight and health for optimal joining outcomes.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Omeo event: Rhys Kennedy from Bairnsdale Elders, Rob Inglis from Elders, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Matthew Grylls from Virbac and Jill Hill from Hinnomunjie. Bairnsdale event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Rob Inglis from Elder, Rosamarie Stewart from Glenshields Pastoral Company, Debbie Hammond from Mitchell Valley, Rhys Kennedy from Elders, Chris Stewart from Glenshields Pastoral Company, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac and Brendon Tice and Emi and from Elders.