The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-03-24T21:52:22Z Industry expert-led Liver Fluke roadshow concludes following NSW tour 2019-03-24T21:52:22Z industry-expert-led-liver-fluke-roadshow-concludes-following-nsw-tour Two industry experts have recently wrapped up a roadshow across NSW designed to highlight the importance of controlling two-week old fluke in sheep, beef and dairy production and the emerging problem of chemical resistance. Ms Jane Kelley, PhD Candidate, Department of Animal, Plant and Soil Sciences and Dr Matthew Ball, Technical Services Veterinarian at Virbac Animal Health toured regional NSW towns earlier this month to share their expertise and help cattle producers address liver fluke disease among their cattle. The roadshow covered everything from the latest global and local findings to new testing methods, how to build a FlukeKill program and how to integrate a fluke treatment with best-practice worm treatment – making it an invaluable forum for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of control methods for optimal cattle production. Beef and sheep producer Tony Overton was one of the farmers who attended the Walcha seminar. “We’ve always been very vigilant when it comes to these issues in sheep, but we’ve never looked at it being a major issue for cattle, even though we knew it was coming,” he said. “This seminar highlighted the three different application methods, with good explanations of the pros and cons of each, which was of great value to me. I found it very helpful to learn the science behind the best methods for controlling parasites and fluke in our cattle.” Beef producer Bill Mitchell said he attended the Armidale seminar because “we know we have issues with fluke and realise we should be doing more about it. It was great to hear from the experts and get reacquainted with the whole fluke issue – and it was also useful to make contact with the best people to help us. We already use Virbac products, and while our resellers often guide us with how and when to use the products, it’s good to hear a wider range of information on the topic. We will be seeking Virbac’s help as we implement a fixed program to help us run the farm more efficiently.” Virbac Australia’s Fluke Product Manager David Yang described the roadshow as a great success. “With autumn heralding the start of liver fluke season, now’s a critical time for graziers to address the disease among their cattle. Jane and Matthew have presented some really invaluable information to Australia’s industry professionals and cattle producers, and this has been a unique opportunity to learn the latest in fluke management from the experts. We hope it’s helped to inform Australian farmers on the best practices to safeguard their livestock and minimise the impact of this challenging disease.” Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Virbac Australia Fluke Roadshow Seminar Virbac Australia Representatives (Emma Dodd, David Yang, Matthew Ball, Jane Kelley) Trace mineral trial continues to deliver compelling data to support its efficacy 2019-02-27T06:16:22Z trace-mineral-trial-continues-to-deliver-compelling-data-to-support-its-efficacy Seven livestock producers are currently competing in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, designed to test the livestock benefits of Multimin, an injection used to top up trace minerals in sheep and cattle prior to high demand periods. Led by animal health company Virbac Australia, the 12-month program will highlight the effects of the mineral injection, delivering real results by real producers. The challengers are competing to be crowned the Multimin Challenger King or Queen – and it will be the public who will ultimately decide the winner when voting opens online in April. The winner will be announced in May 2019 and awarded an ‘experience of lifetime’ prize, specifically tailored to their farming system. The latest challenger to reveal their results is Victorian challenger Renee Murfett, who together with husband Alister operates two dairy farms in Framlingham, Victoria. Their 145-hectare “Springlea” property has 220 Friesian Red Dairy milking cows, while their second 183-hectare farm “Merton Park” has 250 Friesian Red Dairy cows. Renee’s goal has been to increase the immunity, health and productivity of her calves. With five heifers previously lost due to broken legs, Renee’s stock were believed to have suboptimal levels of trace minerals – making Multimin’s animal health program a great opportunity to see the impact of the trace mineral supplement on livestock health and performance. As part of the trial, 210 animals (105 treated and 105 untreated ‘control’ animals) were used to assess improvements in immunity, indicated by a reduction in disease and with the potential for improved growth. The treated group were given Multimin 4 in 1 trace mineral injection for cattle at 1mL/ 50kg at birth, and again at weaning (around 12 weeks of age), and data was collected relating to incidence of scours or disease, presence of illness or death, growth rate and general health. Renee observed some marked differences between the two groups at key stages of development. “The first signs appeared very early on,” she reports. “At just four days of age, we found that only the non-treated calves developed scours. Then by day seven, we began to see visual improvements in the Multimin-treated calves, which had darker, shinier coats compared to the non-treated animals.” Renee’s mentor Dr Susan Swaney explains the significance of that finding. “The coat is an indicator of how well the skin and other physical barriers are. These being the first line of defence, animals with healthy skin and mucous membranes are less likely to be invaded by disease,” she explains. “Improved immune function means improved future productivity, and this type of program while calves are undergoing a growth phase and developing muscle, cartilage and bone will ensure they’re given the best possible start to life.” Renee also observed that when calves were transitioned onto hard feed, stock from both groups developed scouring – but while some of the control animals went off their feed for two to three days, the Multimin-treated animals continued to feed well. As Susan explains, “we know the importance of the trace minerals in Multimin in the development of all stages of the immune system. Optimisation of trace elements at critical time points can provide better disease protection and in some cases improved weight gains, to give young animals the best beginning at what is a critical time in development.” To find out more about how Multimin can improve your livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Farmers can also follow the trials at www.multiminchallenge.com - Ends - Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 / 02 6766 4513 Photo caption: Renee Murfett with mentor Dr Susan Swaney Renee’s Multimin treated calves Industry expert-led Liver Fluke Roadshow set to tour NSW 2019-02-25T05:50:21Z industry-expert-led-liver-fluke-roadshow-set-to-tour-nsw Autumn means liver fluke season, so right now is a critical time for graziers to address liver fluke disease among their cattle. Around six million cattle graze Australian pastures where liver fluke is endemic*, and although it’s been a dry summer, experts warn cattle producers not to become complacent in the lead up to Autumn and consider the best strategies to protect their livestock. Next week, two industry experts will kick-off a roadshow across NSW to highlight the importance of controlling two-week old fluke in beef and dairy production. Ms Jane Kelley, PhD Candidate, Department of Animal, Plant and Soil Sciences and Dr Matthew Ball, Veterinarian, Technical Services Veterinarian at Virbac Animal Health will tour regional NSW towns from March 4 - 13 to share their expertise. It’s being described as a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of control methods for optimal cattle production. Jane completed an Associate Degree in Environmental Horticulture at the University of Melbourne, a Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Science with Honours, at La Trobe University and is currently completing a PhD. Based at Melbourne’s Centre for AgriBioscience, her research focuses on the epidemiology and management of liver fluke parasites in cattle. Jane has been quantifying the prevalence of liver fluke and drug resistance on dairy farms in Victoria, and is now optimising liver fluke control strategies. “My aim is to increase the productivity and profitability of cattle industries by reducing the detrimental impacts liver fluke has on production, weight gain and fertility in Australian cattle,” she says. Matthew has 18 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles, with jobs in clinical practice, government and industry. He has undertaken post-graduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs. “We’ll be presenting nine seminars on the roadshow, which will cover the latest global and local findings, new testing methods, how to build a FlukeKill program and how to integrate a fluke treatment with best-practice worm treatment,” says Matthew. “We’re really looking forward to sharing our knowledge, and helping both producers and vets to take the necessary steps to safeguard livestock.” “We’re excited to be hosting Ms Kelley and Dr Ball,” says Virbac Australia’s Fluke Product Manager David Yang. “They’ll present some really invaluable information to Australia’s industry professionals and cattle producers, and this is a unique opportunity to learn the latest in fluke management from the experts.” Please note: this is an invitation-only event. Please contact your local Virbac Australia representative or your local Virbac merchandise store for more information on how to attend. Seminar itinerary: Date Location Time Monday, 4th March Glen Innes Services Club 6pm Dinner provided. Tuesday, 5th March Armidale Golf Club, Armidale 7am. Breakfast and refreshments provided. Wednesday, 6th March Walcha Veterinary Supplies, Walcha 7.30am. Breakfast and refreshments provided. Thursday, 7th March Hill & Crofts CRT, Blayney 8.30am. Breakfast provided. Thursday, 7th March Orange Duntryleague, Orange 6:30pm. Food and refreshments provided. Friday, 8th March Elders, Cowra 8am. Refreshments provided. Monday, 11th March Adelong Services & Citizens Club, Adelong 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Tuesday, 12th March The Services Club, Braidwood 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Wednesday, 13th March Bombala Golf Club, Bombala 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Ends * NSW Government Department of Primary Industries; March 2017, Primefact 446, fourth edition. Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Ms Jane Kelley Dr Matthew Ball That Steve Irwin Google doodle 2019-02-25T03:04:08Z that-steve-irwin-google-doodle Dear Editor, Steve Irwin was no saint, nor would he have claimed to be. He was a showbiz personality, acting the part of a "wildlife warrior" brilliantly, while in reality exploiting and harassing the animals he claimed to protect. Hauling animals to television studios or ambushing a crocodile with ropes, duct tape, and a camera crew — traumatising the animal and temping other people to approach wild animals themselves or, even worse, purchase one to keep as a "pet" — is neither education nor conservation. True wildlife experts, such as Jean-Michel Cousteau, frown upon the idea of hauling exotic animals around in an endless parade of shows and exhibits and disturbing animals in their natural habitats. Cousteau stated that Irwin would "interfere with nature, jump on animals, grab them, hold them … it goes very well on television. It sells, it appeals to a lot people, but I think it’s very misleading. You don’t touch nature, you just look at it." Zoos and wildlife shows are just that – show business. Leave that for Hollywood, and please don’t support any business where live animals are taken from their natural environment, showcased and exploited. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Consultant, PETA Australia PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002 (08) 8556-5828 mimib@peta.org.au Mug punters 2019-02-22T05:15:19Z mug-punters Dear Editor, How much do punters know about the industry that takes their money? The racing industry seems to think Australians are mug punters – gullible and easily swindled. In addition to the charges laid recently against horse racing trainer Ben Currie for using an electrical shocking device, there was another charge that didn't get much news coverage: "Making dishonest statements in not disclosing to potential buyers that Rock Spark bled at Gatton on 6 April 2017." The law takes a dim view of misleading statements during sales transactions, but what about the gamblers? If you are a punter, you can bet (and this bet you'll win) that there are things about the horse you are betting on that you didn't know, and that might have changed your decision. One of many such concealed details is the fact that the horse may have bled after his or her last race. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Haemorrhage is a very common condition among racehorses. It causes bleeding into the lungs and airways, usually as a result of burst capillaries. Researchers at the University of Melbourne have shown that 56 percent of racehorses have blood in their windpipes, and 90 percent have blood deeper in their lungs. But only 1 percent show outward signs of bleeding, so it is easy to conceal. Punters should legally be able to access essential veterinary information about injuries, bleeding or other issues, otherwise it is probably fair to say you are being denied all the facts necessary to make a reasonable bet. But here's a much better bet - don't put your hard-earned cash into cruelty: stay away from tracks and betting venues. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Consultant, PETA Australia PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002 (08) 8556-5828 mimib@peta.org.au Virbac Australia announces the winner of their latest Cydectin LA testimonial competition 2019-02-22T00:39:40Z virbac-australia-announces-the-winner-of-their-latest-cydectin-la-testimonial-competition-1 With internal parasite infestation being the single most important disease faced by Australia’s red meat producers, animal health company Virbac Australia recently decided to run a testimonial competition across social media to discover the impact of their parasite product Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle on farms around Australia. The product is known for its unbeatable potency and persistency, and it provides the longest protection available against a range of internal and external parasites, including worms – but rather than just take Virbac’s word for it, the manufacturer asked Cydectin LA users to tell their own stories on their Facebook page. Customers were asked to share how the product improved productivity and profitability, saved labour and helped heifers and weaners to reach optimal weight earlier. One entrant would be the lucky winner of a Leicht's Stockman Pro-Chute worth $7,000, while the store with the winning entrant would also receive a donation of $1,000 to go to a nominated local charity. In addition, everyone who entered won a free pack of Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle. Virbac Australia recently announced the overall winner as cattle grazier David Ross from Wollomombi, east of Armidale, NSW, and he was recently the delighted recipient of a brand new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute. David summarised his experience using Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle as follows: “We began using Cydectin LA in our weaners 4 years ago. We wean around 500 head in March every year and we immediately noticed the difference LA was making. We were no longer seeing any wormy cattle in mid-winter and the visual difference in our weaners with no tail present was a very obvious benefit. Since using LA we have been getting our replacement heifers to joining weights quicker, this product has been great for our business.” GrazAg Armidale was announced as the winning store, with Virbac Australia donating $1,000 to their chosen charity, BackTrack. The charity enables young people who have lost their way to reconnect with education and training, become work-ready and secure meaningful employment. The youth they work with are mostly rural males aged 12 to 19 who have multiple and complex challenges in education, health, justice, housing and employment. BackTrack helps these young people to get back on track by developing strong, happy and healthy foundations that result in positive life pathways and full participation in their communities, and Virbac Australia is proud to be able to contribute to this worthwhile cause. When it comes to a parasite management program, Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball says that Autumn is always a strategic time to control cattle parasites such as worms and ticks. “Numbers of parasites are often at a high level and a highly effective Autumn drench will not only remove the current parasites but reduce overall paddock contamination. An Autumn treatment with Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle will strategically reduce the risk from highly contaminated pastures and avoid the need for repeat drench treatments. Autumn use of Cydectin LA can often be timed to a pre-weaning or weaning time drench.” Matt continues, “Independent research has proven that single strategic use of Cydectin LA in growing stock will lead to much higher productivity than multiple short acting drenches. The vaccine is changing the approach to the control of worms and cattle ticks in Australia. Used strategically, the product can deliver improved productivity, animal welfare, labor efficiency and resistance management.” To find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA, farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Cydectin LA testimonial winner, David Ross with his new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball Virbac Australia announces the winner of their latest Cydectin LA testimonial competition 2019-02-21T23:44:21Z virbac-australia-announces-the-winner-of-their-latest-cydectin-la-testimonial-competition With internal parasite infestation being the single most important disease faced by Australia’s red meat producers, animal health company Virbac Australia recently decided to run a testimonial competition across social media to discover the impact of their parasite product Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle on farms around Australia. The product is known for its unbeatable potency and persistency, and it provides the longest protection available against a range of internal and external parasites, including worms – but rather than just take Virbac’s word for it, the manufacturer asked Cydectin LA users to tell their own stories on their Facebook page. Customers were asked to share how the product improved productivity and profitability, saved labour and helped heifers and weaners to reach optimal weight earlier. One entrant would be the lucky winner of a Leicht's Stockman Pro-Chute worth $7,000, while the store with the winning entrant would also receive a donation of $1,000 to go to a nominated local charity. In addition, everyone who entered won a free pack of Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle. Virbac Australia recently announced the overall winner as cattle grazier David Ross from Wollomombi, east of Armidale, NSW, and he was recently the delighted recipient of a brand new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute. David summarised his experience using Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle as follows: “We began using Cydectin LA in our weaners 4 years ago. We wean around 500 head in March every year and we immediately noticed the difference LA was making. We were no longer seeing any wormy cattle in mid-winter and the visual difference in our weaners with no tail present was a very obvious benefit. Since using LA we have been getting our replacement heifers to joining weights quicker, this product has been great for our business.” GrazAg Armidale was announced as the winning store, with Virbac Australia donating $1,000 to their chosen charity, BackTrack. The charity enables young people who have lost their way to reconnect with education and training, become work-ready and secure meaningful employment. The youth they work with are mostly rural males aged 12 to 19 who have multiple and complex challenges in education, health, justice, housing and employment. BackTrack helps these young people to get back on track by developing strong, happy and healthy foundations that result in positive life pathways and full participation in their communities, and Virbac Australia is proud to be able to contribute to this worthwhile cause. When it comes to a parasite management program, Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball says that Autumn is always a strategic time to control cattle parasites such as worms and ticks. “Numbers of parasites are often at a high level and a highly effective Autumn drench will not only remove the current parasites but reduce overall paddock contamination. An Autumn treatment with Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle will strategically reduce the risk from highly contaminated pastures and avoid the need for repeat drench treatments. Autumn use of Cydectin LA can often be timed to a pre-weaning or weaning time drench.” Matt continues, “Independent research has proven that single strategic use of Cydectin LA in growing stock will lead to much higher productivity than multiple short acting drenches. The vaccine is changing the approach to the control of worms and cattle ticks in Australia. Used strategically, the product can deliver improved productivity, animal welfare, labor efficiency and resistance management.” To find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA, farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Cydectin LA testimonial winner, David Ross with his new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball 2019 Campdrafting competition and performance horse sale declared a record-breaking success 2019-02-15T00:30:00Z 2019-campdrafting-competition-and-performance-horse-sale-declared-a-record-breaking-success Tamworth’s 2019 Landmark Classic Campdraft & Sale, Australia’s nine-day Campdrafting competition and performance horse sale is all wrapped up – and Landmark Equine’s Hannah Murray reports that it’s been a phenomenally successful year. “Sales exceeded $7 million for the third year running, and we also sold 83% of horses, hitting an average of $14,672.52, which is only just shy of last year’s average. John & Jenn Corbett’s Lot 262 “Yaven Smooth Spin” was the star of the show, setting a new Australian Performance Horse record when she sold for $230,000 to Steve & Toni Hart. It’s a fantastic result and one we are hugely proud of,” she says. “There’s an ever-growing passion for Australian-bred performance horses – and the popularity of this year’s event is a true testament to the dedication of the vendors, who are consistently striving to improve the genetics and training of their horses,” continues Hannah. Attended by competitors, vendors, purchasers and spectators from every corner of Australia and beyond, the livestream smashed view records from more than 16 countries, including notable responses from the US, Canada, India, Hong Kong, New Zealand, UK, and the Netherlands. Some of the events highlights this year included the Prydes EasiFeed Australian Performance Horse Challenge final on Monday night, which has become a real highlight of Classic week and a showcase of some of the best hands in the industry. “Monday night was full of suspense, thrills, spills and some exciting runs,” says Hannah. “Local trainer Wyatt Young rode “Sheady Spin N Pepsi” owned by Wayne & Lisa McDonell through a beautiful final round to claim victory with a score of 323.21 and was crowned the 2019 Prydes EasiFeed Australian Performance Horse Champion.” Tuesday night’s final rounds kicked off with the AELEC Arena Bar Dash For Cash, an exciting hit out between the top 10 geldings. A cash pool of $5,000 was awarded to winners Jason Wanstall & “Ervines Dundee” owned by the Great Southern Syndicate, who nabbed the title with a well-earned 89-point run. The Mavericks Western Wear Masters Final was next, with 15 competitors on open-aged horses vying for the Champion title. Troy Palmer added another Masters win to the book, riding Terry Snow’s mare “Hell’s A Comin” for a 90 in the final and a 178 overall. Billy-Jo Rae and “Cooinda Knight’s Eve” triumphed in the 2019 Martins Stock Haulage Open Campdraft, with a smoking run for 91 in the Tuesday night final, which took their aggregate to 268, enough to steer ahead and take the 2019 title. On Wednesday night, the Prydes EasiFeed NCCA Champion Rider event was taken out by Pete Comiskey & Paris (team ACA) who over three rounds scored a 90, 88 and an 89 to win the aggregate by 5 points. The riders from GCA won the teams section, with $2,000 donated to their chosen charity Cancer Council of Australia. Next up was another highlight, the Charlie Maher Memorial Young Guns, featuring the Campdraft stars of tomorrow. Josh Barnett romped to victory on the family stallion "Barnlodge Omega Destiny" smashing out an 89 in the final. The 2019 Landmark Classic Campdraft was another hotly contested final, which had spectators on the edge of their seats. Wyatt Young aboard “Nashville Nightman” owned by Marg Hinde, Royce Howard & Jason Bower, laid out a textbook run for a tidy 88 and the 2019 Classic Champion title. “It was an amazing accomplishment for Wyatt, a young local trainer who won our two biggest incentive events of the year,” says Hannah. Finally, the Dalgety Stallion Shootout final on Friday night was a big hit, with a huge crowd – and it was a nail-bitingly close event. Natasha Carlon and family owned “Heatwave”, put together a fantastic cut-out to snatch the win with an aggregate of 200.5. “We’d like to say a big thank you to 4CYTE Equine and Kintala Performance Horses (David & Jessica Bell) for their sponsorship of the fantastic 4CYTE Gelding Incentive,” says Hannah. The event offered a cash pool of $10,000 to the top 5 placed geldings, and was won by Jon Templeton on Jeremy Storrier’s “Salt And Cat”. Hannah is also full of praise for everyone involved in this year’s event. “We cannot thank our staff, sponsors, cattle donors and vendors enough for their hard work. To all the traders, spectators, Australian Equine and Livestock Events Centre (AELEC) staff, contractors, buyers, vendors and volunteers, thank you. We could not run an even like this without your support. And congratulations must also go to the Classic Ladies Foundation and their supporters, who raised over $70,000 for Kiss Goodbye to MC and the Foundation for Breast Cancer Care – a tremendous effort once again.” “There are some exciting times to come for the Australian Performance Horse industry,” Hannah concludes. “We are extremely proud to be part of it, and we look forward to moving even further onwards and upwards in the future.” Photos & Video Files: available for download here. Credit to be provided to @ Wild Fillies Photography. ENDS Media Enquiries: C7EVEN Communications Adam Arndell (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au A shocking business 2019-02-11T00:42:15Z a-shocking-business Dear Editor, Once again, the news is full of stories about the horseracing industry. This is not surprising, considering the immense abuse that goes on there. This time, charges have been laid after police raids, which found four Taser-like "jiggers" at a trainer’s property. A jigger, the sports journalists tell us, is an electronic device that is used to stimulate a horse to run faster. It is used in training, and the action is simulated on race day so the horse believes he or she is about to be shocked. We are also shocked, but not surprised. Imagine being pushed beyond the point of exhaustion: the bones in your legs straining to hold up the weight of your body, your bleeding lungs incapable of taking in enough air, and you're forced to keep running despite it all. This is what life is like for racehorses, who are too often chronically drugged by trainers in order to mask their pain and enhance their performance. In fact, the entire horseracing business causes enormous suffering and death every year to thousands of horses. They suffer broken bones, gastric ulcers and bleeding into their lungs from over-exertion. Doping with anti-inflammatory and other drugs can affect their respiration and muscles, and pain killers will allow trainers to push the horse well beyond safe levels. Horses that don’t win immediately are often classified as ‘wastage’ and are sent, with the ageing winners, to the knackeries for pet food or on long journeys to abattoirs for human consumption. Government figures show that as many as 40,000 horses are slaughtered each year in Australia. Horseracing is an industry, not a sport, and the persistent corruption scandals just emphasise that it is a cruel and inhumane business. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Cattle fertility, conception and weight gains revealed by latest Multimin Performance Ready Challenger 2019-02-05T02:12:30Z cattle-fertility-conception-and-weight-gains-revealed-by-latest-multimin-performance-ready-challenger South Australian farm manager Craig Brewin has announced the latest round of results from the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program run by animal health company Virbac Australia. The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge has given seven Australian farmers the chance to experience first-hand the benefits of Multimin trace mineral injection. Challengers receive 12 months of free Multimin product and a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors. With each challenger sharing their program results and experiences, Craig has been paying particular attention to how Multimin contributes to increased fertility, conception and weight gain, supported by expert advice from mentor Dr Colin Trengove, Vet, University of Adelaide lecturer, and Managing Director of Pro Ag Consulting. Operating from Maranoa Downs, 20km west of Naracoorte SA, Craig runs predominately Angus cows, which are joined to Wagyu bulls to produce feedlot-entry cattle. After running multiple trace element tests on cattle of various age groups over the years, Craig discovered ongoing issues with cobalt, selenium, copper and manganese deficiencies in many of his animals. Under the guidance of Multimin mentor Dr Colin Trengove, Craig decided to trial the effects of Multimin on the general health and weight gain of his calves. Craig explains how the trial was conducted. “We treated 50% of our calves with Multimin at marking and weaning and plan to treat the same calves again 3 months post weaning. The other 50% were left untreated and used as a control mob. When comparing the weights of the treated and untreated steers in August 2018 and again in January 2019, and we found a modest weight gain advantage in the treated steers. Although weight gain increases are not always attributed to trace minerals, it is possible that Multimin helped improved the immune function of the steers, and hence provided them with a better opportunity to grow. Unquestionably, the general appearance of the treated calves has also improved, and it’s clear from this result that Multimin’s impact on immunity gave our steers an additional means to grow and gain weight.” For Dr Trengove, the benefits of the Multimin program are clear. “Adequate nutrition including trace minerals are integral to the development of muscle, cartilage and bone during the growth phase in calves,” he says. “There are numerous studies that confirm the critical role that trace minerals play in immunity for growing calves. Collectively, they show that the immune system can be enhanced through the use of trace mineral supplements such as Multimin, leading to better disease protection and additional weight gain.” Outside of the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge Craig ran a second test focusing on the effects of Multimin on fertility. “In this trial, heifers with their first calf at foot were treated with Multimin and Webster’s 5 in 1 B12 in early May (pre-calving) and then treated with Multimin again in August at calf marking (pre-joining). Our bulls were also treated with Multimin before joining. The heifers were joined over an eight-week period, and it was recorded that out of the 127 head joined, 122 fell pregnant. This meant a 96% conception rate, which is phenomenal,” Craig says. “Using Multimin in conjunction with Websters 5 in 1 B12 has proved highly effective. Generally, it’s quite challenging to get our heifers rearing their first calf back into calf, so I’m very happy with these results.” To find out more about how Multimin can improve livestock performance, contact your local stockist on 1800 242 100. Interested farmers can sign up for continuing updates on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge at www.multiminchallenge.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Craig’s Multimin treated Angus cows Craig Brewin with mentor Dr Colin Trengove Australia‚Äôs premier Campdrafting competition and performance horse sale gets underway 2019-02-04T04:42:47Z australias-premier-campdrafting-competition-and-performance-horse-sale-gets-underway Australia’s premier Campdrafting competition and performance horse sale, the 12th annual Landmark Classic Campdraft & Sale is currently underway at Tamworth’s Australian Equine Livestock Events Centre (AELEC) – and it’s proving to be another action-packed event. Some of the country’s top competitors are in town ready to battle it out for a share of a total cash and prize pool worth over $270,000. It’s only day three of the nine-day event, and with two days of pre-works and four days of supreme sales to follow the first five days of competitive Campdrafting & Challenging events, there’s still plenty of action to come. The Landmark Classic is free to attend, and tonight’s events kick off from 6pm with Happy Hour at the AELEC Bar during the final of the Prydes EasiFeed Australian Performance Horse Challenge. Due to the growth of our competition program, the Campdraft finals have this year been split over two nights: Tuesday evening’s proceedings will begin with Round 1 of the Dalgety Stallion Shootout, followed by Round 2 of the Prydes EasiFeed National Campdraft Council of Australia Champion Rider, AELEC Arena Bar “Dash for Cash” gelding incentive final, Mavericks Masters Campdraft final and Martins Stock Haulage Open Campdraft final. Wednesday evening will see Round 2 of the Dalgety Stallion Shootout, the final round of the Prydes EasiFeed National Campdraft Council of Australia Champion Rider, Charlie Maher Memorial Young Guns Final and The Landmark Classic Campdraft Final. Among other highlights, the Dalgety Stallion Shootout Final will be held in the indoor arena on Friday night, and promises to be a thrilling event. There are also 60 trade site exhibitions on show, offering a huge range of merchandise from western fashion, artwork and homewares to saddlery and vet products. Entry is FREE every day and evening, and www.landmarklive.com.au has the full program of events. ENDS Media Enquiries: C7EVEN Communications Adam Arndell (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Photography credit - Wild Fillies Photography - top priced horse of the 2018 Classic Sale, Yaven Spinacat sold by John & Jenn Corbett for $130,000 to Hughes Pastoral. The colt was presented by trainer Rob Leach New Year's Resolution - be kinder 2018-12-26T07:09:20Z new-years-resolution-be-kinder Dear Editor, Many New Year resolutions are arduous and hard to maintain, but here's an easy and very satisfying one: be kinder in 2019. Most people understand that causing others to suffer is wrong. It's why we cringe when someone hits a child, beats a dog, or shoots a cat. But when it comes to having consciousness, feeling joy, and experiencing pain, all animals—including humans—are the same and limiting our scope of compassion to those that are most familiar to us allows untold cruelties to be inflicted upon billions of animals on the planet each year. No one would choose to live in a cramped, filthy shed and wallow in their own filth. No feeling, sensitive person would choose for their babies to be torn away from them so that another species could steal their milk. And no one would watch their friends bleed out on a slaughterhouse floor and willingly stand in line for their throats to be slit next. We all share the desire to live free from harm. Consuming meat and dairy is unnecessary, and PETA urges everyone to go vegan—right here, right now. By doing so, you'll spare nearly 200 animals a year a terrifying death. There's simply no easier way to help animals and prevent suffering than by choosing plant-derived foods instead of meat, eggs, and dairy. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Virbac Australia releases end-of-year findings from its national trace mineral challenge. 2018-12-17T05:21:46Z virbac-australia-releases-end-of-year-findings-from-its-national-trace-mineral-challenge As the year draws to a close, animal health company Virbac Australia has collected all available data on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program which invites seven Multimin challengers to share their learnings as they reveal the benefits of Multimin, a trace mineral injection for livestock. From beef producers in Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania, to a dairy producer in Victoria and a Poll Merino breeder in the Southern Tablelands of NSW, Virbac’s challengers have being trialing Multimin’s effects. The trial has explored improvements in areas like conception rates and immunity, body conformation, carcass weight and characteristics, incidence of diseases, growth rates and conception times. With the assistance of expert mentors, challengers have received 12 months worth of free Multimin product and a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors. Each program is aligned to each challenger’s goals and ultimately their bottom line, and challengers have been sharing their program results and experiences online at www.multiminchallenge.com. State by state, some of the key highlights include: QLD: Multimin treated heifers have shown an improved immune response to leptospirosis – and results also showed that animals treated with Multimin and 7 in 1 had higher levels of protection. QLD challenger Don McConnel reports that “animals given Multimin had higher mean antibodies to leptospirosis. On visual appraisal, the animals that have been treated in heifer groups also look in noticeably better condition.” Mentor Matt Ball says that “it’s been great working with Don at Mt Brisbane. We are studying conception rates, immunity, and growth and development responses to trace minerals, and we’ve seen very positive results suggesting that animals treated with Multimin and 7 in 1 had higher levels of protection, with on average higher antibodies to leptospirosis. Heifers also seem to be growing better, with a healthier appearance in the treatment group.” WA: When pregnancy-tested in October, challenger Ryan Willing saw above 90% conception in both groups, with the Multimin-treated animals slightly ahead. Challenge mentor Enoch Bergman reports seeing “fantastic results with Ryan’s cattle. Multimin has proven its worth in this instance and reinforced the importance of investing for the future.” VIC: Multimin played a greater role in supporting calves during their first 12 weeks, says challenger mentor Dr Susan Swaney, who reports that “the Multimin Challenge has given people who have never tried it the chance to see how it performs on their property, and we’ve seen some really great results. We certainly saw differences within the first 12 weeks. The treated calves didn’t seem to suffer from the usual gastric signs that the untreated herd had at the time of weaning. Multimin helped with the adjustment to weaner rations, and they went straight on to the new diet without any issues.” NSW: Challenger mentor Dr Elizabeth Bramley describes Multimin’s impact on sheep weight and carcass characteristics: “The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms to strategic mineral supplementation, which is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth. This strategic approach can better support improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability.” Next year will bring further results for the Multimin challenge. Data due early in 2019 will include weight measurements and MSA grading in steers, pregnancy-testing cows, calving distribution, liver testing, worm egg counts and conception rates. All these factors will influence the performance of livestock and ultimately enhance producer profitability. Challengers are excited to see the longer-term results as they begin to calculate the cost benefit analysis for producers. Dr Jerry Liu, Livestock Nutrition Product Manager at Virbac Australia summarises the impact of those results: “Previous trials have shown that Multimin is able to improve the performance of livestock in these areas. If this is replicated for our challengers, it will have a significant impact on their bottom line.” Judged by both challenge mentors and the public, the winner will be announced in May 2019 and awarded an ‘experience of lifetime’ prize, specifically tailored to their farming system. Exciting results of the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge will be announced in March 2019. To find out more about how Multimin can improve your livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Interested farmers can also sign up for continuing updates on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge at www.multiminchallenge.com About Multimin Virbac's Multimin Injection is a rapidly absorbed source of trace minerals, which can bypass the rumen for direct uptake into the blood in eight hours. The active ingredients are needed for the body to produce two important antioxidants involved in protecting the reproductive and immune systems. For cattle, it is available as a four in one formulation containing copper, selenium, manganese, and zinc. For sheep producers, it is available with or without copper. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: QLD Multimin Challenger, Don McConnel’s Heifers Enoch Bergman and Tony Murdoch Preg-testing at Ryan Willing's, WA Charles Darwin University is the latest to take part in national trace mineral challenge 2018-12-03T02:31:22Z charles-darwin-university-is-the-latest-to-take-part-in-national-trace-mineral-challenge Charles Darwin University (CDU) is expected to announce livestock pregnancy improvements from participation in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program run by animal health company Virbac Australia. The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge gives seven participants the chance to experience first-hand the benefits of Multimin’s trace mineral injection, with assistance from expert mentors. Challengers receive 12 months of free Multimin product and a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors – and they’ll also be in the running to win the experience of a lifetime, specifically tailored to their farming system. With each challenger sharing their program results and experiences, Charles Darwin University’s Katherine Rural Campus trial site is the latest to take part. Based 16 km north of Katherine, the site is managed by Jessica Di Pasquale, Alison Haines and Noah Taylor, who together operate a Brahman stud and Brahman/cross breed commercial herd from an on-site farm and stud at the University’s training facility. Their goals are to increase fertility, conception and productivity and improve immunity and health, under the expert guidance of Multimin mentor Dr Amanda Dunn from Katherine Veterinary Care Centre. As part of the trial, 92 non-pregnant adult cows have been assigned one of two treatment groups at random, and have been given either Multimin or no Multimin (control herd) four weeks before bulls were introduced in November. In March 2019, all trial animals will be pregnancy-tested, and the resulting data will measure each cow’s pregnancy status, foetus age and animal weight to determine the effect of Multimin trace minerals. As Jessica explains, “Multimin injection has been scientifically proven to top up trace minerals, and we’re looking forward to seeing the results. We’ll be sharing our observations over the coming months – and as previous field trials have proven that breeders treated with Multimin have significantly higher conception rates earlier in the calving season, we’re expecting to see improved conception at first cycle from these latest trials.” Dr Jerry Liu, Livestock Nutrition Product Manager at Virbac Australia described the Multimin Challenge as an “extraordinary opportunity for farmers to learn more about animal nutrition. Trace minerals are essential elements for healthy sheep and cattle, and we know that during high demand periods such as joining, weaning and birthing, animals have higher requirements for certain trace minerals. This is sure to be a fascinating study into the effects of a new strategic approach for optimal performance management.” The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge is also part of Virbac’s ongoing commitment to animal health education, with the company supporting students who have a desire to work in agriculture and rural operations in a number of different ways. Through working with CDU on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, the company encourages school leavers to get involved in agriculture and rural operations through Agricultural Training Colleges to become an ag specialist or prepare for jobs in rural and regional sectors. In addition, WA mentor Enoch Bergman recently gave five young vets from Murdoch University hands-on experience with preg-testing and the chance to learn more about the Multimin Challenge – and Virbac also takes in 2-3 students per year, providing invaluable work experience to help nurture Australia’s next generation of agricultural specialists. To find out more about how Multimin can improve livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Interested farmers can also sign up for continuing updates on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge at www.multiminchallenge.com/signup/. About Multimin Virbac's trace mineral injection Multimin 4 in 1 for cattle delivers a balanced ratio of four trace minerals, including selenium, copper, manganese and zinc – while Multimin 3 in 1 injection for sheep and cattle contains selenium, manganese and zinc, bypassing the rumen for direct uptake through the blood in eight hours. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Amanda Dunn and Jessica Beckhouse Charles Darwin University Brahman Cattle Brisbane Ends Use of Live Animals in David Jones Christmas Parade 2018-11-27T23:58:40Z brisbane-ends-use-of-live-animals-in-david-jones-christmas-parade BRISBANE ENDS USE OF LIVE ANIMALS IN DAVID JONES CHRISTMAS PARADE Department Store Tells PETA It Won’t Use Deer, Donkeys or Camels in Annual Festivities For Immediate Release: 28 November 2018 Contact: Trafford Smith; 0406-713-994 traffords@peta.org.au Brisbane – Following numerous appeals from PETA, and public protests by Animal Liberation Queensland highlighting that live-animal displays are demonstrably cruel and can be dangerous to the public, department store David Jones has confirmed that it will not include any animals, including deer, donkeys and camels, in its Christmas Parade through the Brisbane Central District this year. “PETA applauds David Jones’ decision, as there’s nothing merry about using animals as holiday ornaments,” says PETA liaison Emily Rice. “Any other stores or venues tempted to exhibit deer or other animals in their parades to follow David Jones’ compassionate lead.” In its correspondence with David Jones, PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment”—pointed out that deer, who naturally shun human contact, endure a perpetual state of discomfort, and stress at such parades. They’re also often trucked from one event to the next and subjected to a constant barrage of strange noises, human activity, and people trying to touch them. For more information, please visit PETA.org.au.