The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2018-09-25T22:43:44Z IMC19 brings the future of science into focus 2018-09-25T22:43:44Z imc19-brings-the-future-of-science-into-focus-1 Critical discoveries and research that will help to transform health, science and industry are set to be the lasting legacy of the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), according to leaders of the scientific world. Held every four years, IMC19 saw more than 2,100 of the world’s top scientists and researchers from 48 countries come together at ICC Sydney to network, collaborate and discover the latest high-tech instrumentation and systems in microscopy and microanalysis. IMC19 also inspired the next generation of young scientists with its Schools Outreach Program, which welcomed 570 students from 19 schools. The program also featured a “Young Scientists Assembly” where 50 young scientists from around the world enjoyed the opportunity to discuss career planning with some of the most senior figures in the field. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, said the impact of IMC19 would be revealed over time from the global scientific community. “Innovations in microscopy enable us to extend our understanding of ourselves and the world around us. IMC19 brought together leaders in both the development and the application of microscopy in a huge range of disciplines,” he said. “These connections will ultimately lead to breakthroughs, as researchers take the insights from advanced microscopy to develop a treatment for cancer, a vaccine for a virus, or a new 3D printed metallurgical alloy that improves our atmosphere by being strong and light and thereby fuel and greenhouse gas efficient.” The week-long scientific program included presentations by four expert plenary speakers, two Nobel Laureates, 150 invited presenters as well as 26 pre-congress workshops and 463 oral talks, bridging the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. The pioneering IMC19 Outreach Learning Program welcomed high school students to experience the very latest light and electron microscope equipment and a chance to meet with researchers and specialists in microscopy. Mrs Diane Fairweather, Head of Science, Riverstone High School, said the program allowed students to access cutting-edge technology. “This was a great STEM initiative by IMC19 and an amazing experience for the students who came. We don’t have these microscopes at our school and without the IMC19 Outreach Program, most of our students wouldn’t be able to use this equipment,” said Fairweather. “Our students are engaged; they are learning directly from experts on things like using the lens to focus – it’s a real hands-on experience.” The Outreach Program offered students access to the latest equipment including, VR, four scanning electron microscopes, 20 life microscopes and 3D printing. Equipment and demonstrations were supported by Zeiss, Leica, AXT, Keepad Interactive, NewSpec, ATA, Coherent, UNSW Art and Design and Me3D. Citing recent examples of some of the life-changing advancements that have developed as a direct result of microscopy, Dr Alan Finkel, Australia’s Chief Scientist, inspired the audience at IMC19 and set the scene for a week of breakthroughs in his opening address. “An investment in this field (microscopy) is an investment in nanoparticles that target such things as a drug directly to malignant cells; 3D printed lattices that act like tiny factories for T-cells; vital in the new generation of cancer immunotherapies and more,” said Dr Finkel. “Without Microscopy, there is no modern science – end of story.” Professor Paul Munroe, Congress Co-Chair, said IMC19 had laid the foundations for great things. “We are excited to see where the collaborations from IMC19 take the industry, and what new technology and research will be showcased at the next congress in Korea in 2022,” he said. For more information on IMC19 visit: http://imc19.com. IMC19 brings the future of science into focus 2018-09-25T22:34:39Z imc19-brings-the-future-of-science-into-focus Critical discoveries and research that will help to transform health, science and industry are set to be the lasting legacy of the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), according to leaders of the scientific world. Held every four years, IMC19 saw more than 2,100 of the world’s top scientists and researchers from 48 countries come together at ICC Sydney to network, collaborate and discover the latest high-tech instrumentation and systems in microscopy and microanalysis. IMC19 also inspired the next generation of young scientists with its Schools Outreach Program, which welcomed 570 students from 19 schools. The program also featured a “Young Scientists Assembly” where 50 young scientists from around the world enjoyed the opportunity to discuss career planning with some of the most senior figures in the field. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, said the impact of IMC19 would be revealed over time from the global scientific community. “Innovations in microscopy enable us to extend our understanding of ourselves and the world around us. IMC19 brought together leaders in both the development and the application of microscopy in a huge range of disciplines” he said. “These connections will ultimately lead to breakthroughs, as researchers take the insights from advanced microscopy to develop a treatment for cancer, a vaccine for a virus, or a new 3D printed metallurgical alloy that improves our atmosphere by being strong and light and thereby fuel and greenhouse gas efficient.” The week-long scientific program included presentations by four expert plenary speakers, two Nobel Laureates, 150 invited presenters as well as 26 pre-congress workshops and 463 oral talks, bridging the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. The pioneering IMC19 Outreach Learning Program welcomed high school students to experience the very latest light and electron microscope equipment and a chance to meet with researchers and specialists in microscopy. Mrs Diane Fairweather, Head of Science, Riverstone Highschool, said the program allowed students to access cutting-edge technology. “This was a great STEM initiative by IMC19 and an amazing experience for the students who came. We don’t have these microscopes at our school and without the IMC19 Outreach Program, most of our students wouldn’t be able to use this equipment,” said Fairweather. “Our students are engaged; they are learning directly from experts on things like using the lens to focus – it’s a real hands-on experience.” The Outreach Program offered students access to the latest equipment including, VR, four scanning electron microscopes, 20 life microscopes and 3D printing. Equipment and demonstrations were supported by Zeiss, Leica, AXT, Keepad Interactive, NewSpec, ATA, Coherent, UNSW Art and Design and Me3D. Citing recent examples of some of the life-changing advancements that have developed as a direct result of microscopy, Dr Alan Finkel, Australia’s Chief Scientist, inspired the audience at IMC19 and set the scene for a week of breakthroughs in his opening address. “An investment in this field (microscopy) is an investment in nanoparticles that target such things as a drug directly to malignant cells; 3D printed lattices that act like tiny factories for T-cells; vital in the new generation of cancer immunotherapies and more,” said Dr Finkel. “Without Microscopy, there is no modern science – end of story.” Professor Paul Munroe, Congress Co-Chair, said IMC19 had laid the foundations for great things. “We are excited to see where the collaborations from IMC19 take the industry, and what new technology and research will be showcased at the next congress in Korea in 2022,” he said. For more information on IMC19 visit: http://imc19.com. Images: IMC19 Outreach Learning Program: Notes to editors: Interviews with Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, IMC19 Interviews with Professor Paul Munroe, Congress Co-Chair, IMC 19 Media enquires contact Zadro Sinead Andrews | Account Coordinator | Zadro 02 9212 7867 | sinead@zadroagency.com.au Elizabeth Williams | Group Account Director | Zadro 02 9212 7867 | elizabeth@zadroagency.com.au NOTE: About the 19th International Microscopy Congress, 9 – 14 September 2018 Held once every four years, the International Microscopy Congress (IMC) is the preeminent meeting for researchers, practitioners, decision makers, national microscopy societies, industry partners and stakeholders involved in microscopy sciences from all over the world. Now in its 19th year, IMC19 ‘Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences’ is the only platform to bring together international, national and local professionals to discover new opportunities, uncover findings, learn techniques, collaborate with peers, and network with global leaders in the field of microscopy. About the Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) The Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) is Australia’s industry association for the promotion, co-operation and development of microscopy, microanalysis, and related techniques across a broad range of scientific disciplines. About the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM) The International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM) comprises microscopy societies from all around the world to contribute to the advancement of microscopy in all its aspects. Microscope that gets to the heart of matter 2018-09-10T03:41:58Z microscope-that-gets-to-the-heart-of-matter Two Nobel Laureates and the NSW Chief Scientist & Engineer will officially unveil a vital piece of scientific infrastructure at the University of Sydney at a special event. The Thermo Fisher Themis-Z transmission electron microscope (TEM) has the highest resolution of any microscope in Australia. Its addition to the University of Sydney will provide researchers with unparalleled access to the mysteries of the atomic structure of materials. The 4.5-metre tall microscope is housed in the purpose-built $150 million Sydney Nanoscience Hub in a room that is shielded from electromagnetic interferences and ‘floats’ architecturally independent from the building to minimise vibrations. The resolution of this analysis technique is breathtaking. The machine can obtain images with resolution better than 0.06 billionths of a metre (0.06 nanometres). That is about 10 times smaller than the distance between silicon atoms or five times smaller than the distance between carbon atoms in diamond. The microscope, which is available for industry as well, also has applications in geosciences, mining, chemical and mechanical engineering. The new NSW Chief Scientist & Engineer, Professor Hugh Durrant-Whyte will unveil the device in his first week of his official functions alongside two Nobel Laureates in Chemistry, Prof. Dan Shechtman, The Technion, Israel and Professor Joachim Frank, Columbia University, USA, who are visiting Sydney for the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), which is jointly hosted by the University of Sydney and UNSW. Event details: What: Sydney Microscopy and Microanalysis launch event Aberration-corrected Transmission Electron Microscope Where: Research Foyer, Sydney Nanoscience Hub, Physics Road, University of Sydney When: Tuesday, 11 September 2018. 1.45pm for 2pm start. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9-14 September, at ICC Sydney, will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. Complimentary media passes to the launch event are available; apply by sending your name, position and publication title to sinead@zadroagency.com.au. Complimentary media passes to IMC19 are also available; apply by sending your name, position and publication title to sinead@zadroagency.com.au. Image: The Thermo Fisher Themis-Z transmission electron microscope (TEM) How many scientists does it take to look through a microscope? 2018-09-06T02:03:09Z how-many-scientists-does-it-take-to-look-through-a-microscope More than 2,000 of the world’s top scientific brains will explore new findings, share research, and experience the latest state-of-the-art scientific microscopy equipment helping to reinvent and expand human knowledge, in Sydney next week. Field emission guns and new electron exploration systems are two of the many innovations and leading advancements in medical science that will be on show when the world’s largest microscopic community descends on Sydney for the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19). The event, held every four years, starts on 9 September and will see presentations by world-renowned thought leaders and Nobel Laureates Professor Dan Shechtman and Professor Joachim Frank, from The Technion Israel, who won the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work as founder of the single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). By bringing together experts working across a multitude of academic and industrial fields, IMC19 will showcase - and define - how clear, crisp microscopic magnification, helps advance life on Earth. The genesis of our future’s most significant discoveries including reproductive breakthroughs and a step towards a cure for cancer can be found at this world-famous science event and the multi-million-dollar equipment on display. Tek-Event, Sydney based manufacturer of equipment dedicated to the field of human and animal reproductive technologies (ART), will showcase its range of brand new technologies providing a safe environment for tissue observation. Dieter Regel, Sales Director, Tek-Event, commented on the increasing requirement to provide accurate temperature control as well as CO2 and humidity in the latest technologies advancing human IVF laboratories, animal research and veterinary ART facilities. “Researchers who have the requirement to view cells or tissue microscopically, are often challenged when their environment is not stable. TEK-Event are excited to showcase our latest Cell-Tek microscope chambers, which helps create a controlled environment for examination in many fields of research, including the handling of oocytes and embryos in ART,” said Regel. Thermo Fisher Scientific will offer attendees a chance to take part in live demonstrations with technical experts working in innovative software and automated microscopy products and showcase a wide range of microscopy solutions. Attendees can register for a learning lunch with ZEISS, to experience their innovative microscopy technologies and applications. Sessions will cover 3D electron microscopy; X-ray microscopy and analytical microscopy and guests can win a ZEISS VR One Plus virtual reality headset. Tek-Event, Thermo Fisher Scientific and ZEISS will be joined by over 60 other confirmed exhibitors at IMC19, including Jeol, Quorum Technologies, Tescan, Technoorg Linda Co Ltd, Delmic, Hitachi, Leica and Nano Technologies Solutions. Delegates will also enjoy a range of activities and a vibrant social program in conjunction with the congress, aimed to engage attendees and help spark new connections among the scientific community. The IMC19 Outreach Learning Program will host 21 schools across Australia, to offer students the chance to undertake four storyline-based challenges, featuring the latest light and microscopy equipment alongside leading researchers and instrument specialists. Microscopy Australia will present a unique exhibition during the congress, Stories & Structures - New Connections, bringing together microscopy and Indigenous art through visual and story-telling parallels. The exhibition will showcase 21 artworks and 24 micrographs, as well as feature live painting by Indigenous artist Kurun Warun in residence. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9-14 September, at ICC Sydney, will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. Exposing “serial killers”, Quasi-Periodic Materials, and Sub-particles at IMC19 Sydney 2018-08-06T04:14:11Z exposing-serial-killers-quasi-periodic-materials-and-sub-particles-at-imc19-sydney Examining ‘serial killer’ cells and their behaviour will be at the centre of leading Australian Immunologist, Dr Misty Jenkins’, plenary talk - Understanding Serial Killers: Investigating the Function of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes using Microscopy’ at IMC19 in Sydney next month. Approximately 1,600 Australians are diagnosed with brain cancer each year. Dr Misty Jenkins, NHMRC RD Wright Fellow and Laboratory Head at Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, is seeking to change that, and will share how microscopy is directing her research into fighting brain cancer. Ahead of the IMC19 Congress, Dr Jenkins shares how her research is using imaging to understand how killer T-cells in the immune system could be modified to develop a cure for brain cancer. “T-cells are like the snipers of the immune system, they take out very specific targets and throw grenades at them to make them blow up. These cells are genetically designed to kill cancer cells, and we image this process to uncover new insights into the behaviour of these engineered killers,” said Dr Jenkins. With a series of accolades including the L’Oréal for Women in Science Fellowship (2013) and the Westpac/Australian Financial Review Top100 Women of Influence Award (2016), Ballarat-born Dr Jenkins is a testament to the high calibre of scientists that will be representing Australia at the Congress. It is such an exciting time for science, and this is our chance to show the world the great work we are doing on our own shores. But it is also a rare and unique opportunity to collaborate with, learn from and share the stage with renowned scientists from across the globe,” said Dr Jenkins. Dr Jenkins will be joined by the world’s most prominent plenary speakers including: Nobel Laureate Professor Dan Shechtman, from Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, presenting on The Discovery of Quasi-Periodic Materials – The Role of TEM Associate Professor Jennifer Dionne, from Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford, USA, who recently featured on Oprah Winfrey’s list of “50 things that will make you say ‘Wow’!” with In Situ Visualisation of Photochemical Transformations at the Single and Sub-particle Level Professor Zhiwei Shan, from Xi’an Jiaotong University, China, who has published over 70 prestigious papers and presented more than 130 invited talks discussing Mechanical Testing Laboratory Inside TEM The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9-14 September, at ICC Sydney, will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. To register and for more information: http://imc19.com Image: Dr. Misty Jenkins, Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, Australia Professor Dan Shechtman, The Technion, Israel Assoc. Prof. Jennifer Dionne, Stanford, USA Prof. Zhiwei Shan, Xi’an Jiaotong University, China How cannabis research revealed the Endocannabinoid System and its influence on homeostasis 2018-07-23T00:29:02Z how-cannabis-research-revealed-the-endocannabinoid-system-and-its-influence-on-homeostasis Medicinal cannabis, its use and benefits for illness and disease are still being appreciated, and with new legislation introduced in Australia to legalise the use and supply of medicinal cannabis means the spotlight is on the medical profession to see how this herbal medicine can treat chronic illness. Justin Sinclair, an Australian Pharmacognosist and Educator will share his insights at the upcoming A5M Medical Conference in Melbourne and present: Cannabis Phytochemistry and the Endocannabinoid System. For more than 15 years Justin’s research and experience spans several scientific disciplines, including cultivation, botany, plant genetics, ethnopharmacology, and analytical phytochemistry. As coordinator for the Australian Medicinal Cannabis Research and Education Collaboration at NICM Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Sinclair is an advocate for medicinal cannabis research and believes worldwide studies have proven medicinal cannabis has provided patients with significant health benefits. “In countries where cannabis is legal, where they have a standardised medical supply of cannabis, the majority of patients are utilising it to treat chronic pain. Studies have shown benefits for many other illnesses, such as intractable epilepsy (non-responsive to normal modern pharmacological treatment), and evidence from overseas countries has demonstrated that medicinal cannabis may reduce spasticity in multiple sclerosis, amongst other illnesses. “Years of research has discovered a broad ranging neuro-modulatory system involved in most facets of homeostasis. This system is known as the Endocannabinoid System and was revealed only through research conducted on the Cannabis genus,” acknowledged Mr Sinclair. Sinclair believes that this is one of the greatest scientific discoveries in the last 50 years, with ongoing research into the endocannabinoid system likely to elucidate our understanding of various human diseases, with existing research suggesting that the endocannabinoid system is one of the primary regulators of homeostasis in the body. Speaking at the A5M Medical Conference in Melbourne, Mr Sinclair will discuss the discovery of the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) with a focus on receptors, ligands and enzymes that are involved in this modulator of homeostasis within the body. The 12th Annual A5M Anti-Ageing & Aesthetic Conference will take place on Saturday 4 and Sunday 5 August 2018 delivering cutting-edge research into this new frontier at Sofitel Melbourne on Collins, with a Preconference Workshop on Friday, 3 August 2018. To register for the Conference, visit: www.a5m.net Western Sydney University’s NICM Health Research Institute (NICM) is Australia’s leader in integrative and complementary medicine research and policy. As an ERA 5 ranking institute, NICM is globally recognised for its world-class research and innovations in integrative and complementary medicine. An initiative of NICM, the Australian Medicinal Cannabis Research and Education Collaboration (AMCREC) brings together a highly skilled transdisciplinary team and state-of-the-art facilities, providing a platform for high-quality, independent research, education and consultancy services in medicinal cannabis. For more information about NICM Health Research Institute, visit: www.nicm.edu.au Hashtag: #A5MConf18 - ENDS - - ENDS - Media Contacts: For further information, images, interviews or industry commentary, please contact: Debbie Bradley, Group Account Director | +61 2 9212 7867 | debbie@zadroagency.com.au Julie Donovan, Senior Account Manager | +61 2 9212 7867 | julie@zadroagency.com.au Notes to editor: The AustralAsian Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine (A5M) is committed to providing medical practitioners, pharmacists and allied health professionals with support and education about the latest evidence-based methods to improve patient outcomes as they age - both internal and external. A5M is currently about to celebrate its 12th Annual Conference, one of the longest running conferences of its kind, which will take place on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th August at Sofitel Melbourne on Collins For more information on A5M visit: www.A5M.net Connect through social media channels: Facebook: /A5Meducation Twitter: /A5Meducation LinkedIn: /A5M Medical Conference to Address Inner and Outer Health 2018-07-09T04:13:59Z medical-conference-to-address-inner-and-outer-health In August 2018, the AustralAsian Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine (A5M) will host their 12th Annual Conference and Expo in Melbourne, presenting an unrivalled line up of Australian and international aesthetic, integrative and anti-ageing experts to build the bridge between inner and outer health. With the continued integration of evidence-based conventional medicine with the complementary and aesthetics industry and a rise in a multidisciplinary and holistic approach to patient care – the A5M Conference will provide a truly encompassing view for medical professionals to learn, discuss and drive the future of integrative medicine across Australasia. Delegates will hear from over 20 speakers discussing interventions for both internal and external causes of chronic conditions, while focusing on examining the impact that exercise and lifestyle, diet and nutrition, supplementation, hormonal/metabolic imbalance and genetic factors, have on the ageing process. EVENT DETAILS: WHAT: AustralAsian Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine Annual Conference WHEN: Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th August 2018 TIME: 8:00am – 5:30pm WHERE: Sofitel Melbourne on Collins PRICE: Members: $1050; Non-members: $1250 WEBSITE: https://www.a5m.net/conference-information/2018-annual-conference The Conference covers a range of topics including: Connecting Inner and Outer Health Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Disease Telomeres, Cancer and Ageing Metabolic and Hormonal Health Issues Reversing Mild Cognitive Decline Brain Health Healthy ageing and wellbeing New Frontiers in Medicine: Medical Cannabis And much more! To register, visit: https://www.a5m.net/conference-information/a5m-annual-conference/2018-a5m-conference Hashtag: #A5MConf18 - ENDS - For further information, images, interviews or industry commentary, please contact: Debbie Bradley, Account Director | +612 9212 7867 | debbie@zadroagency.com.au Julie Donovan, Senior Account Manager | +612 9212 7867 | julie@zadroagency.com.au Notes to editor: The AustralAsian Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine (A5M) is committed to providing medical practitioners, pharmacists and allied health professionals with support and education about the latest evidence-based methods to improve patient outcomes as they age - both internal and external. A5M is currently about to celebrate its 12th Annual Conference, one of the longest running conferences of its kind, which will take place on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th August at Sofitel Melbourne on Collins For more information on A5M visit: www.A5M.net Connect through social media channels: Facebook: /A5Meducation Twitter: /A5Meducation LinkedIn: /A5M The role of A5M is to develop and promote all aspects of preventative, anti-ageing and integrative medicine among practitioners and the community A5M is dedicated to educating medical practitioners, allied healthcare professionals, scientist and researchers by providing training, certification and continuing education in preventative, integrative and anti-ageing medicine As the leading academic body of Anti-Ageing Medicine in AustralAsia, A5M offers Certification and access to a world-class Fellowship Program in Anti-Ageing, Regenerative and Functional Medicine with Metabolic Medicine Institute (MMI) and the American Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine (A4M) The principles of A5M education and programs are based on scientific evidence based medicine, which involves the integration of the five pillars of ageing: diet and nutrition, supplementation, hormones, genetics and exercise and lifestyle Bridging the Sciences at the 19th International Microscopy Congress 2018-06-03T23:56:20Z bridging-the-sciences-at-the-19th-international-microscopy-congress Sydney will host Nobel Laureates Professor Dan Shechtman, from Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and Professor Joachim Frank, from Columbia University, USA together with global authorities at the world’s largest and most diverse gathering of microscopy and microanalysis professionals at the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9 – 14 September 2018, in Sydney. Hosted by the internationally renowned Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) and the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM), IMC19 will shine a light on Australia’s significant and exciting contribution to a collaborative, multidisciplinary industry that affects everyone’s lives - every single day. IMC19 will also welcome local and international visionaries, including Dr Misty Jenkins, Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, Australia, Associate Professor Jennifer Dionne, Stanford University, USA, and Professor Zhiwei Shan, Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. They, together with the world’s scientific leaders will debate and discuss the latest insights and approaches in policy, research and programs relevant to practitioners, providers, government and academia. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, IMC19 said it was an honour to be highlighting the work Australians are doing in microscopy to the world through this highly coveted event. “IMC19 has an impressive line-up of global thought leaders set to challenge and explore the latest technology and practices in microscopy. “However, this is Australia’s scientific community’s chance to shine and we believe our international peers will be pleasantly surprised by the amount and depth of advancements happening on our shores. “The exhibition floor will be awash with cutting-edge technology, imaging techniques and state-of-the-art products and services from around Australia and the globe, that are destined to transform our understanding of the world around us. “The Congress is the only one of its kind, crucial for bringing together the brightest scientific and technical minds to collaborate, cross-pollinate and bridge disciplines,” said Ringer. IMC19 is offering 50 young scientists an opportunity to attend an unmissable platform to network with experts in their field, the IFSM Young Scientists Assembly. Held on 9 September 2018 at the University of Sydney, they will meet, discuss and learn from academic and industry leaders. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19) will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. To register and for more information: http://imc19.com Australian Scientists Under the Microscope 2018-05-22T22:30:00Z australian-scientists-under-the-microscope Sydney will host Nobel Laureates Professor Dan Shechtman, from Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and Professor Joachim Frank, from Columbia University, USA together with global authorities at the world’s largest and most diverse gathering of microscopy and microanalysis professionals at the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9 – 14 September 2018, in Sydney. Hosted by the internationally renowned Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) and the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM), IMC19 will shine a light on Australia’s significant and exciting contribution to a collaborative, multidisciplinary industry that affects everyone’s lives - every single day. IMC19 will also welcome local and international visionaries, including Dr Misty Jenkins, Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, Australia, Associate Professor Jennifer Dionne, Stanford University, USA, and Professor Zhiwei Shan, Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. They, together with the world’s scientific leaders will debate and discuss the latest insights and approaches in policy, research and programs relevant to practitioners, providers, government and academia. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, IMC19 said it was an honour to be highlighting the work Australians are doing in microscopy to the world through this highly coveted event. “IMC19 has an impressive line-up of global thought leaders set to challenge and explore the latest technology and practices in microscopy. “However, this is Australia’s scientific community’s chance to shine and we believe our international peers will be pleasantly surprised by the amount and depth of advancements happening on our shores. “The exhibition floor will be awash with cutting-edge technology, imaging techniques and state-of-the-art products and services from around Australia and the globe, that are destined to transform our understanding of the world around us. “The Congress is the only one of its kind, crucial for bringing together the brightest scientific and technical minds to collaborate, cross-pollinate and bridge disciplines,” said Ringer. IMC19 is offering 50 young scientists an opportunity to attend an unmissable platform to network with experts in their field, the IFSM Young Scientists Assembly. Held on 9 September 2018 at the University of Sydney, they will meet, discuss and learn from academic and industry leaders. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19) will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. To register and for more information: http://imc19.com ‘Eat for Your Eyes’ this Macula Month (1-31 May) 2018-05-22T22:14:55Z eat-for-your-eyes-this-macula-month-1-31-may-4 ‘Eat for Your Eyes’ this Macula Month (1-31 May) Macular disease is the leading cause of blindness in Australia Knowledge is definitely power in the defence against macular disease, yet a recent study by Macular Disease Foundation Australia has highlighted the need for Australians to be more aware of macular disease and how to minimise the risk. Macular disease is a term used to describe a number of diseases that affect the macula (located at the centre of the retina, at the back of the eye). The macula is responsible for our detailed central vision – what we see straight in front of us. Two of the most common diseases affecting the macula include diabetic eye disease (such as diabetic retinopathy) and age-related macular degeneration. Despite macular disease being the leading cause of blindness in Australia, a YouGov Galaxy study, commissioned by Macular Disease Foundation Australia, indicates that 91 per cent of Australians are unsure or unaware of the function of the macula. One of the most common diseases affecting the macula, diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of preventable blindness in working-aged Australians. Yet, the study shows that 60 per cent of people diagnosed with diabetes do not know what the macula’s function is. Alarmingly, 64 per cent of those diagnosed with diabetes are unaware that the eyes can be affected by diabetes. When it comes to reducing the risk of macular disease, the study showed that almost a quarter (23 per cent) of Australians aged 50 and over don’t know what to do to reduce the risk of macular disease. So, what can you do to reduce the risk of macular disease? According to Macular Disease Foundation Australia, there are some steps that can reduce the risk of macular disease. These include regularly having a comprehensive eye test, including a macula check, don’t smoke and maintain an eye-healthy lifestyle and diet. What is an eye-healthy diet? Macular Disease Foundation Australia offers these three tips: Eat a healthy, well-balanced diet. A well-balanced diet high in antioxidants, vitamins and other nutrients can help keep our eyes healthy. Eat fish two to three times a week.Dark green leafy vegetables and fresh fruit daily, and a handful of nuts per week. Whenever possible, choose low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates instead of high GI. Ita Buttrose, AO OBE, Patron of Macular Disease Foundation Australia says, “May is Macula Month, and what better time to make the appointment for a comprehensive eye test. Whether you are diabetic, aged over 50 or, like me, are at higher risk of macular disease because of family history, I encourage everyone to take steps now to reduce their risk of macular disease. My family history means that I have a 50 per cent chance of developing macular degeneration, and my children are equally at risk. Consequently, we all do some kind of regular exercise, watch our weight, eat well and have regular eye tests. As a journalist and author, I can’t imagine losing my sight and never being able to read again.” Ms Dee Hopkins, Chief Executive Officer of Macular Disease Foundation Australia says, “Nutrition plays an important role in optimising macular health and reducing the risk of macular disease. Eating a healthy, well-balanced diet which includes eye healthy foods is good for overall wellbeing, as well as eye health.” “Important antioxidants for eye health include lutein and zeaxanthin. These are present in high concentrations in a healthy macula and help to protect the eye. They are found in dark green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale, as well as naturally yellow fruit and vegetables like sweet corn and capsicum. In addition, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium are important antioxidants for a healthy macula. “Many people in our community are at risk of developing macular disease but just don’t know it. Those over 50 are at higher risk of age-related macular degeneration, and everyone with diabetes is at risk of developing vision loss from diabetic eye disease. “No matter what your age, if you have sudden changes in your vision you need to have your eyes tested immediately. “During Macula Month, we hope that people think about their macula health, learn the risk factors associated with macular disease and have a regular, comprehensive eye examination, including having their macula checked.” For information about macular disease, or to talk about what to do if you or a loved one has been diagnosed, contact Macular Disease Foundation Australia on Ph. 1800 111 709 or visit www.mdfoundation.com.au Download your free Macula Menu here ENDS For media enquiries, please contact: Cheryl Pettinau, QUAY Communications Kylie Ironside, QUAY Communications Ph. 02 9386 9161 or 0424 157 714 Ph. 02 9386 9161 or 0439 918 078 E. cheryl@quaycommunications.com.au E. kylie@quaycommunications.com.au Notes to the Editor: About Macular Disease Foundation Australia Macular Disease Foundation Australia’s (MDFA) vision is to reduce the incidence and impact of macular disease in Australia through education, awareness, research, support services and representation. It is a national charity providing independent, free, expert advice on preventing and living well with macular disease. For more information call 1800 111 709 or visit www.mdfoundation.com.au About Macula Month – 1 to 31 May 2018 Macula Month is an initiative of Macular Disease Foundation Australia and runs for the month of May. It is an annual campaign designed to raise awareness of macular disease, which includes age-related macular degeneration and diabetic eye disease, along with other less common diseases of the macula. Macular disease is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in Australia. ‘Awareness of macular disease’, study conducted by YouGov Galaxy, commissioned by Macular Disease Foundation Australia between 1 and 4 March, 2018, comprising 1,020 Australians aged 18 years and older. Macular Disease Foundation Australia – Macular Degeneration booklet ‘Eyes on the future - A clear outlook on age-related macular degeneration’. Report by Deloitte Access Economics & Macular Degeneration Foundation, 2011. 2018 prevalence estimates are derived from a straight-line extrapolation between 2015 and 2020 estimates in this report. Guidelines for the Management of Diabetic Retinopathy. NHMRC 2008. ‘Eat for Your Eyes’ this Macula Month (1-31 May) 2018-05-14T21:00:00Z eat-for-your-eyes-this-macula-month-1-31-may-3 ‘Eat for Your Eyes’ this Macula Month (1-31 May) Macular disease is the leading cause of blindness in Australia Knowledge is definitely power in the defence against macular disease, yet a recent study by Macular Disease Foundation Australia has highlighted the need for Australians to be more aware of macular disease and how to minimise the risk. Macular disease is a term used to describe a number of diseases that affect the macula (located at the centre of the retina, at the back of the eye). The macula is responsible for our detailed central vision – what we see straight in front of us. Two of the most common diseases affecting the macula include diabetic eye disease (such as diabetic retinopathy) and age-related macular degeneration. Despite macular disease being the leading cause of blindness in Australia, a YouGov Galaxy study, commissioned by Macular Disease Foundation Australia, indicates that 91 per cent of Australians are unsure or unaware of the function of the macula.[1] One of the most common diseases affecting the macula, diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of preventable blindness in working-aged Australians. Yet, the study shows that 60 per cent of people diagnosed with diabetes do not know what the macula’s function is. Alarmingly, 64 per cent of those diagnosed with diabetes are unaware that the eyes can be affected by diabetes. When it comes to reducing the risk of macular disease, the study showed that almost a quarter (23 per cent) of Australians aged 50 and over don’t know what to do to reduce the risk of macular disease. So, what can you do to reduce the risk of macular disease? According to Macular Disease Foundation Australia, there are some steps that can reduce the risk of macular disease. These include regularly having a comprehensive eye test, including a macula check, don’t smoke and maintain an eye-healthy lifestyle and diet. What is an eye-healthy diet? Macular Disease Foundation Australia offers these three tips: Eat a healthy, well-balanced diet. A well-balanced diet high in antioxidants, vitamins and other nutrients can help keep our eyes healthy. Eat fish two to three times a week. Dark green leafy vegetables and fresh fruit daily, and a handful of nuts per week. Whenever possible, choose low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates instead of high GI. Ita Buttrose, AO OBE, Patron of Macular Disease Foundation Australia says, “May is Macula Month, and what better time to make the appointment for a comprehensive eye test. Whether you are diabetic, aged over 50 or, like me, are at higher risk of macular disease because of family history, I encourage everyone to take steps now to reduce their risk of macular disease. My family history means that I have a 50 per cent chance of developing macular degeneration, and my children are equally at risk. Consequently, we all do some kind of regular exercise, watch our weight, eat well and have regular eye tests. As a journalist and author, I can’t imagine losing my sight and never being able to read again.” Ms Dee Hopkins, Chief Executive Officer of Macular Disease Foundation Australia says, “Nutrition plays an important role in optimising macular health and reducing the risk of macular disease. Eating a healthy, well-balanced diet which includes eye healthy foods is good for overall wellbeing, as well as eye health.” “Important antioxidants for eye health include lutein and zeaxanthin. These are present in high concentrations in a healthy macula and help to protect the eye. They are found in dark green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale, as well as naturally yellow fruit and vegetables like sweet corn and capsicum. In addition, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and selenium are important antioxidants for a healthy macula.[2] “Many people in our community are at risk of developing macular disease but just don’t know it. Those over 50 are at higher risk of age-related macular degeneration[3], and everyone with diabetes is at risk of developing vision loss from diabetic eye disease[4]. “No matter what your age, if you have sudden changes in your vision you need to have your eyes tested immediately. “During Macula Month, we hope that people think about their macula health, learn the risk factors associated with macular disease and have a regular, comprehensive eye examination, including having their macula checked.” For information about macular disease, or to talk about what to do if you or a loved one has been diagnosed, contact Macular Disease Foundation Australia on Ph. 1800 111 709 or visit www.mdfoundation.com.au Download your free Macula Menu here ENDS For media enquiries, please contact: Cheryl Pettinau, QUAY Communications Kylie Ironside, QUAY Communications Ph. 02 9386 9161 or 0424 157 714 Ph. 02 9386 9161 or 0439 918 078 E. cheryl@quaycommunications.com.au E. kylie@quaycommunications.com.au Notes to the Editor: About Macular Disease Foundation Australia Macular Disease Foundation Australia’s (MDFA) vision is to reduce the incidence and impact of macular disease in Australia through education, awareness, research, support services and representation. It is a national charity providing independent, free, expert advice on preventing and living well with macular disease. For more information call 1800 111 709 or visit www.mdfoundation.com.au About Macula Month – 1 to 31 May 2018 Macula Month is an initiative of Macular Disease Foundation Australia and runs for the month of May. It is an annual campaign designed to raise awareness of macular disease, which includes age-related macular degeneration and diabetic eye disease, along with other less common diseases of the macula. Macular disease is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in Australia. [1] ‘Awareness of macular disease’, study conducted by YouGov Galaxy, commissioned by Macular Disease Foundation Australia between 1 and 4 March, 2018, comprising 1,020 Australians aged 18 years and older. [2] Macular Disease Foundation Australia – Macular Degeneration booklet [3] ‘Eyes on the future - A clear outlook on age-related macular degeneration’. Report by Deloitte Access Economics & Macular Degeneration Foundation, 2011. 2018 prevalence estimates are derived from a straight-line extrapolation between 2015 and 2020 estimates in this report. [4] Guidelines for the Management of Diabetic Retinopathy. NHMRC 2008. Australian macular disease study released today indicates 64% of those diagnosed with diabetes don’t know it can affect their eyes 2018-04-30T21:30:00Z australian-macular-disease-study-released-today-indicates-64-of-those-diagnosed-with-diabetes-dont-know-it-can-affect-their-eyes MEDIA RELEASE 1 May 2018 Australian macular disease study released today indicates 64% of those diagnosed with diabetes don’t know it can affect their eyes Common diseases affecting the macula, including diabetic eye disease and age-related macular degeneration, can lead to vision loss and blindness Marking the launch of the inaugural Macula Month (May), study results released today by Macular Disease Foundation Australia highlight the need for Australians, particularly those living with diabetes, to be more aware of macular disease and how to minimise the risk. Macular disease is a term used to describe a number of diseases that affect the macula (located at the centre of the retina, at the back of the eye). Two of the most common diseases affecting the macula include diabetic eye disease (such as diabetic retinopathy) and age-related macular degeneration. Despite macular disease being the leading cause of blindness in Australia, a YouGov Galaxy study, commissioned by Macular Disease Foundation Australia, indicates that 91 per cent of Australians are unsure or unaware of the function of the macula.[1] One of the most common diseases affecting the macula, diabetic eye disease is the leading cause of preventable blindness in working-aged Australians. Yet, the study shows that 60 per cent of people diagnosed with diabetes do not know what the macula’s function is. Alarmingly, 64 per cent of those diagnosed with diabetes are unaware that the eyes can be affected by diabetes. Ms Dee Hopkins, Chief Executive Officer of Macular Disease Foundation Australia says the findings of this study are concerning because everyone diagnosed with diabetes is at risk of developing diabetic eye disease. “If you are diagnosed with diabetes, having a comprehensive eye test every two years should be a priority. It is important to let your optometrist know that you have been diagnosed with diabetes and ask about your macula. Macula Month is the perfect time to make that appointment,” says Ms Hopkins. Professor Greg Johnson, CEO of Diabetes Australia agrees that these findings are concerning, particularly when you consider the prevalence of diabetes in Australia. “Around 1.7 million Australians are currently living with diabetes. Approximately 1.2 million know they have the condition, while an estimated 500,000 are living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes.[2] Of the 1.2 million people who have been diagnosed, more than 300,000 (between 25 and 35 per cent) have some degree of diabetic retinopathy, and about 65,000 have progressed to sight-threatening eye disease.[3], [4] “We strongly encourage people diagnosed with diabetes to have regular eye tests, and to ask a health professional about the health of their eyes. “It’s also important for people at risk of type 2 diabetes to get their eyes checked. For some people, a visit to the optometrist or ophthalmologist could be the first time a health professional notices the signs of type 2 diabetes,” says Professor Johnson. The study does contain some good news. It shows that the number of Australians aged over 50 who are aware of having their macula checked in the last two years has risen from one in three in 2007 to two in three in 2018. Ms Hopkins says, “Many people in our community are at risk of developing macular disease but just don’t know it. Those over 50 are at higher risk of age-related macular degeneration[5], and everyone with diabetes is at risk of developing vision loss from diabetic eye disease[6]. “No matter what your age, if you have sudden changes in your vision you need to have your eyes tested immediately.” While there has been improvement in the number of people having their macula checked, when it comes to reducing the risk of macular disease, the survey showed that almost a quarter (23 per cent) of Australians aged 50 and over don’t know what to do to reduce the risk of macular disease. According to Macular Disease Foundation Australia, there are some steps that can reduce the risk of macular disease. These include: Regularly have a comprehensive eye test and ask about your macula. If you smoke, quit! Maintain an eye-healthy diet and lifestyle. Ms Hopkins says, “During Macula Month, we hope that people think about their macula health, learn the risk factors associated with macular disease and have a regular, comprehensive eye examination, including having their macula checked. “Knowledge is definitely power in the defence against macular disease, so it’s imperative that Australians learn what they can do to minimise their risk.” For information about macular disease, or to talk about what to do if you or a loved one has been diagnosed, contact Macular Disease Foundation Australia on 1800 111 709 or visit www.mdfoundation.com.au ENDS For media enquiries, please contact: Cheryl Pettinau, QUAY Communications Kylie Ironside, QUAY Communications Ph. 02 9386 9161 or 0424 157 714 Ph. 02 9386 9161 or 0439 918 078 E. cheryl@quaycommunications.com.au E. kylie@quaycommunications.com.au Notes to the Editor: About Macular Disease Foundation Australia Macular Disease Foundation Australia’s (MDFA) vision is to reduce the incidence and impact of macular disease in Australia through education, awareness, research, support services and representation. It is a national charity providing independent, free, expert advice on preventing and living well with macular disease. For more information call 1800 111 709 or visit www.mdfoundation.com.au About Macula Month – 1 to 31 May 2018 Macula Month is an initiative of Macular Disease Foundation Australia and runs for the month of May. It is an annual campaign designed to raise awareness of macular disease, which includes age-related macular degeneration and diabetic eye disease, along with other less common diseases of the macula. Macular disease is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in Australia. About Macular Disease Did you know? The macula is located at the centre of the retina, at the back of the eye. The macula is responsible for our detailed central vision – what we see straight in front of us. Diseases and conditions which can affect the macula include (but are not limited to): Age-related Macular Degeneration Diabetic Retinopathy Best’s Disease Macular Hole Macular Pucker Macular Telangiectasia Myopic Macular Degeneration Retinal Detachment Retinitis Pigmentosa Retinal Vein Occlusion Stargardt’s Disease. Two of the most common diseases affecting the macula are: Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetic eye disease refers to a range of diseases, the most common being diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of preventable blindness in working aged Australians and is considered to be a significant health threat worldwide. Diabetic macular edema is the most common cause of vision loss in people with diabetic retinopathy. It frequently affects both eyes at the same time. Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss in Australians over 50, with 1.29 million people having some evidence of the disease[7]. Age-related macular degeneration causes progressive loss of central vision, leaving the peripheral or side vision intact. [1] ‘Awareness of macular disease’, study conducted by YouGov Galaxy, commissioned by Macular Disease Foundation Australia between 1 and 4 March, 2018, comprising 1,020 Australians aged 18 years and older. [2] https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/diabetes-in-australia [3] Guidelines for the management of diabetic retinopathy, NHMRC 2008 [4] S. Keel, J. Xie, J. Foreman, P. van Wijngaarden, H.R. Taylor, M. Dirani. The prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy in Australian Adults with Self-Reported Diabetes: The National Eye Health Survey. Ophthalmology, 124 (7) (2017), pp. 977-984. [5] ‘Eyes on the future - A clear outlook on age-related macular degeneration’. Report by Deloitte Access Economics & Macular Degeneration Foundation, 2011. 2018 prevalence estimates are derived from a straight-line extrapolation between 2015 and 2020 estimates in this report. [6] Guidelines for the Management of Diabetic Retinopathy. NHMRC 2008. [7] ‘Eyes on the future - A clear outlook on age-related macular degeneration’. Report by Deloitte Access Economics and Macular Degeneration Foundation, 2011. 2018 prevalence estimates are derived from a straight-line extrapolation between 2015 and 2020 estimates in this report. doctoroo® prepares to ease the pain of accessing codeine-medications 2018-01-30T00:11:19Z doctoroo-r-prepares-to-ease-the-pain-of-accessing-codeine-medications To ease the pain, unfamiliarity and inconvenience of travelling to a GP for a codeine script, the Australian doctoroo® team is currently preparing an app that allows you to conveniently see your own or the first available GP on any device, anytime, anywhere in Australia. What began as a simple telehealth solution to connect GP’s with busy, rural or immobile Aussies, has evolved over the past two years and will enable you to enter your pain symptoms and prescription requirements (including codeine) before a consultation, so the doctor can assess this before they have the video consultation with you. The app actually aligns with the goals of the TGA and RACGP by allowing doctors to diagnose patients and offer the best pain management for their situation. GP’s may suggest codeine or an alternative pain management strategy - which helps to curb codeine addiction and misuse. doctoroo® founder, Christian Nehme, a medical scientist and previous pharmacy assistant, has seen too often the experience of patients with pain medication and the inconvenience travelling to a GP can sometimes be. “Seeing the frustration of patients, especially with the recent rescheduling of codeine, truly drives us to deliver a solution that makes pain that much less uncomfortable to deal with” said Mr Nehme. As opposed to other online doctor services, doctoroo® enables you, and actually encourages you to invite and see your own GP on the online platform. This means that you can book a consultation with your own GP wherever you are, and get an opinion from a doctor that knows you and that you trust. This again aligns with the goal of the RACGP, which encourages patient-doctor relationships. "It certainly would be very reasonable to have a longer-term relationship with your doctor and see them on a regular basis, to review your medication needs and make sure you are otherwise well," said Dr Bastian Seidel, president of the RACGP. Regulation such as this requires time for the public to adjust to. This service makes it genuinely convenient for those who walk into a pharmacy and are not aware or forget about the requirement of a prescription for their codeine or other medication. From within the pharmacy, or in a nearby private space, the patient can see a GP and obtain the required script, without needing to waste time travelling to a GP or even potentially avoiding this altogether and not obtaining the required health care. The app is estimated to have waiting times of just 10-20 minutes during the day. In comparison, patients can wait hours to access a nearby GP and months to access a specialist pain program in clinics. You’ll also be able to obtain medical certificates, referral letters and second opinions for most health issues. The service will be a privately-billed service, with consultations starting from as little as $15 for a few minutes, and is based on each GP’s minutely rate. With over 1,000 patients already signed up to the prelaunch, the doctoroo® team is aiming to make the app publicly available in the coming months. Hemp legalisation set to boost business for one of Australia’s leading Hemp product suppliers 2017-11-10T01:37:54Z hemp-legalisation-set-to-boost-business-for-one-of-australias-leading-hemp-product-suppliers The family owned and operated Australian business, established in 2006, was founded by The Williams family, CEO Ron, Formulating Director Maria, as well as their daughter Lara and sons Lloyd and Craig, who have been waiting for over a decade for this legislation to pass. Lara Burton, co-founder and Head of Sales and Marketing says: “We are delighted this day has finally come. Although we have legally been able to sell our Hemp food products in overseas restaurants and retail channels for years, we can now supply restaurants, cafes and supermarkets in our own home country, which is a great result and a wonderful feeling.” Lariese Purely Hemp produces a range of products including Hemp Seed Oil, Hulled Hemp Seeds, Hemp Protein Powder (50% and 80%) all using Canadian Hemp which is recognised worldwide as the best in the world due to Canada’s optimal growing conditions and nutritious soil. The Hemp industry is currently worth over $US570 million (1) in the US and Canada alone. Managing Director, Lloyd Williams, firmly believes this week’s ruling will significantly increase sales and market share for Lariese Purely Hemp. The Williams family have been advocates for the benefits of Hemp for a considerable time and firmly believe that the ruling will greatly improve the health of Australians, due to the large number of health benefits contained within Hemp. The family from the oldest to the youngest all use their own Lariese Hemp in their daily lives, including pre-and post-natal. They won’t offer anything for sale unless they have conclusively tested it on themselves first. Hemp is not just a super food but more of a whole food, being highly nutritious with many health benefits. It is rich in healthy fats and essential fatty acids and is also a great source of protein and contains high amounts of vitamin E, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium, sulphur, calcium, iron and zinc. Hemp Seed Oil has been used as a food/ medicine in China for over 3000 years. Lloyd Williams continues; “As one of the largest suppliers of Hemp in Australia and overseas, we have researched and tested hemp and hemp products for over ten years. The reason we chose to invest, grow and import Canadian Hemp was because of its superior quality, proven established track record for the last 18 years, and reliability of supply to the whole of North America, Europe and Asia”. Lariese has positioned itself as a market leader in Bulk Hemp Supply to all major companies nationally and internationally. Lariese believes it has experienced continuous growth due to its core beliefs, vision and 100% transparency, whilst using high quality ingredients with complete traceability. Lariese Purely Hemp seed is of a proprietary species bred for quality and taste and its products are certified Non-GMO, Vegan, Gluten free and Kosher certified. The company is the only provider in Australia currently selling premium 80% Hemp Protein. The family believes in providing healthy food options that are produced with a focus on sustainability and the environment. Hemp is a sustainable food source that boasts many inherent nutritional benefits and can be cultivated without negative environmental impact. Lara continues: “Our growers don’t use any potentially harmful pesticides, in-crop herbicides, or GMOs, which guarantees our great tasting hemp foods and ensures sustainability of the environment. In fact, Hemp is highly pest, weed and drought resistant meaning there is no need for pesticides and herbicides and it also removes more CO2 from the air than trees do.” Lariese Purely Hemp products can be found in most health food stores, including Go Vita and Mr Vitamins as well as online through Nourished Life. More information can be found on www.lariesepurelyhemp.com.au For further information or to interview Lloyd or Lara from Lariese Purely Hemp, please contact: Emma Kirkaldy at Polkadot Communications on 0406 025 771 or emma@polkadotcommunications.com.au Sources: 1 https://www.thehia.org/HIAhemppressreleases/4010402 Background Information What is Hemp? Hemp foods are incredibly nutritious – rich in healthy fats and essential fatty acids. They are also a great source of protein and contain high amounts of vitamin E, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium, sulphur, calcium, iron and zinc. Hemp seeds contain over 30% fat. They are exceptionally rich in two essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3). They also contain gamma-linolenic acid, which has been linked with many health benefits. www.lariesepurelyhemp.com.au Hemp seeds are a great protein source, as more than 25% of their total calories are from high-quality protein. That is considerably more than similar foods like chia seeds and flaxseeds, which provide about 16–18%. Hemp seeds can be consumed raw, cooked or toasted and Hemp seed oil is a very healthy oil, and has been used as a food/medicine in China for at least 3,000 years. Hemp Seed Oil Hemp seed oil is a natural, whole food product that – depending on its form – can be used in a wide range of recipes, consumed on its own as a dietary supplement, applied topically as a moisturising oil, or even used in industrial settings. It is in high demand for its superior quality and consistency. Lariese Edible Hemp Seed oil is cold-pressed from the seeds of the Cannabis sativa plant, and contains the perfect ratio of Omega Fatty Acids as recommended by the World Health Organization — Omega 6 and Omega 3 in a ratio of 3:1. Just 15mls contains 94% of your daily requirement of Omegas 3, 6 and 9 and boasts an EFA content of 80%. These fatty acids are fundamental to maintaining good health and effective functioning of the immune system and brain. As our brain needs a constant supply of Essential Fatty Acids (EFA) that the body cannot produce, Hemp Seed oil is just the fuel that our brain needs to stay healthy and function effectively. Hulled Hemp Seeds Raw Hulled Hemp Seeds are the most nutritious seeds found in nature and are a complete protein. Containing more digestible protein than any other food. Lariese Raw Hulled Hemp Seeds are a healthy and rich source of protein, particularly for vegans and vegetarians. This is true even for those unable to tolerate nuts, gluten, lactose or sugar, as there are no known allergies to hemp foods. Hemp Seeds are suitable for everyone, including expectant Mums as they contain naturally occurring nutrients essential to the brain, bone and nervous system development of a growing foetus, including Folate (Vitamin B9) and Vitamin B6. With a mild nutty flavour similar to pine nuts, Raw Hulled Hemp Seeds can be made into milk and used as a milk substitute for anything made from dairy, including butter, cheese and ice cream, as Hemp is free from estrogen mimickers and trypsin inhibitors. Toasted Hemp Seeds Whole unshelled Canadian edible hemp seeds are carefully roasted in our Canadian custom-built toasters to provide the best flavour. They are lactose intolerant free and gluten free and can be snacked on or used as an ingredient in baking, granolas, bars or snack manufacturing to provide the nutritional benefits of hemp and that extra crunch and toasted nutty flavour. Hemp Protein - 50% The nutritional profile of Hemp Protein Powder shows it contains all the essential fatty acids, amino acids, vitamins and minerals needed for good health. It stands alone as the only balanced, natural source of nutrition needed to assist with muscle building and repair, weight loss and fitness improvement, and muscle recovery. It is a complete food. Alkaline, and with an RNA genome very similar to human DNA, superfine Lariese Hemp Protein Powder is easy to digest and highly bioavailable. With 95% protein digestibility, it is easily metabolised into the system. Hemp Protein - 80% Our 80% Premium Hemp Protein Powder contains all the essential fatty acids, amino acids, vitamins and minerals needed for good health. It stands alone as the only balanced, natural source of nutrition needed to assist with muscle building and repair, weight loss and fitness improvement, and muscle recovery. It is a complete food. Alkaline, and with an RNA genome very similar to human DNA, superfine Lariese Hemp Protein Powder is easy to digest and highly bioavailable. With 95% protein digestibility, it is easily metabolised into the system. Breaking News - ASX Listed G Medical Signs Binding MOU for US $67.5M for China Distribution 2017-07-27T00:24:14Z breaking-news-asx-listed-g-medical-signs-binding-mou-for-us-67-5m-for-china-distribution ASX Announcement 27 July 2017 G MEDICAL SIGNS BINDING MOU FOR CHINA DISTRIBUTION VALUED AT US$67.5M •Binding MOU signed with Shandong Boletong Information S&T Co. Ltd. •Agreed terms include call centre cooperation and a minimum purchase order of Smartphone Prizmaunits within the first year. •Medical and ancillary support via Nurse and Physician staffed call centres and ‘Cloud’ services. Mobile health and e-health company G Medical Innovations Holdings Ltd (“G Medical” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce it has executed a Binding Memorandum of Understanding (“Agreement”) between its subsidiary G Medical Innovations Asia Limited and Shandong Boletong Information S&T Co. Ltd. (“Boletong”), for the distribution of G Medical’s products and for call centre and ‘Cloud’ services in the People’s Republic of China. G Medical Smartphone Prizma Purchase Order Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement, Boletong has agreed to purchase a minimum quantity of units within the 1st Year of the G Medical Smartphone Prizma, and to provide associated support services for a minimum period of 60 months. Boletong will pay a pre-determined price for each unit, with the value of the agreement based on the minimum commitments being no less than US$67,500,000. The obligation to acquire the units commences on the granting of the CFDA certification to G Medical, which is currently in process. Support Services 1) Medical Services: Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement, Boletong and G Medical will set up a medical call centreproviding support services from 50-60 Nurses and 3-5 General Practising Physicians. Boletong will be responsible for the recruitment of the Nurses and General Practising Physicians, andthe establishment of the call centre. 2) ‘Cloud’ Subscription and Support Services: Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement, Boletong and/or G Medical will provide; a) Automated Cloud algorithm interpretation services, for biomedical signals 20170727_GMV - Binding MOU for China Distribution Page 2 of 3 b )Level 1 services including, Live and/or automated end-user technical support c) Level 2 services including, hardware (device) support, replacement/repairs Marketing and advertising G Medical agreed to contribute an immaterial portion of the per unit price as marketing and investment for Boletong's promotion of the products and services in China, with such payments to be set-off against payment of the purchase orders by Boletong. Non-competition Boletong and its associations are subject to non-competition restraints for the period of the Agreement, and ending five years after its termination (unless G Medical is found by a Court to have breached the Agreement). These non-competition restraints extend to competing with the products or services of G Medical. G Medical CEO Dr. Yacov Geva, commented: “I am extremely pleased to announce yet another significant relationship for G Medical within the ever-growing and lucrative Chinese territory. To have further increased our purchase commitment for our G Medical Smartphone Prizma devices, over and above our existing agreements, is an exceptional outcome with a key partner in Boletong. This adds further to our robust, multi-year revenue stream for the Company, particularly within the first year of a CFDA approval being granted”. “I have met with the executives of Boletong, and whilst in China have visited their facilities and operations. Boletong operates in 16+ provinces and works with the National Public Health care system and acts as a distributor of medical services for the government. Boletong is currently working with several large healthcare organisations such as Wanda, a medical company which is positioned in the top three in their area, and along with telecom carriers such as China Telecom. Boletong is also supported through investment from a large and reputable group in Beijing. Our team, has invested more than 3 months in bringing this MOU to fruition, during which time we were able to satisfy ourselves as to Boletong's strong financial position, their key government partnerships in place, and the ability to deliver all aspects under our agreement.” “This relationship is a significant strategic partnership, allowing the roll out the Company’s medical and ancillary support services within the Chinese territory, for both our professional call centre and Cloud based systems”. Ends Corporate Advisors Otsana Capital 108 Outram Street West Perth WA 6005 Telephone: +61 8 9486 7244 www.otsana.com About Shandong Boletong Information S&T Co., Ltd Shandong Boletong Information S&T Co., Ltd. (Boletong) is a hi-tech medical and healthcare company invested by Beijing Honghui Group which has businesses in medicine, investment, drug store automation system and new energy areas, based in China. Boletong focuses on the production and sales of medical devices, membership healthcare management systems and R&D and applications for the National Basic Public Healthcare Project Solution. Boletong is currently one of the top 16 service providers for the national public healthcare system. Boletong is located in Jinan Hi-tech Technology Development Area, Shandong province. Boletong’s website is www.sdboletong.com About G Medical Innovations G Medical (ASX:GMV) was founded in August 2014, aiming to be at the forefront of the digital health revolution, developing the next generation of mobile health (mHealth) technologies. The Company brings forth the experience and expertise of its Board to deliver best-in-class solutions to address this global opportunity. The Company specialises in innovative next generation mobile and e-health solutions and services using its suite of devices and software solutions with a view to driving multiple and recurring revenue streams, across numerous verticals and territories. For more information on G Medical, please visit www.gmedinnovations.com