The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-05-14T00:55:48Z Expert-led weaner management roadshow tours Tasmania on first leg of nationwide event 2019-05-14T00:55:48Z expert-led-weaner-management-roadshow-tours-tasmania-on-first-leg-of-nationwide-event Two industry experts will shortly be hosting a Virbac Australia Cydectin Long Acting Weaner Management Roadshow at venues across Tasmania, as they present invaluable information to farmers on weaner management best practice fluke and worm control. Dr Matthew Ball (Beacon Veterinary Clinic owner and Livestock Technical Services Manager at Virbac Animal Health) and Dr Craig Dwyer, (Clinical Lead for Apiam Animal Health Group) will be touring the country on the first leg of what’s set to be a nationwide tour of Australia. As Dr Dwyer explains, weaning is a time of increased stress for young animals, due to a range of factors. “Whether from the stress of being separated from their mothers, the loss of milk in their diet or close confinement with other animals in the yard, these factors can take their toll, making calves more susceptible to both infectious and non-infectious diseases.” The recent change of season can also bring increased rainfall, which heightens the chance of an animal being infected with internal parasites like worms and liver fluke, causing a loss of condition, scours and anaemia in weaners up to 24 months of age. Dr Dwyer is convinced that “a good animal health program is the best form of defence once weaners are in the yard, because it gives them the best possible chance for optimal health and wellbeing as they grow.” Together, the veterinarians will take a practical look at various aspects of weaner health and wellbeing, with a particular focus on the best types and compositions of drench, fluke and worm products. Dr Ball explains that “it can be challenging to make sense of which drench is best suited to weaners. Which drenches are ‘knock-downs’ and which protect for longer? Do weaners need the same drench as cows? Which fluke and worm products are best for productivity? Which chemicals are safe for dung beetles? How do you combine different products into a program? What’s the best way to manage or prevent fluke and worm drench resistance? We’ll answer all these questions and more during the course of our presentations.” For Virbac Australia Tasmania Sales Manager Rob Youl, the roadshow is a great opportunity to learn from leaders in their field. “The presentations from Dr Dwyer and Dr Ball will provide attendees with practical information that can be applied directly on their farm. This promises to be a unique experience for beef and dairy producers, as they learn the latest and most effective weaner management programs for improved cattle health.” Interested producers are invited to contact Virbac representative Rob Youl on 0412 742 307, or email rob.youl@virbac.com.au for more information on how to attend. Tasmania roadshow itinerary: Date Location Time 21 May 2019 Agritas Conference Centre, Smithton 12pm Lunch available. 22 May 2019 The Boomerang, Currie King Island 12pm Lunch available. About the speakers Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 18 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Dr Craig Dwyer Former President of Australian Cattle Vets and Veterinarian, Dr Craig Dwyer graduated from Queensland University in 1998. After graduation he worked in dairy practice in Smithton Tasmania before continuing his career in England and Wales. Craig then returned to Smithton Veterinary Service where he became a partner in the practice. This practice is now part of the Apiam Animal Health group and Craig acts as Clinic Lead for the Tasmanian practices. Craig has completed the Sydney University postgraduate course in ruminant nutrition and in 2007 passed his membership exams in ruminant animal nutrition. Craig’s veterinary interests include cattle reproduction, bull fertility, nutrition and production. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Matthew Ball, Livestock Technical Services Manager at Virbac Australia Dr Craig Dwyer, Clinical Lead for Apiam Animal Health Group Virbac Australia to present a series of cattle health sessions at this year’s Gympie Show 2019-05-13T00:30:48Z virbac-australia-to-present-a-series-of-cattle-health-sessions-at-this-years-gympie-show The ever-popular Gympie Show is back – and this year, animal health company Virbac Australia will be part of the line-up as they present a series of cattle health sessions designed to support producers with tips and advice on improving animal productivity and profitability. With cattle ticks in the Gympie region being especially problematic for young weaner cattle, Virbac Australia is running four presentations to help farmers improve the immunity and health of young weaner cattle, as well as identify the best broad spectrum long-acting drench and trace mineral supplements to support them at this critical time in their development. Delivered by Victor Moffroid, Area Sales Manager for the Gympie region, he’ll also be demonstrating the correct application method for injectable long-acting drenches and injectable trace mineral supplements. Events run at the Showground Cattle Yards on Thursday May 16th at 12.00pm and 4.00pm, and Friday 17th May at 10:30am and 2:30pm. They’re free to attend, and interested media and event visitors are invited to turn up and register on the day. Everyone that registers will go into the draw to win a 200ml pack of Cydectin Long Acting Injection for Cattle, with the winner drawn on Friday 17th May. This year’s Gympie Show promises to offer an amazing experience for all, and Virbac Australia is looking forward to being part of what has over the years become a major highlight of the regions agricultural calendar. To find out more about Virbac Australia, please visit https://au.virbac.com/ Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Victor Moffroid, Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager Beef producer administering Cydectin LA Veterinarian warns of post-flooding botulism risk for northern QLD 2019-05-09T04:27:14Z veterinarian-warns-of-post-flooding-botulism-risk-for-northern-qld In the wake of Queensland’s recent flooding, a leading vet has flagged the heightened risk of botulism for northern cattle producers. Botulism thrives in decaying animal and plant matter. With producers having faced the loss of many cattle, there’s likely to be an increased presence of the lethal toxin, both now and for many years to come, says Dr Matt Ball, Veterinarian and Technical Services Manager at Virbac Australia. The number of animal carcasses made conditions ideal for the proliferation of the disease. Latest estimates were half a million cattle dead, and with many cattle in recovery mode, survivors will be driven to chew bones to obtain vital nutrients. The number one method to combat this problem is an effective vaccination program. Dr Ball has spent three years researching the immune response of northern Australian cattle to botulism. His research confirmed the challenges of successfully vaccinating cattle in northern Australia due to nutritional and other factors, with the choice of vaccine found to have a major affect on protection levels. Recent field research conducted by Virbac and the Department of Primary Industry & Resources has shown that even after vaccination, only 70-80% of cattle may be protected. A range of issues can affect success – from missed mustering in often challenging environments to difficulty in handling animal health products, as well as compromised immunity on vaccination day. As Dr Ball explains, now that the risk is so much higher, a booster will pick up the 20% of animals that may still be vulnerable. It’s also important to remember that botulism is a ‘challenge-based’ disease – so in much the same way as shatterproof glass can still be broken by a big enough rock, a previously vaccinated animal can still die if given a high enough dose of the toxin. “Even if you’ve vaccinated prior to the floods, you’ll likely want to talk to an animal health advisor about the possibility of a booster, as this will give the highest possible level of antibodies to meet the increased levels of toxins currently present,” says Dr Ball. There are differences in the available botulism vaccines in Australia. SingVac, available as a One Year or Three Year product and containing an innovative ‘water in oil in water’ formulation, was found in local research to be capable of producing a higher level of antibodies when compared to other vaccines on the market. It is an ideal vaccine to protect cattle through this high-risk period. In the face of the widespread risk caused by the huge number of livestock mortalities in the recent floods, vaccination is the best form of defense to help minimise the threat from this deadly disease. A botulism management plan is vital for successful post-flood farm recovery. Farmers are invited to find out more about SingVac at au.virbac.com Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Matt Ball, Veterinarian and Technical Services Manager at Virbac Australia Northern QLD Brahman Cattle Virbac Multimin Performance Ready Challenge winner announced! 2019-05-06T02:57:02Z virbac-multimin-performance-ready-challenge-winner-announced After 12 intensive months of in-depth trace mineral trials conducted by seven farmers around Australia and their mentors, the results of the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge winner’s vote are finally in. With close to 5,000 public votes cast for the three finalists, and 50% of the votes going to the overall winner, challenge organiser Virbac Australia are thrilled to announce the 2019 Multimin Challenger Queen as Victorian farmer Renee Murfett from Framlingham. Virbac Australia’s Livestock Nutrition Product Manager Jerry Liu described the level of public support for the challenge as “truly amazing. This competition has really captured the hearts and minds of our farming communities, and we’re incredibly proud of Renee and her mentor Dr Susan Swaney for all the hard work and dedication they’ve put into this trial over the last year.” Renee’s goal was clear from word go. “I wanted to use Multimin to increase the immunity, health and productivity of our calves,” she explains. With five heifers previously lost due to broken legs, all indications were that her stock was suffering from suboptimal levels of trace minerals. “The Multimin Challenge was a great opportunity to see the impact of trace mineral supplementation on our livestock health and performance,” says Renee. With the trial itself focusing on 105 treated animals and 105 untreated animals, calves were weighed at birth and even numbered tags were given a shot of Multimin injection, with odd numbered tags left untreated as a control mob. “Our first observation was that the treated calves had a very shiny coat compared to the untreated animals,” Renee explains. “With skin being the first line of defense, animals with healthy coats have higher immunity to disease, and they can better fight off infections – and that leads to improved future productivity.” The next obvious difference was when calves were transitioned onto hard feed. “Many untreated animals developed scouring and went off their feed for 2-3 days,” Renee reports. “However, none of the Multimin-treated animals developed scours, and continued to feed well. This really impressed me, because scouring calves are very hard work and very time-consuming – so to be able to avoid that problem is a major bonus.” “This trial has proved the critical roles trace elements play in immunity and animal health, and it’s really showed how Multimin can enhance immunity. There’s no doubt that optimisation of trace minerals at high demand times can improve animal health and productivity,” concludes Renee. “It’s been a fascinating12 month trial, and I’m over the moon to hear that I’ve won the competition.” As part of her prize, Virbac Australia will be sending Renee on an overseas study tour tailored to her farming system, valued at more than $20,000. She’ll be jetting off on an overseas study tour to learn more about best-practice dairy farming. “It’s going to be life-changing,” says Renee. “To have this opportunity to study overseas dairy farming practices and gain new inspiration to help improve our business is incredible. I feel really excited for what’s to come.” For Jerry, the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge has been a unique way for the industry to encourage livestock producers to get involved and learn more about this important aspect of animal health and nutrition. “The program has received an incredible amount of support from the public, and also from livestock experts all over Australia. The results of this challenge will really help us to continue pioneering new research that improves product efficacy and benefits our local producers.” Find out more about Multimin, Virbac Australia’s Performance Ready Challenge and Challenger Queen Renee Murfett at www.multiminchallenge.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo caption: Multimin Performance Ready Challenge Winner Renee Murfett Renee Murfett with mentor Dr Susan Swaney Unhappy Mothers' Days 2019-05-02T19:03:56Z unhappy-mothers-days Dear Editor, On Mother’s Day, thousands of mothers will be separated from their babies. In the dairy industry, newborn calves are taken away from their mothers shortly after birth so that the milk meant for them can be bought and consumed by humans. Being separated causes grief and anguish to both mother and calf. Distraught mother cows often cry out for their lost babies for days. Male calves are either sent for slaughter or killed on the farm by being shot or smashed through the skull with a hammer. And it's not just mother cows. PETA exposés of the wool industry in Australia – the world’s largest exporter of wool – show mother sheep watching and frantically calling out as workers cut chunks of flesh off their lambs' hindquarters with shears, in a crude procedure known as "mulesing", which is carried out in an attempt to address issues caused by breeding them to produce excessive amounts of wool. In puppy mills, female dogs are treated like puppy-producing machines. Puppies are abruptly taken away from their mothers, and both mother and baby can suffer malnutrition, exposure, and a lack of adequate veterinary care. Mothers are kept in cramped cages and hutches and bred over and over again until they can no longer produce puppies. Such abuse is rampant across industries that exploit animals and perpetuate speciesism – the view that the lives and experiences of other animals don't matter simply because they’re not human. Please, spare a thought for these animals as you're celebrating Mother’s Day. Our consumer choices have the power to make it happy or full of misery for other mothers. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Consultant, PETA Australia PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002 (+618) 8556-5828 mimib@peta.org.au New Media App Launches To Kill Off The Press Release 2019-04-30T04:15:39Z new-media-app-launches-to-kill-off-the-press-release A new technology platform has launches tomorrow made just for you. This tech platform called Story Match® will change the way that you receive your story pitches. No more emails, no more press releases and no more hassling PRs (I promise not to be one of those…) First, watch this! In 1.5 minutes it will explain it all to you… Story Match® is a two sided market place App and Desktop platform that allows brands to pitch story ideas to journalists, at the same time allowing journalists to select only what topics of stories they want to receive. Journalists, like you, set up their profile using 6 simple steps. You can select from up to 50 industry tags (food, finance, lifestyle, tech, etc etc) and can localise by State and Territories. If there’s a match on industry tags then you see the pitch. Using swiping technology you can scroll through stories, swipe left if you don’t like the story or right if you do. If you swipe right, it will open an immediate and private chat between you and the person who posted the pitch. The best bit…. The pitches have limitations – so brands can only upload selected images, a headline and up to 500 characters to bring their pitch to life. They then select which industry tag their story is relevant to, and localise it. So now you don’t need to read any more press releases or receive any more pitches that you’re not interested in. Story Match® was developed to improve efficiencies in the media industry, and allow all brands, no matter how big or small the opportunity to get their brand noticed. The tech platform has been developed by Founder and Director of Polkadot Communications Dionne Taylor – who has worked both as a journalist and a PR for the last 15 years. Dionne is available for an interview to chat about this new and exciting platform, built just for YOU! If interested in speaking with Dionne, please get in touch. Under two weeks left to vote for the Virbac Multimin Performance Ready Challenge winner 2019-04-22T22:43:34Z under-two-weeks-left-to-vote-for-the-virbac-multimin-performance-ready-challenge-winner There are just a couple of weeks to go to cast your vote before one Australian livestock producer is crowned the Multimin Performance Ready Challenger King or Queen for 2019. Launched by animal health company Virbac Australia, the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge has been running for the past 12 months. The program’s top three challengers, Don McConnel (QLD), Renee Murfett (VIC) and Ryan Willing (WA) are all in the running to win the study trip of a lifetime tailored to their farming system, valued at more than $20,000 ­– and with thousands of votes already cast by the public, the voting is currently neck and neck. Challenger Don says Multimin has already helped his heifers’ immunity and fertility during what is a very hard stage of their lives, giving them the lift in production they were looking for. “We’ve learnt some really invaluable information about our herd’s health and the benefits of Multimin if given at high demand moments pre-joining, and in conjunction with vaccines to help boost the animals’ immune system,” he says. For Renee, the challenge has been a great opportunity to see the impact of the trace mineral injections on livestock health and performance. “The trial confirmed the critical roles that trace minerals play in immunity and animal health and shows us that immunity can be enhanced by use of Multimin. There’s no doubt that optimisation of trace minerals at high demand time points can provide improved animal health and productivity,” she says. Ryan reports that before starting using Multimin “my yearlings used to look brown and shaggy by the end of winter – but they were keeping their shiny black coats, which is the first sign of good health. Treatment with Multimin four weeks from joining lifted the average conception rate from 85% to 92% over a 9-week joining period. I also saw weight gains in my steers by using a combination of Multimin and Cydectin Long Acting Injection, with results showing a 1 kg/day average from weaning to spring sale,” says Ryan. For all three challengers, the opportunity to learn from the overseas study tour prize awarded to the overall winner will be instrumental in helping them to improve productivity. "As young farmers, an overseas study tour would be incredibly beneficial for learning and implementing new practices, ensuring our farm’s growth and sustainability into the future," says Ryan. Renee agrees, saying that it would be “life-changing to see overseas dairy farming practices, and the opportunity would bring fresh inspiration and ideas to help improve our business.” Meanwhile, for Don the prize would be “an ideal opportunity to learn about new technologies and techniques in practice, and see how we could bring that home to help us lift production and efficiency.” Data collected from the challenge will also assist Virbac with future research projects aiming to improve product efficacy. As Virbac Australia’s Livestock Nutrition Marketing Manager Jerry Liu explains, “nutritional science is dynamic and always evolving – and as the market leader, it’s important for us to capture data through trials with real beef, dairy and sheep producers, so we can continue to pioneer new research that benefits our local producers.” There’s still time to vote for your favourite challenger and send them on an overseas study tour. Voting closes at midnight on May 5, so cast your vote for the Multimin King or Queen of 2019 now at www.multiminchallenge.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: VIC Multimin Performance Ready Challenger Renee Murfett WA Multimin Performance Ready Challenger Ryan Willing with Mentor Dr Enoch Bergman QLD Multimin Performance Ready Challenger Don McConnel It’s time to vote for the Virbac Multimin Performance Ready Challenge winner 2019-03-31T21:57:30Z its-time-to-vote-for-the-virbac-multimin-performance-ready-challenge-winner-2 Animal health company Virbac Australia has announced its top three finalists in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge – and with just 30 days to go before one lucky livestock producer is crowned the Multimin Challenger King or Queen, now’s the time to cast your vote. Over the past 12 months, seven livestock producers have been competing in the 12-month program, designed to test the benefits of Multimin, an injection used to top up trace minerals in sheep and cattle prior to high demand periods. Led by Virbac Australia, the program has seen improvements in everything from pregnancy-test rates to conception rates and immune function, all delivering a vital boost to producer productivity. Virbac’s top three challengers, Don McConnel (QLD), Renee Murfett (VIC) and Ryan Willing (WA) are all in the running to win an overseas study tour tailored to their farming system, and free Multimin for a year, a total prize value of more than $20,000. Don operates “Mt Brisbane”, a 4,500 hectare breeding and fattening operation in the Brisbane Valley, where he runs purebred Droughtmaster cattle and a Droughtmaster stud operation. Facing trace mineral issues particularly with copper and selenium, Don has sought to use Multimin to increase fertility, conception and productivity. Results showed that animals treated with Multimin at the same time as their 7 in 1 vaccination had higher leptospirosis antibody titres and also looked in noticeably better condition. Renee runs two dairy farms in Framlingham, Victoria with her husband Alister, comprising a 145 hectare home farm, “Springlea”, which has 220 Frisian x Red Dairy milking cows, and a second 183 hectare farm, “Merton Park”, with 250 Frisian x Red Dairy cows. Renee’s goal has been to increase the immunity, health and productivity of their livestock, and she describes how she saw significant differences as early as the first 12 weeks. “The treated calves didn’t seem to suffer from the usual gastric signs that the untreated herd had at the time of weaning. Multimin helped with the adjustment to weaner rations, and they went straight on to the new diet without any issues.” Ryan Willing and his wife Elisha run “Carnigup”, a 1,050-hectare property that’s home to a 300 breeder self-replacing herd east of Esperance, WA. Facing issues with copper and selenium that were impacting the fertility, weight gain and overall health of their herd, their goal has been to increase fertility, conception rates and productivity. When pregnancy-tested last October, Ryan saw above 90% conception in both groups, with the Multimin-treated animals slightly ahead. “Multimin has proven its worth in this instance and reinforced the importance of investing for the future,” says Ryan. WA challenge mentor Dr Enoch Bergman explained that “it’s been great to be involved in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge and share our knowledge of the role trace minerals can play, to see how it performs with their livestock. We’ve seen some really great results.” Voting lines for each of the finalists have been open since 8am on 1st April, and the public can vote for their favourite challenger until midnight on 5th May 2019. Virbac Australia’s Livestock Nutrition Product Manager Jerry Liu gave his reaction to the news, saying that “we’re excited to let the public decide on who should win, in what is an entirely unconventional, interactive way. We’d love to know who your favourite Multimin challenger has been, so please make your vote count.” So who will become the Multimin Challenger King or Queen on 6 May 2019? That’s for you to decide. Check out the top three challengers and their results at www.multiminchallenge.com and cast your vote to award one worthy winner the Multimin Ultimate Challenger title and the trip of a lifetime. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Top 3 Multimin Performance Ready Challenger finalists (Don, Renee, Ryan) WA Multimin Challenger Elisha & Ryan Willing with mentor Dr Enoch Bergman It’s time to vote for the Virbac Multimin Performance Ready Challenge winner 2019-03-31T21:53:43Z its-time-to-vote-for-the-virbac-multimin-performance-ready-challenge-winner-1 Animal health company Virbac Australia has announced its top three finalists in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge – and with just 30 days to go before one lucky livestock producer is crowned the Multimin Challenger King or Queen, now’s the time to cast your vote. Over the past 12 months, seven livestock producers have been competing in the 12-month program, designed to test the benefits of Multimin, an injection used to top up trace minerals in sheep and cattle prior to high demand periods. Led by Virbac Australia, the program has seen improvements in everything from pregnancy-test rates to conception rates and immune function, all delivering a vital boost to producer productivity. Virbac’s top three challengers, Don McConnel (QLD), Renee Murfett (VIC) and Ryan Willing (WA) are all in the running to win an overseas study tour tailored to their farming system, and free Multimin for a year, a total prize value of more than $20,000. Don operates “Mt Brisbane”, a 4,500 hectare breeding and fattening operation in the Brisbane Valley, where he runs purebred Droughtmaster cattle and a Droughtmaster stud operation. Facing trace mineral issues particularly with copper and selenium, Don has sought to use Multimin to increase fertility, conception and productivity. Results showed that animals treated with Multimin at the same time as their 7 in 1 vaccination had higher leptospirosis antibody titres and also looked in noticeably better condition. Renee runs two dairy farms in Framlingham, Victoria with her husband Alister, comprising a 145 hectare home farm, “Springlea”, which has 220 Frisian x Red Dairy milking cows, and a second 183 hectare farm, “Merton Park”, with 250 Frisian x Red Dairy cows. Renee’s goal has been to increase the immunity, health and productivity of their livestock, and she describes how she saw significant differences as early as the first 12 weeks. “The treated calves didn’t seem to suffer from the usual gastric signs that the untreated herd had at the time of weaning. Multimin helped with the adjustment to weaner rations, and they went straight on to the new diet without any issues.” Ryan Willing and his wife Elisha run “Carnigup”, a 1,050-hectare property that’s home to a 300 breeder self-replacing herd east of Esperance, WA. Facing issues with copper and selenium that were impacting the fertility, weight gain and overall health of their herd, their goal has been to increase fertility, conception rates and productivity. When pregnancy-tested last October, Ryan saw above 90% conception in both groups, with the Multimin-treated animals slightly ahead. “Multimin has proven its worth in this instance and reinforced the importance of investing for the future,” says Ryan. WA challenge mentor Dr Enoch Bergman explained that “it’s been great to be involved in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge and share our knowledge of the role trace minerals can play, to see how it performs with their livestock. We’ve seen some really great results.” Voting lines for each of the finalists have been open since 8am on 1st April, and the public can vote for their favourite challenger until midnight on 5th May 2019. Virbac Australia’s Livestock Nutrition Product Manager Jerry Liu gave his reaction to the news, saying that “we’re excited to let the public decide on who should win, in what is an entirely unconventional, interactive way. We’d love to know who your favourite Multimin challenger has been, so please make your vote count.” So who will become the Multimin Challenger King or Queen on 6 May 2019? That’s for you to decide. Check out the top three challengers and their results at www.multiminchallenge.com and cast your vote to award one worthy winner the Multimin Ultimate Challenger title and the trip of a lifetime. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Top 3 Multimin Performance Ready Challenger finalists (Don, Renee, Ryan) WA Multimin Challenger Elisha & Ryan Willing with mentor Dr Enoch Bergman Industry expert-led Liver Fluke roadshow concludes following NSW tour 2019-03-24T22:52:22Z industry-expert-led-liver-fluke-roadshow-concludes-following-nsw-tour Two industry experts have recently wrapped up a roadshow across NSW designed to highlight the importance of controlling two-week old fluke in sheep, beef and dairy production and the emerging problem of chemical resistance. Ms Jane Kelley, PhD Candidate, Department of Animal, Plant and Soil Sciences and Dr Matthew Ball, Technical Services Veterinarian at Virbac Animal Health toured regional NSW towns earlier this month to share their expertise and help cattle producers address liver fluke disease among their cattle. The roadshow covered everything from the latest global and local findings to new testing methods, how to build a FlukeKill program and how to integrate a fluke treatment with best-practice worm treatment – making it an invaluable forum for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of control methods for optimal cattle production. Beef and sheep producer Tony Overton was one of the farmers who attended the Walcha seminar. “We’ve always been very vigilant when it comes to these issues in sheep, but we’ve never looked at it being a major issue for cattle, even though we knew it was coming,” he said. “This seminar highlighted the three different application methods, with good explanations of the pros and cons of each, which was of great value to me. I found it very helpful to learn the science behind the best methods for controlling parasites and fluke in our cattle.” Beef producer Bill Mitchell said he attended the Armidale seminar because “we know we have issues with fluke and realise we should be doing more about it. It was great to hear from the experts and get reacquainted with the whole fluke issue – and it was also useful to make contact with the best people to help us. We already use Virbac products, and while our resellers often guide us with how and when to use the products, it’s good to hear a wider range of information on the topic. We will be seeking Virbac’s help as we implement a fixed program to help us run the farm more efficiently.” Virbac Australia’s Fluke Product Manager David Yang described the roadshow as a great success. “With autumn heralding the start of liver fluke season, now’s a critical time for graziers to address the disease among their cattle. Jane and Matthew have presented some really invaluable information to Australia’s industry professionals and cattle producers, and this has been a unique opportunity to learn the latest in fluke management from the experts. We hope it’s helped to inform Australian farmers on the best practices to safeguard their livestock and minimise the impact of this challenging disease.” Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Virbac Australia Fluke Roadshow Seminar Virbac Australia Representatives (Emma Dodd, David Yang, Matthew Ball, Jane Kelley) Trace mineral trial continues to deliver compelling data to support its efficacy 2019-02-27T07:16:22Z trace-mineral-trial-continues-to-deliver-compelling-data-to-support-its-efficacy Seven livestock producers are currently competing in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, designed to test the livestock benefits of Multimin, an injection used to top up trace minerals in sheep and cattle prior to high demand periods. Led by animal health company Virbac Australia, the 12-month program will highlight the effects of the mineral injection, delivering real results by real producers. The challengers are competing to be crowned the Multimin Challenger King or Queen – and it will be the public who will ultimately decide the winner when voting opens online in April. The winner will be announced in May 2019 and awarded an ‘experience of lifetime’ prize, specifically tailored to their farming system. The latest challenger to reveal their results is Victorian challenger Renee Murfett, who together with husband Alister operates two dairy farms in Framlingham, Victoria. Their 145-hectare “Springlea” property has 220 Friesian Red Dairy milking cows, while their second 183-hectare farm “Merton Park” has 250 Friesian Red Dairy cows. Renee’s goal has been to increase the immunity, health and productivity of her calves. With five heifers previously lost due to broken legs, Renee’s stock were believed to have suboptimal levels of trace minerals – making Multimin’s animal health program a great opportunity to see the impact of the trace mineral supplement on livestock health and performance. As part of the trial, 210 animals (105 treated and 105 untreated ‘control’ animals) were used to assess improvements in immunity, indicated by a reduction in disease and with the potential for improved growth. The treated group were given Multimin 4 in 1 trace mineral injection for cattle at 1mL/ 50kg at birth, and again at weaning (around 12 weeks of age), and data was collected relating to incidence of scours or disease, presence of illness or death, growth rate and general health. Renee observed some marked differences between the two groups at key stages of development. “The first signs appeared very early on,” she reports. “At just four days of age, we found that only the non-treated calves developed scours. Then by day seven, we began to see visual improvements in the Multimin-treated calves, which had darker, shinier coats compared to the non-treated animals.” Renee’s mentor Dr Susan Swaney explains the significance of that finding. “The coat is an indicator of how well the skin and other physical barriers are. These being the first line of defence, animals with healthy skin and mucous membranes are less likely to be invaded by disease,” she explains. “Improved immune function means improved future productivity, and this type of program while calves are undergoing a growth phase and developing muscle, cartilage and bone will ensure they’re given the best possible start to life.” Renee also observed that when calves were transitioned onto hard feed, stock from both groups developed scouring – but while some of the control animals went off their feed for two to three days, the Multimin-treated animals continued to feed well. As Susan explains, “we know the importance of the trace minerals in Multimin in the development of all stages of the immune system. Optimisation of trace elements at critical time points can provide better disease protection and in some cases improved weight gains, to give young animals the best beginning at what is a critical time in development.” To find out more about how Multimin can improve your livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Farmers can also follow the trials at www.multiminchallenge.com - Ends - Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 / 02 6766 4513 Photo caption: Renee Murfett with mentor Dr Susan Swaney Renee’s Multimin treated calves Industry expert-led Liver Fluke Roadshow set to tour NSW 2019-02-25T06:50:21Z industry-expert-led-liver-fluke-roadshow-set-to-tour-nsw Autumn means liver fluke season, so right now is a critical time for graziers to address liver fluke disease among their cattle. Around six million cattle graze Australian pastures where liver fluke is endemic*, and although it’s been a dry summer, experts warn cattle producers not to become complacent in the lead up to Autumn and consider the best strategies to protect their livestock. Next week, two industry experts will kick-off a roadshow across NSW to highlight the importance of controlling two-week old fluke in beef and dairy production. Ms Jane Kelley, PhD Candidate, Department of Animal, Plant and Soil Sciences and Dr Matthew Ball, Veterinarian, Technical Services Veterinarian at Virbac Animal Health will tour regional NSW towns from March 4 - 13 to share their expertise. It’s being described as a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of control methods for optimal cattle production. Jane completed an Associate Degree in Environmental Horticulture at the University of Melbourne, a Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Science with Honours, at La Trobe University and is currently completing a PhD. Based at Melbourne’s Centre for AgriBioscience, her research focuses on the epidemiology and management of liver fluke parasites in cattle. Jane has been quantifying the prevalence of liver fluke and drug resistance on dairy farms in Victoria, and is now optimising liver fluke control strategies. “My aim is to increase the productivity and profitability of cattle industries by reducing the detrimental impacts liver fluke has on production, weight gain and fertility in Australian cattle,” she says. Matthew has 18 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles, with jobs in clinical practice, government and industry. He has undertaken post-graduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs. “We’ll be presenting nine seminars on the roadshow, which will cover the latest global and local findings, new testing methods, how to build a FlukeKill program and how to integrate a fluke treatment with best-practice worm treatment,” says Matthew. “We’re really looking forward to sharing our knowledge, and helping both producers and vets to take the necessary steps to safeguard livestock.” “We’re excited to be hosting Ms Kelley and Dr Ball,” says Virbac Australia’s Fluke Product Manager David Yang. “They’ll present some really invaluable information to Australia’s industry professionals and cattle producers, and this is a unique opportunity to learn the latest in fluke management from the experts.” Please note: this is an invitation-only event. Please contact your local Virbac Australia representative or your local Virbac merchandise store for more information on how to attend. Seminar itinerary: Date Location Time Monday, 4th March Glen Innes Services Club 6pm Dinner provided. Tuesday, 5th March Armidale Golf Club, Armidale 7am. Breakfast and refreshments provided. Wednesday, 6th March Walcha Veterinary Supplies, Walcha 7.30am. Breakfast and refreshments provided. Thursday, 7th March Hill & Crofts CRT, Blayney 8.30am. Breakfast provided. Thursday, 7th March Orange Duntryleague, Orange 6:30pm. Food and refreshments provided. Friday, 8th March Elders, Cowra 8am. Refreshments provided. Monday, 11th March Adelong Services & Citizens Club, Adelong 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Tuesday, 12th March The Services Club, Braidwood 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Wednesday, 13th March Bombala Golf Club, Bombala 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Ends * NSW Government Department of Primary Industries; March 2017, Primefact 446, fourth edition. Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Ms Jane Kelley Dr Matthew Ball That Steve Irwin Google doodle 2019-02-25T04:04:08Z that-steve-irwin-google-doodle Dear Editor, Steve Irwin was no saint, nor would he have claimed to be. He was a showbiz personality, acting the part of a "wildlife warrior" brilliantly, while in reality exploiting and harassing the animals he claimed to protect. Hauling animals to television studios or ambushing a crocodile with ropes, duct tape, and a camera crew — traumatising the animal and temping other people to approach wild animals themselves or, even worse, purchase one to keep as a "pet" — is neither education nor conservation. True wildlife experts, such as Jean-Michel Cousteau, frown upon the idea of hauling exotic animals around in an endless parade of shows and exhibits and disturbing animals in their natural habitats. Cousteau stated that Irwin would "interfere with nature, jump on animals, grab them, hold them … it goes very well on television. It sells, it appeals to a lot people, but I think it’s very misleading. You don’t touch nature, you just look at it." Zoos and wildlife shows are just that – show business. Leave that for Hollywood, and please don’t support any business where live animals are taken from their natural environment, showcased and exploited. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Consultant, PETA Australia PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002 (08) 8556-5828 mimib@peta.org.au Virbac Australia announces the winner of their latest Cydectin LA testimonial competition 2019-02-22T01:39:40Z virbac-australia-announces-the-winner-of-their-latest-cydectin-la-testimonial-competition-1 With internal parasite infestation being the single most important disease faced by Australia’s red meat producers, animal health company Virbac Australia recently decided to run a testimonial competition across social media to discover the impact of their parasite product Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle on farms around Australia. The product is known for its unbeatable potency and persistency, and it provides the longest protection available against a range of internal and external parasites, including worms – but rather than just take Virbac’s word for it, the manufacturer asked Cydectin LA users to tell their own stories on their Facebook page. Customers were asked to share how the product improved productivity and profitability, saved labour and helped heifers and weaners to reach optimal weight earlier. One entrant would be the lucky winner of a Leicht's Stockman Pro-Chute worth $7,000, while the store with the winning entrant would also receive a donation of $1,000 to go to a nominated local charity. In addition, everyone who entered won a free pack of Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle. Virbac Australia recently announced the overall winner as cattle grazier David Ross from Wollomombi, east of Armidale, NSW, and he was recently the delighted recipient of a brand new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute. David summarised his experience using Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle as follows: “We began using Cydectin LA in our weaners 4 years ago. We wean around 500 head in March every year and we immediately noticed the difference LA was making. We were no longer seeing any wormy cattle in mid-winter and the visual difference in our weaners with no tail present was a very obvious benefit. Since using LA we have been getting our replacement heifers to joining weights quicker, this product has been great for our business.” GrazAg Armidale was announced as the winning store, with Virbac Australia donating $1,000 to their chosen charity, BackTrack. The charity enables young people who have lost their way to reconnect with education and training, become work-ready and secure meaningful employment. The youth they work with are mostly rural males aged 12 to 19 who have multiple and complex challenges in education, health, justice, housing and employment. BackTrack helps these young people to get back on track by developing strong, happy and healthy foundations that result in positive life pathways and full participation in their communities, and Virbac Australia is proud to be able to contribute to this worthwhile cause. When it comes to a parasite management program, Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball says that Autumn is always a strategic time to control cattle parasites such as worms and ticks. “Numbers of parasites are often at a high level and a highly effective Autumn drench will not only remove the current parasites but reduce overall paddock contamination. An Autumn treatment with Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle will strategically reduce the risk from highly contaminated pastures and avoid the need for repeat drench treatments. Autumn use of Cydectin LA can often be timed to a pre-weaning or weaning time drench.” Matt continues, “Independent research has proven that single strategic use of Cydectin LA in growing stock will lead to much higher productivity than multiple short acting drenches. The vaccine is changing the approach to the control of worms and cattle ticks in Australia. Used strategically, the product can deliver improved productivity, animal welfare, labor efficiency and resistance management.” To find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA, farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Cydectin LA testimonial winner, David Ross with his new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball Virbac Australia announces the winner of their latest Cydectin LA testimonial competition 2019-02-22T00:44:21Z virbac-australia-announces-the-winner-of-their-latest-cydectin-la-testimonial-competition With internal parasite infestation being the single most important disease faced by Australia’s red meat producers, animal health company Virbac Australia recently decided to run a testimonial competition across social media to discover the impact of their parasite product Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle on farms around Australia. The product is known for its unbeatable potency and persistency, and it provides the longest protection available against a range of internal and external parasites, including worms – but rather than just take Virbac’s word for it, the manufacturer asked Cydectin LA users to tell their own stories on their Facebook page. Customers were asked to share how the product improved productivity and profitability, saved labour and helped heifers and weaners to reach optimal weight earlier. One entrant would be the lucky winner of a Leicht's Stockman Pro-Chute worth $7,000, while the store with the winning entrant would also receive a donation of $1,000 to go to a nominated local charity. In addition, everyone who entered won a free pack of Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle. Virbac Australia recently announced the overall winner as cattle grazier David Ross from Wollomombi, east of Armidale, NSW, and he was recently the delighted recipient of a brand new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute. David summarised his experience using Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle as follows: “We began using Cydectin LA in our weaners 4 years ago. We wean around 500 head in March every year and we immediately noticed the difference LA was making. We were no longer seeing any wormy cattle in mid-winter and the visual difference in our weaners with no tail present was a very obvious benefit. Since using LA we have been getting our replacement heifers to joining weights quicker, this product has been great for our business.” GrazAg Armidale was announced as the winning store, with Virbac Australia donating $1,000 to their chosen charity, BackTrack. The charity enables young people who have lost their way to reconnect with education and training, become work-ready and secure meaningful employment. The youth they work with are mostly rural males aged 12 to 19 who have multiple and complex challenges in education, health, justice, housing and employment. BackTrack helps these young people to get back on track by developing strong, happy and healthy foundations that result in positive life pathways and full participation in their communities, and Virbac Australia is proud to be able to contribute to this worthwhile cause. When it comes to a parasite management program, Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball says that Autumn is always a strategic time to control cattle parasites such as worms and ticks. “Numbers of parasites are often at a high level and a highly effective Autumn drench will not only remove the current parasites but reduce overall paddock contamination. An Autumn treatment with Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle will strategically reduce the risk from highly contaminated pastures and avoid the need for repeat drench treatments. Autumn use of Cydectin LA can often be timed to a pre-weaning or weaning time drench.” Matt continues, “Independent research has proven that single strategic use of Cydectin LA in growing stock will lead to much higher productivity than multiple short acting drenches. The vaccine is changing the approach to the control of worms and cattle ticks in Australia. Used strategically, the product can deliver improved productivity, animal welfare, labor efficiency and resistance management.” To find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA, farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Cydectin LA testimonial winner, David Ross with his new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball