The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-06-24T14:24:08Z Yulin dog-eating festival 2019-06-24T14:24:08Z yulin-dog-eating-festival Dear Editor, This week in Yulin, China, thousands of dogs — and even some cats — will be brutally slaughtered, and their flesh sold as food. The Yulin Dog Meat Festival is widely and angrily condemned. The thought of killing, cooking, and eating dogs is truly shocking and disgusting. But there’s no rational reason the thought of eating any other animal shouldn’t elicit the same revulsion. The idea that some species of animal deserve more moral consideration than others is called "speciesism" and has no more logical basis than other discriminatory beliefs like racism or sexism. Animals objectified as "livestock" often face horrors akin to those endured by the dogs in Yulin. Dogs sent to Yulin are crammed into small cages and put on trucks, which may then travel for hundreds of kilometres, often with no food or water. The same is true for millions of sheep, lambs, cows, and other animals in Australia. The country’s live-export trade is even worse, transporting animals thousands of kilometres, only to face a gruesome death. Some dogs in Yulin are, horrifyingly, boiled alive. But right here in Australia, countless chickens and turkeys meet a similar fate every day: at the abattoir, many of these intelligent birds manage to keep their heads out of the electrified water stunning baths. They are fully conscious as their throats are slit, and many are still alive as they're lowered into scalding-hot water to remove their feathers. Whether a cow or a dog, a chicken or a sheep, no animal wants to suffer and die for our palate. Yes, let's be outraged by the cruelty that takes place during the Yulin Dog Meat Festival, but let's not be hypocrites about it. We should drop the speciesism and extend our compassion to all animals by leaving them off our plates. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 desmondb@peta.org.au Final leg of veterinarian tour revealing the latest trace minerals research for optimal dairy cattle performance begins in Victoria 2019-06-20T06:00:14Z final-leg-of-veterinarian-tour-revealing-the-latest-trace-minerals-research-for-optimal-dairy-cattle-performance-begins-in-victoria Stage two of Virbac Australia’s multi-stop tour through Victoria and Tasmania has begun, and it’s being heralded as a great success by attendees so far. Designed to explain the effects of trace minerals on dairy cattle health and performance, the roadshow is being headlined by international dairy veterinarian Dr Dan Tracy, along with a host of local industry experts. The second leg saw the team visit country Victoria locations in Rochester, Numurkah and Cobram on Monday 17 and Tuesday 18 June. Producers had the chance to learn more about the latest research on trace mineral science and the impact of trace mineral injections on cow and calf immune systems, with insights on how and why trace mineral injections can improve fertility and productivity. As Dr Tracy explains, “we already know a fair bit about trace minerals as they relate to fertility – but the really interesting stuff is looking specifically at immunity and the potential for overall improvements to animal health. The US is leading the research in this area, and it really is showing us what’s achievable, with some intriguing potential solutions to help boost the overall health of dairy cows and calves.” Dairy producer Darryl Hammond from “Melaleuca Park”, Buln Buln attended last week’s Warragul event, and described the event as a great opportunity to see a lot of independent studies backing up Multimin claims. “Dr Tracy really gave us a sense of confidence with using Multimin in our dairy herd by showing us the independent data backing up what we have been seeing visually in our treated animals. I learnt a lot about how well Multimin compliments vaccines and drenches when used at the same time and I find it interesting to see the gradual improvements to growth and coat colour in our herd after treating with Multimin.” Also in attendance was Virbac Australia’s new Technical Services Manager for Nutrition, Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas, who promises to bring a wealth of experience in animal nutrition to the company in her new role. She spoke about the improvements of vaccine response when using Multimin in conjunction with 7 in 1, explaining that “nutrition – along with adequate health programs such as vaccination and drenching – is the foundation for good health. Multimin is increasingly proving its worth, not only as one of Virbac’s best-known products for fertility, but also for immunity and overall cattle health and performance.” Dr Tracy’s presentation at the roadshow’s Tinamba event was live-streamed on the Virbac Australia Primary Producer Facebook page, and is available to view here: Part 1 Part 2 During the final stage of Dr Tracy’s visit, the roadshow will tour Kirkstall, Simpson and Tyrendarra in Victoria between Thursday 20 and Friday 21 June. For more information on Virbac Australia’s injectable trace mineral Multimin, visit www.virbac.com.au/multimincattle Media Opportunity Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Tracy during the second leg of his visit, as well as attend any of the local events. - Ends – Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 Dr Dan Tracy: Dan Tracy DVM, MS received his DVM at Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. In 2002 he received his MS degree in Dairy Production Medicine at Mississippi State. Upon completion of college, Dr Tracy worked as a large animal practitioner working with beef and dairy producers. His practice experience includes dairy and beef nutrition consultation, herd heath and reproductive management. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Heifers treated with Multimin on Darryl Hammonds farm Dr Matt Ball presenting during last week’s roadshow Dr Paula Gonzalez, Dr Matt Ball, Matthew Grylls and Dr Dan Tracy Veterinarian tour has revealed the latest trace minerals research for optimal dairy cattle performance concludes in Tasmania 2019-06-18T01:37:12Z veterinarian-tour-has-revealed-the-latest-trace-minerals-research-for-optimal-dairy-cattle-performance-concludes-in-tasmania Stage one of Virbac Australia’s multi-stop tour through Victoria and Tasmania has just wrapped up, and it’s been heralded as a great success by attendees. Designed to explain the effects of trace minerals on dairy cattle health and performance, the roadshow is being headlined by international dairy veterinarian Dr Dan Tracy, along with a host of local industry experts. The first leg saw the team visit Scottsdale in Tasmania on Friday 14 June. Producers had the chance to learn more about the latest research on trace mineral science and the impact of trace mineral injections on cow and calf immune systems, with insights on how and why trace mineral injections can improve fertility and productivity. As Dr Tracy explains, “we already know a fair bit about trace minerals as they relate to fertility – but the really interesting stuff is looking specifically at immunity and the potential for overall improvements to animal health. The US is leading the research in this area, and it really is showing us what’s achievable, with some intriguing potential solutions to help boost the overall health of dairy cows and calves.” Livestock producer Tim Gunn from “Gunnston”, Waterhouse attended the Scottsdale event, and described the event as a great opportunity to learn about improving the fertility and immunity of livestock. "The take home message for me was that injectable trace minerals are the building blocks for livestock production systems, and products such as Multimin are the most efficient way to deliver trace minerals to the animal. The application of Multimin at the right time will increase both fertility and the immunity of my livestock." Dr Tracy’s presentation at the roadshow’s event in Tinamba, Victoria was live-streamed on the Virbac Australia Primary Producer Facebook page, and is available to view here: Part 1 Part 2 Next up will be the second stage of Dr Tracy’s visit, where the roadshow will tour Rochester, Numurkah, Cobram, Kirkstall, Simpson and Tyrendarra in Victoria between Monday 17 and Friday 21 June. Interested producers can contact their local Virbac Australia representative or local Virbac merchandise store for more information on how to attend these invitation-only events. For more information on Virbac Australia’s injectable trace mineral Multimin, visit www.virbac.com.au/multimincattle Media Opportunity Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Tracy during the second leg of his visit, as well as attend any of the local events. - Ends – Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 Dr Dan Tracy: Dan Tracy DVM, MS received his DVM at Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. In 2002 he received his MS degree in Dairy Production Medicine at Mississippi State. Upon completion of college, Dr Tracy worked as a large animal practitioner working with beef and dairy producers. His practice experience includes dairy and beef nutrition consultation, herd heath and reproductive management. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Dr Dan Tracy presenting during last week’s roadshow event in Scottsdale Dr Paula Gonzalez, Dr Matt Ball, Matthew Grylls and Dr Dan Tracy First leg of veterinarian tour revealing the latest trace minerals research for optimal dairy cattle performance concludes in Victoria 2019-06-17T22:53:39Z first-leg-of-veterinarian-tour-revealing-the-latest-trace-minerals-research-for-optimal-dairy-cattle-performance-concludes-in-victoria Stage one of Virbac Australia’s multi-stop tour through Victoria and Tasmania has just wrapped up, and it’s been heralded as a great success by attendees. Designed to explain the effects of trace minerals on dairy cattle health and performance, the roadshow is being headlined by international dairy veterinarian Dr Dan Tracy, along with a host of local industry experts. The first leg saw the team visit country Victoria locations in Warragul, Leongatha, Yarram, Tinamba and Sale between Tuesday 11 and Thursday 13 June. Producers had the chance to learn more about the latest research on trace mineral science and the impact of trace mineral injections on cow and calf immune systems, with insights on how and why trace mineral injections can improve fertility and productivity. As Dr Tracy explains, “we already know a fair bit about trace minerals as they relate to fertility – but the really interesting stuff is looking specifically at immunity and the potential for overall improvements to animal health. The US is leading the research in this area, and it really is showing us what’s achievable, with some intriguing potential solutions to help boost the overall health of dairy cows and calves.” Dairy producer Darryl Hammond from “Melaleuca Park”, Buln Buln attended the Warragul event, and described the event as a great opportunity to see a lot of independent studies backing up Multimin claims. “Dr Tracy really gave us a sense of confidence with using Multimin in our dairy herd by showing us the independent data backing up what we have been seeing visually in our treated animals. I learnt a lot about how well Multimin compliments vaccines and drenches when used at the same time and I find it interesting to see the gradual improvements to growth and coat colour in our herd after treating with Multimin.” Also in attendance was Virbac Australia’s new Technical Services Manager for Nutrition, Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas, who promises to bring a wealth of experience in animal nutrition to the company in her new role. She spoke about the improvements of vaccine response when using Multimin in conjunction with 7 in 1, explaining that “nutrition – along with adequate health programs such as vaccination and drenching – is the foundation for good health. Multimin is increasingly proving its worth, not only as one of Virbac’s best-known products for fertility, but also for immunity and overall cattle health and performance.” Dr Tracy’s presentation at the roadshow’s Tinamba event was live-streamed on the Virbac Australia Primary Producer Facebook page, and is available to view here: Part 1 Part 2 Next up will be the second stage of Dr Tracy’s visit, where the roadshow will tour Rochester, Numurkah, Cobram, Kirkstall, Simpson and Tyrendarra in Victoria between Monday 17 and Friday 21 June. Interested producers can contact their local Virbac Australia representative or local Virbac merchandise store for more information on how to attend these invitation-only events. For more information on Virbac Australia’s injectable trace mineral Multimin, visit www.virbac.com.au/multimincattle Media Opportunity Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Tracy during the second leg of his visit, as well as attend any of the local events. - Ends – Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 Dr Dan Tracy: Dan Tracy DVM, MS received his DVM at Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. In 2002 he received his MS degree in Dairy Production Medicine at Mississippi State. Upon completion of college, Dr Tracy worked as a large animal practitioner working with beef and dairy producers. His practice experience includes dairy and beef nutrition consultation, herd heath and reproductive management. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Heifers treated with Multimin on Darryl Hammonds farm Dr Matt Ball presenting during last week’s roadshow Dr Paula Gonzalez, Dr Matt Ball, Matthew Grylls and Dr Dan Tracy Leading veterinarian to reveal the latest trace minerals research for optimal dairy cattle performance in Victoria roadshow. 2019-06-10T10:17:05Z leading-veterinarian-to-reveal-the-latest-trace-minerals-research-for-optimal-dairy-cattle-performance-in-victoria-roadshow-2 Animal health company Virbac Australia will shortly be commencing a two-week-long roadshow throughout Victoria and Tasmania to explain the effects of trace minerals on dairy cattle health and performance. The multi-stop tour will be headlined by international dairy veterinarian Dr Dan Tracy, who will be joined by a host of local industry experts. It promises to be a unique opportunity to learn more about the latest research on trace mineral science and the impact of trace mineral injections on cow and calf immune systems, with insights on how and why trace mineral injections can improve herd fertility. Trace minerals are an essential component of dairy cattle nutrition. Producers will benefit from optimising levels across their herd. "Our research has found that trace mineral injections can result in improved reproductive efficiency and reduced diseases in cows and calves,” says Dr Tracy. “Fertility and immunity problems can be corrected with mineral injections, and we aim to deliver the key findings of the latest studies into this area, and reveal how producers can optimise their dairy herds using trace mineral injections.” Virbac Australia Livestock Nutrition Specialist Dr Jerry Liu describes Dr Tracy’s tour as a great way for producers to hear from an expert in the field. “Dr Tracy has many years of experience in the area of animal nutrition, herd health and reproductive management. We’re looking forward to hearing his findings, which should be a real help to Southern producers wanting to get their herd performance ready,” says Dr Liu. The tour will be country Victoria, where the team will appear at events in Simpson, Kirkstall and Tyrendarra on Thursday 20 and Friday 21 June. Interested producers are invited to attend their local event. Please see below RSVP details. For more information on Virbac Australia’s injectable trace mineral Multimin, visit www.virbac.com.au/multimincattle Day Time Town Venue RSVP Thurs 20th June 11am-1pm Simpson, VIC Simpson Ball & Chain Hotel MGT Simpson, Jeff Holmes 0417 321 343 jeff.holmes@mgc.com.au MGT Colac, Harold Hanlon 0488 009 286 harold.hanlon@mgc.com.au Parlours Simpson, Richard Parlour 0429 943 002 parlours@bigpond.com The Co-op Colac, Mark Slater 0408 529 319 admin@coopcolac.com.au Fri 21st June 10am-12pm Kirkstall, VIC Kirkstall Hotel MGT Koroit, Kelvin Monigatti 0458 350 301 kelvin.monigatti@mgc.com.au Fri 21st June 1.30pm-3pm Tyrendarra, VIC Radnor Properties, (at the end of Doelles Road) MGT Heywood, Kerri Neal 0417 326 252 kerri.neal@saputo.com Media Opportunity Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Tracy during his visit, as well as attend the event. - Ends – Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 Dr Dan Tracy: Dan Tracy DVM, MS received his DVM at Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. In 2002 he received his MS degree in Dairy Production Medicine at Mississippi State. Upon completion of college, Dr Tracy worked as a large animal practitioner working with beef and dairy producers. His practice experience includes dairy and beef nutrition consultation, herd heath and reproductive management. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Dr Dan Tracy 2018 Multimin Roadshow Event Leading veterinarian to reveal the latest trace minerals research for optimal dairy cattle performance in Victoria roadshow. 2019-06-10T10:00:27Z leading-veterinarian-to-reveal-the-latest-trace-minerals-research-for-optimal-dairy-cattle-performance-in-victoria-roadshow-1 Animal health company Virbac Australia will shortly be commencing a two-week-long roadshow throughout Victoria and Tasmania to explain the effects of trace minerals on dairy cattle health and performance. The multi-stop tour will be headlined by international dairy veterinarian Dr Dan Tracy, who will be joined by a host of local industry experts. It promises to be a unique opportunity to learn more about the latest research on trace mineral science and the impact of trace mineral injections on cow and calf immune systems, with insights on how and why trace mineral injections can improve herd fertility. Trace minerals are an essential component of dairy cattle nutrition. Producers will benefit from optimising levels across their herd. "Our research has found that trace mineral injections can result in improved reproductive efficiency and reduced diseases in cows and calves,” says Dr Tracy. “Fertility and immunity problems can be corrected with mineral injections, and we aim to deliver the key findings of the latest studies into this area, and reveal how producers can optimise their dairy herds using trace mineral injections.” Virbac Australia Livestock Nutrition Specialist Dr Jerry Liu describes Dr Tracy’s tour as a great way for producers to hear from an expert in the field. “Dr Tracy has many years of experience in the area of animal nutrition, herd health and reproductive management. We’re looking forward to hearing his findings, which should be a real help to Southern producers wanting to get their herd performance ready,” says Dr Liu. The tour will be country Victoria, where the team will appear at events in Rochester and Numurkah on Monday 17 and Tuesday 18 June. Interested producers are invited to attend their local event. Please see below RSVP details. For more information on Virbac Australia’s injectable trace mineral Multimin, visit www.virbac.com.au/multimincattle Day Time Town Venue RSVP Monday 17th June 12-2pm Rochester, VIC Criterion Hotel MG Trading Rochester Steve & Ray: 03 5484 1005 Tuesday 18th June 9am Numurkah, VIC MG Trading Numurkah MGT Numurkah Liam: 03 5862 1166 Media Opportunity Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Tracy during his visit, as well as attend the event. - Ends – Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 Dr Dan Tracy: Dan Tracy DVM, MS received his DVM at Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. In 2002 he received his MS degree in Dairy Production Medicine at Mississippi State. Upon completion of college, Dr Tracy worked as a large animal practitioner working with beef and dairy producers. His practice experience includes dairy and beef nutrition consultation, herd heath and reproductive management. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Dr Dan Tracy 2018 Multimin Roadshow Event Virbac Australia poised to advance Australian livestock nutrition with a brand new addition to the team 2019-06-07T02:35:21Z virbac-australia-poised-to-advance-australian-livestock-nutrition-with-a-brand-new-addition-to-the-team Virbac Australia has reaffirmed its commitment to livestock nutrition with the recent hire of a new Technical Services Manager for Nutrition. The animal health company welcomes new recruit Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas, who will bring a wealth of experience in animal nutrition following a fixed term role as a Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne School of Agriculture and Food. As an expert in livestock production, Dr Gonzalez-Rivas is a veterinarian from Chile with a Masters in animal studies from the University of Queensland and a PhD in Agricultural Sciences. She brings five years of experience in small and large animal practice in Chile, and six years of experience in research applied to nutrition and heat stress in ruminants. During her research career, Dr Gonzalez-Rivas conducted cutting edge research into the relationship between nutrition, the environment and livestock production. During her Masters, she studied Northern Beef phosphorous deficiencies, while in her PhD she focused on heat stress amelioration in ruminants using nutritional approaches. She then completed a post-doctorate fellowship that explored the effects of heat stress on meat quality in feedlot cattle. With this experience, Dr Gonzalez-Rivas brings world class knowledge relating to the impact of animal nutrition on health and production, particularly during periods of high demand such as joining, calving and weaning, and during challenging environmental conditions. With Virbac Australia’s reputation for focusing on the needs of veterinarians and farmers to deliver innovative solutions to improve animal health, Dr Gonzalez-Rivas is well placed to contribute to the company’s continued success. “I’m looking forward to working with farmers and veterinarians to create better animal health and production by improving nutrition and address their needs and concerns in this area,” she says. “I will have the opportunity to interact with farmers and veterinarians across the country and provide advice on animal nutrition and the benefits of Multimin trace mineral injection, one of Virbac Australia’s best-known products for immunity, health and fertility.” “Having a strong team that’s 100% focused on Multimin is unique,” Dr Gonzalez-Rivas continues. “Multimin has demonstrated its efficacy in Australia and around the world. I hope to contribute with my veterinary and scientific knowledge to support the brand by developing strategies to help producers improve their productivity.” As part of her new role, Dr Gonzalez-Rivas plans to spearhead trials that demonstrate the known benefits of Multimin under Australian conditions. She will also investigate currently undiscovered benefits of Multimin in other areas of animal health and production, as well as present seminars and attend meetings and roadshows to share her knowledge with Australian producers, vets, and other industry professionals. With Australian producers continuously placing more importance on nutrition, Virbac Australia’s latest hiring decision is part of their goal to provide the industry with industry leading trace mineral advice and solutions for all stages of production – particularly during periods of high demand, and in a constantly changing environment affected by challenging weather conditions. As Dr Gonzalez-Rivas explains, “nutrition – along with adequate health programs such as vaccination and drenching – is the base for good health. I’m excited to work with Virbac to advance the work that’s already been achieved in this area by the country’s leader in the animal health market.” To find out more about Virbac Australia, visit au.virbac.com - Ends - Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Adam Arndell - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Photo caption: Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas during cattle research trial Virbac Australia plant Leading veterinarian to reveal the latest trace minerals research for optimal dairy cattle performance in Tasmania. 2019-06-05T21:07:34Z leading-veterinarian-to-reveal-the-latest-trace-minerals-research-for-optimal-dairy-cattle-performance-in-tasmania Animal health company Virbac Australia will shortly be commencing a two-week-long roadshow throughout Victoria and Tasmania to explain the effects of trace minerals on dairy cattle health and performance. The multi-stop tour will be headlined by international dairy veterinarian Dr Dan Tracy, who will be joined by a host of local industry experts. It promises to be a unique opportunity to learn more about the latest research on trace mineral science and the impact of trace mineral injections on cow and calf immune systems, with insights on how and why trace mineral injections can improve herd fertility. Trace minerals are an essential component of dairy cattle nutrition. Producers will benefit from optimising levels across their herd. "Our research has found that trace mineral injections can result in improved reproductive efficiency and reduced diseases in cows and calves,” says Dr Tracy. “Fertility and immunity problems can be corrected with mineral injections, and we aim to deliver the key findings of the latest studies into this area, and reveal how producers can optimise their dairy herds using trace mineral injections.” Virbac Australia Livestock Nutrition Specialist Dr Jerry Liu describes Dr Tracy’s tour as a great way for producers to hear from an expert in the field. “Dr Tracy has many years of experience in the area of animal nutrition, herd health and reproductive management. We’re looking forward to hearing his findings, which should be a real help to Southern producers wanting to get their herd performance ready,” says Dr Liu. The tour’s second leg will be Tasmania, where the team will appear at an event in Scottsdale on Friday 14 June. Interested producers are invited to contact Virbac representative Rob Youl on 0412 742 307, or email rob.youl@virbac.com.au for more information on how to attend. For more information on Virbac Australia’s injectable trace mineral Multimin, visit www.virbac.com.au/multimincattle Day Time Town Venue Friday 14th June 12-1.30pm Scottsdale, TAS RSL Community Club, 30 George St Media Opportunity Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Tracy during his visit, as well as attend the event. - Ends – Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 Dr Dan Tracy: Dan Tracy DVM, MS received his DVM at Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. In 2002 he received his MS degree in Dairy Production Medicine at Mississippi State. Upon completion of college, Dr Tracy worked as a large animal practitioner working with beef and dairy producers. His practice experience includes dairy and beef nutrition consultation, herd heath and reproductive management. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Dr Dan Tracy 2018 Multimin Roadshow Event Leading veterinarian to reveal the latest trace minerals research for optimal dairy cattle performance in Victoria roadshow. 2019-06-02T23:13:09Z leading-veterinarian-to-reveal-the-latest-trace-minerals-research-for-optimal-dairy-cattle-performance-in-victoria-roadshow Animal health company Virbac Australia will shortly be commencing a two-week-long roadshow throughout Victoria and Tasmania to explain the effects of trace minerals on dairy cattle health and performance. The multi-stop tour will be headlined by international dairy veterinarian Dr Dan Tracy, who will be joined by a host of local industry experts. It promises to be a unique opportunity to learn more about the latest research on trace mineral science and the impact of trace mineral injections on cow and calf immune systems, with insights on how and why trace mineral injections can improve herd fertility. With trace minerals being an essential component of dairy cattle nutrition, deficiencies are known to be the primary source of productivity losses for animals lacking optimal levels. "Our research has found that trace mineral injections can result in improved reproductive efficiency and reduced diseases in cows and calves,” says Dr Tracy. “Fertility and immunity problems can be corrected with mineral injections, and we aim to deliver the key findings of the latest studies into this area, and reveal how producers can optimise their dairy herds using trace mineral injections.” Virbac Australia Livestock Nutrition Specialist Dr Jerry Liu describes Dr Tracy’s tour as a great way for producers to hear from an expert in the field. “Dr Tracy has many years of experience in the area of animal nutrition, herd health and reproductive management. We’re looking forward to hearing his findings, which should be a real help to Southern producers wanting to get their herd performance ready,” says Dr Liu. The tour’s first stop will be country Victoria, where the team will appear at events in Warragul, Leongatha, Yarram, Tinamba and Sale between Tuesday 11 and Thursday 13 June. Please note: This is an invitation-only event. Please contact your local Virbac Australia representative or your local Virbac merchandise store for more information on how to attend. For more information on Virbac Australia’s injectable trace mineral Multimin, visit www.virbac.com.au/multimincattle Day Time Town Venue Tuesday 11th June 12-2pm Warragul, VIC Warragul Country Club Tuesday 11th June 7pm Leongatha, VIC Leongatha RSL Wednesday 12th June 12-2pm Yarram, VIC Yarram Country Club Wednesday 12th June 7pm Tinamba, VIC Tinamba Hotel Thursday 13th June 12-2pm Sale, VIC Criterion Hotel Media Opportunity Virbac Australia welcomes the media to interview Dr Tracy during his visit, as well as attend any of the local events. - Ends – Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 Dr Dan Tracy: Dan Tracy DVM, MS received his DVM at Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine in 2001. In 2002 he received his MS degree in Dairy Production Medicine at Mississippi State. Upon completion of college, Dr Tracy worked as a large animal practitioner working with beef and dairy producers. His practice experience includes dairy and beef nutrition consultation, herd heath and reproductive management. Virbac Australia: Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Dr Dan Tracy 2018 Multimin Roadshow Event Water great idea 2019-05-30T11:37:23Z water-great-idea Dear Editor, NSW has imposed water restrictions, stating that water inflows are the lowest since 1940. Now is the time to consider ways to save water. It's undeniable that between irrigating the crops that farmed animals eat, providing millions of animals with drinking water each year, and washing away the filth of factory farms, transport trucks and slaughterhouses, animal agriculture places a tremendous strain on our precious water supply. It takes on average 4,000 litres of water to produce a steak. It takes over 500 litres of water to produce a litre of milk. A combined study carried out by the University of Melbourne's School of Social and Environmental Enquiry and its Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering found that a vegetarian diet could save households up to 35 percent of their total water usage, 13 times the volume of water that would be saved by not watering the garden. Going vegan saves over 4,000 litres every day, and not eating a kilo of meat saves more water than not showering for twelve months. In addition to being terrible for the environment, today's factory farms cram intelligent animals by the thousands into dark, filthy cages or windowless sheds, where they are denied everything that makes life worth living. You can save water, save money, and save hundreds of animals from a life of suffering and a terrifying death, just by going vegan. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au No-wool week 2019-05-21T08:40:10Z no-wool-week Dear Editor, "Wool Week" is the ideal time for everyone to consider the brutality of the wool industry and resolve to use alternative fabrics. The appalling cruelty in Australian shearing sheds was revealed by a PETA exposé in 2014, and helped lead to the first-ever convictions of shearers anywhere in the world for cruelty to animals. The wool industry told us this a "wake-up call" and vowed to stamp out these abuses. Yet subsequent video exposés (accessible at PETA.org.au) reveals that absolutely nothing has changed. Workers continue to beat, stamp on, kick, mutilate, and throw sheep around while shearing them. Shearers violently punch these gentle animals in the face and beat and jab them in the head with sharp metal shears. These attacks often leave the petrified sheep bleeding from the eyes, nose, and mouth. Many lambs are also forced to endure a gruesome procedure called “mulesing”, in which huge chunks of skin and flesh are cut from the animals’ backsides, sometimes without any painkillers. The best way to stop this violence is by refusing to buy the industry’s products. Check the label when you’re shopping. If it says "wool," just leave it on the shelf. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Strategist People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Australia) PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002. (08) 8556-5828 Target Sheep event supports Armidale producers in the fight against worms 2019-05-19T21:30:43Z target-sheep-event-supports-armidale-producers-in-the-fight-against-worms Virbac Australia’s latest Target Sheep program event has just wrapped up, with attendees describing the afternoon’s proceedings held last Friday in Armidale, NSW as a golden opportunity to learn more about parasite management, with a special focus on current drench resistance levels in the New England region. The Target Sheep animal health initiative is aimed at optimising the health and performance of livestock at three key stages of the production cycle; pre-joining, pre-lambing and marking/weaning - by focusing on how we can increase productivity by managing drench resistance, and improving health and reproduction through strategic topping up of trace minerals and an effective vaccination program. The program brings together industry experts, veterinarians and producers to improve on-farm productivity and profitability through leading animal health management practices and industry benchmarks. Key speakers at the event included Invetus Parasitology Research Leader, Tim Elliott and Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager, William Hiscox. During his presentation, William explained the importance of the program, based on findings from Faecal Egg Count Reduction Tests (FECRT) that have been undertaken throughout the New England region which have been independently analysed by Invetus Parasitology. “The results indicated that every farm we tested showed a varying level of drench resistance and no two farms were the same,” William revealed. “The results really highlighted the need for all sheep producers to carry out Faecal Egg Count Reduction Test’s and be aware of the resistance levels on their farm. In some cases even neighbouring properties had completely different levels of resistance.” Meanwhile, Tim’s presentation educated producers about worm biology and their life cycle, with tips on pasture management strategies to reduce the seasonal risk of internal parasites specific to the New England. “Drought conditions, such as those currently in the New England region, can make worm management even more challenging,” said Tim. “These types of ongoing drought conditions-with-sporadic-rain events can lead to a much greater variable worm risk, because small rain events can trigger faster more concentrated parasite outbreaks. With there being already high levels of resistance in this particular region, it’s important for producers to tackle this problem head on and tailor a drench program that’s suited to the drench resistance status of their farm.” Almost 20 local sheep producers attended Friday’s event, and Philip Carlon from Queenlee Merino Stud at Uralla explained why he was excited to be a part of the Virbac Target Sheep program. “I think the whole sheep industry needs to be aware of their individual resistance status so we can prolong the drenches we have available and take advantage of the current strong lamb and wool prices moving forward. The Target Sheep group is a step in the right direction for a collaborative approach to fighting drench resistance,” Philip said. With the event demonstrating Virbac Australia’s continuing commitment to supporting producers in the fight against drench resistance, each attendee also has ongoing free worm egg count testing provided by Virbac for the entirety of the program “We encouraged all attendees to continue monitoring their sheep throughout the duration of the program,” said William. “Hopefully this has been a useful discussion for the group, and it’s given them some useful information to now go out and act on.” Virbac will be hosting further Target Sheep and Target Beef events throughout Australia in the coming months. For more information, visit https://au.virbac.com, follow Virbac Australia on Facebook or Instagram or call 1800 242 100. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Adam Arndell - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0403 372 889 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au Expert-led weaner management roadshow tours Tasmania on first leg of nationwide event 2019-05-14T00:55:48Z expert-led-weaner-management-roadshow-tours-tasmania-on-first-leg-of-nationwide-event Two industry experts will shortly be hosting a Virbac Australia Cydectin Long Acting Weaner Management Roadshow at venues across Tasmania, as they present invaluable information to farmers on weaner management best practice fluke and worm control. Dr Matthew Ball (Beacon Veterinary Clinic owner and Livestock Technical Services Manager at Virbac Animal Health) and Dr Craig Dwyer, (Clinical Lead for Apiam Animal Health Group) will be touring the country on the first leg of what’s set to be a nationwide tour of Australia. As Dr Dwyer explains, weaning is a time of increased stress for young animals, due to a range of factors. “Whether from the stress of being separated from their mothers, the loss of milk in their diet or close confinement with other animals in the yard, these factors can take their toll, making calves more susceptible to both infectious and non-infectious diseases.” The recent change of season can also bring increased rainfall, which heightens the chance of an animal being infected with internal parasites like worms and liver fluke, causing a loss of condition, scours and anaemia in weaners up to 24 months of age. Dr Dwyer is convinced that “a good animal health program is the best form of defence once weaners are in the yard, because it gives them the best possible chance for optimal health and wellbeing as they grow.” Together, the veterinarians will take a practical look at various aspects of weaner health and wellbeing, with a particular focus on the best types and compositions of drench, fluke and worm products. Dr Ball explains that “it can be challenging to make sense of which drench is best suited to weaners. Which drenches are ‘knock-downs’ and which protect for longer? Do weaners need the same drench as cows? Which fluke and worm products are best for productivity? Which chemicals are safe for dung beetles? How do you combine different products into a program? What’s the best way to manage or prevent fluke and worm drench resistance? We’ll answer all these questions and more during the course of our presentations.” For Virbac Australia Tasmania Sales Manager Rob Youl, the roadshow is a great opportunity to learn from leaders in their field. “The presentations from Dr Dwyer and Dr Ball will provide attendees with practical information that can be applied directly on their farm. This promises to be a unique experience for beef and dairy producers, as they learn the latest and most effective weaner management programs for improved cattle health.” Interested producers are invited to contact Virbac representative Rob Youl on 0412 742 307, or email rob.youl@virbac.com.au for more information on how to attend. Tasmania roadshow itinerary: Date Location Time 21 May 2019 Agritas Conference Centre, Smithton 12pm Lunch available. 22 May 2019 The Boomerang, Currie King Island 12pm Lunch available. About the speakers Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 18 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Dr Craig Dwyer Former President of Australian Cattle Vets and Veterinarian, Dr Craig Dwyer graduated from Queensland University in 1998. After graduation he worked in dairy practice in Smithton Tasmania before continuing his career in England and Wales. Craig then returned to Smithton Veterinary Service where he became a partner in the practice. This practice is now part of the Apiam Animal Health group and Craig acts as Clinic Lead for the Tasmanian practices. Craig has completed the Sydney University postgraduate course in ruminant nutrition and in 2007 passed his membership exams in ruminant animal nutrition. Craig’s veterinary interests include cattle reproduction, bull fertility, nutrition and production. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Matthew Ball, Livestock Technical Services Manager at Virbac Australia Dr Craig Dwyer, Clinical Lead for Apiam Animal Health Group Rethinking sheepishness 2019-05-13T20:53:11Z rethinking-sheepishness Dear Editor, Have you ever been accused of acting like a sheep? It's a compliment! A new study by a neuroscientist shows that sheep are complex, individualistic, and social animals. But farmers still treat sheep as mere commodities, which makes it easier to confine, torment and slaughter them. Sheep have excellent vision and hearing, as well as sense of smell. They have extremely sophisticated face recognition skills and can interpret emotions on the faces of other sheep. They can also recognise human faces, even when those faces are shown to them in different orientations. Tests show that sheep can feel optimistic or pessimistic – just like humans, sheep who have had bad experiences in the past tend to not do as well on cognitive tasks as those who had good experiences. Sheep also have individual personalities – distinctive combinations of traits that are consistent over time and that map readily onto some of the personality dimensions we recognize in humans, such as boldness or shyness. Knowing this, it’s abhorrent that farmers routinely punch holes in lambs' ears, chop off their tails, and castrate males without the use of anaesthetics. In Australia, many lambs are also forced to endure a gruesome procedure called "mulesing", in which huge chunks of skin and flesh are cut from the animals' backsides, sometimes without any painkillers. PETA exposés have consistently shown shearing sheds to be among the worst places in the world for cruelty to animals. And when their monetary value diminishes, sheep are often shipped across the equator to the other side of the world in appalling conditions; those who survive the trips will meet a gruesome death in countries where animal welfare standards are even lower than Australia's. Sheep are intelligent, complex, and feeling individuals. Treating them as unfeeling commodities may be profitable, but it is totally immoral. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 08 8556-5828 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Virbac Australia to present a series of cattle health sessions at this year’s Gympie Show 2019-05-13T00:30:48Z virbac-australia-to-present-a-series-of-cattle-health-sessions-at-this-years-gympie-show The ever-popular Gympie Show is back – and this year, animal health company Virbac Australia will be part of the line-up as they present a series of cattle health sessions designed to support producers with tips and advice on improving animal productivity and profitability. With cattle ticks in the Gympie region being especially problematic for young weaner cattle, Virbac Australia is running four presentations to help farmers improve the immunity and health of young weaner cattle, as well as identify the best broad spectrum long-acting drench and trace mineral supplements to support them at this critical time in their development. Delivered by Victor Moffroid, Area Sales Manager for the Gympie region, he’ll also be demonstrating the correct application method for injectable long-acting drenches and injectable trace mineral supplements. Events run at the Showground Cattle Yards on Thursday May 16th at 12.00pm and 4.00pm, and Friday 17th May at 10:30am and 2:30pm. They’re free to attend, and interested media and event visitors are invited to turn up and register on the day. Everyone that registers will go into the draw to win a 200ml pack of Cydectin Long Acting Injection for Cattle, with the winner drawn on Friday 17th May. This year’s Gympie Show promises to offer an amazing experience for all, and Virbac Australia is looking forward to being part of what has over the years become a major highlight of the regions agricultural calendar. To find out more about Virbac Australia, please visit https://au.virbac.com/ Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Victor Moffroid, Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager Beef producer administering Cydectin LA