The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2020-04-05T20:00:00Z New Online School Resources Launch - 'Chicken farming in the living world' 2020-04-05T20:00:00Z new-online-school-resources-launch-chicken-farming-in-the-living-world ‘Chicken Farming in the Living World’ Starts School! Australian Chicken Meat Federation launches new, online national school resources The Australian Chicken Meat Federation Inc. (ACMF) has today launched a series of new, online school resources, ‘Chicken Farming in the Living World’. The resources reflect the latest updates to the Australian curriculum and offer unique curriculum content within the ’Living World’ strands of the K-10 New South Wales Science syllabuses. These resources are also aligned with the ‘Biological Science’ strand of the Australian curriculum. The ‘Chicken Farming in the Living World’ inquiry teaching resource series explores how humans use chickens for meat. This resource uses videos created by the peak industry body representing the Australian chicken meat industry, the Australian Chicken Meat Federation Inc. (ACMF) with the supporting teaching resources developed by experienced primary and secondary school teachers. Dr Vivien Kite, Executive Director, ACMF comments, “Chickens are fascinating animals and provide students with an interesting subject matter to discuss the many aspects of our living world, from the interactions between humans and animals, how we create food from animals, how scientific knowledge influences our living world, right through to understanding what a managed ecosystem looks like in the context of a broader natural ecosystem. As the industry peak body, it is important that such resources are developed – to inform and ensure an understanding of how chicken meat is produced while remaining in step with the shift in classroom teaching over recent years, from teacher-led learning and activities to a student-led approach.” The content offers teachers new ready to ‘plug and play’ resources from the ‘Living World’ strand and provide curriculum content tailored to each school stage across primary and secondary school. The resources address the following questions: Stage 1 – Years 1-2 – How do humans use plants and animals? Stage 2 – Years 3-4 – How do we create food and fibre from animals and plants? Stage 3 – Years 5-6 – Why is it important for food and / or fibre to be produced sustainably? Stage 4 – Years 7-8 – What scientific knowledge has influenced the current agricultural practices of the chicken meat industry? Stage 5 – Years 9-10 – How does the closed system of a chicken meat farm model the interactions, flow of energy and the cycling of matter through a natural ecosystem? To access the ‘Chicken Farming in the Living World’ resources teachers, educators and parents can visit the ‘School Resources’ page of the ACMF website (www.chicken.org.au) or the educational platform Scootle. NOTES TO THE EDITOR: About the Australian Chicken Meat Federation (ACMF) The Australian Chicken Meat Federation (ACMF) is the national, peak organisation for those involved in the chicken meat industry in Australia, including chicken farmers and chicken meat processors. Its main aim is to represent the interests of the industry in a wide range of matters including animal health, biosecurity, food standards, food safety, international trade, quarantine, and animal welfare. One of the ACMF’s most important roles is to also provide information to the public about the Australian chicken meat industry, how it operates and about its products. This includes the importance of healthy eating and the role chicken meat can play as a key nutritional element of today’s modern diet and as an integral part of a healthy and sustainable diet for the future. www.chicken.org.au Follow ACMF on Twitter - @ACMFchicken - ENDS – Issued by QUAY Communications on behalf of the Australian Chicken Meat Federation For more information or images please contact: Emma Norgrove, QUAY Communications, M: 0499 688 001, T: 02 9386 9161 Cheryl Pettinau, QUAY Communications, 02 9386 9161 / 0424 157 714 Shell-shocked at Easter 2020-04-05T07:12:30Z shell-shocked-at-easter The Editor Dear Editor, Soon, Australians will be celebrating Easter, though likely in quieter conditions than usual. We will watch the typical images of fluffy chicks and colourful eggs from our well-worn couches and over-used televisions. Let's take this unusual Easter as an opportunity to question the reality behind these falsely bucolic images. Compassionate Australians would be shell-shocked to see the routine cruelties and deaths that come with egg production. In this industry, male chicks are considered waste product, and are killed shortly after birth via maceration. This can be a cruel, inexact process, where baby boys are sent down a conveyor belt, still chirping for their mothers, to be minced alive. In some cases, machinery has been inexact, meaning that the chicks have had only their legs sliced off, and remained alive, in agony. Australian Eggs—an industry body—have acknowledged that maceration provides "awful and confronting imagery" and proposed gassing these chicks with carbon dioxide before they are sliced up. However, this process also leads to great suffering, leaving chicks gasping and shaking their heads for up to two minutes before they finally die. Female chicks who grow into hens have a longer, but similarly painful life. They are housed in cramped, filthy barns or cages, where they cannot enjoy any of their healthy, natural behaviours. Cage-free hens are maimed by having the tips of their beak sliced off, to avoid the pecking and cannibalism that comes with being confined in such excruciating conditions. There is no such thing as a "humane" egg, whether "free-range", "cage-free", or caged. Those of us currently living through confinement—albeit, with an end date—can show compassion for chickens by refusing to eat their eggs, and rejecting all other animal-derived ingredients in future. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 desmondb@peta.org.au Cootamundra local is 1 of 12 selected for Round 1 of the national Multimin Performance Ready Challenge 2020-04-02T04:59:47Z cootamundra-local-is-1-of-12-selected-for-round-1-of-the-national-multimin-performance-ready-challenge Animal health company Virbac Australia is excited to announce the first challengers to take part in the 2020/2021 Multimin Performance Ready Challenge (MPRC) – a 12-month program that will see up to 75 Australian farmers experience firsthand the benefits of trace mineral management at high demand production times in sheep and cattle. The company has reported receiving an overwhelming response from top-quality beef, sheep and dairy producers, all hoping to take part. Following the selection of 13 entrants to the first round, each challenger will be guided by veterinarians and livestock nutrition experts, while also working closely with their local Virbac representative, as they use their supplies of Multimin to test the effects on animal fertility, health and ultimately their financial bottom-line. Challengers will then go into the running to win an overseas trip for two to the USA tailored to their professional development and farming system, plus a 12-month supply of Multimin. Second and third runners up will also receive six months of free Multimin. Round one challengers have been named as Ben Pender – Bairnsdale, VIC, Peter Fort – Byaduk North, VIC, Debbie Geddes – Mudgegonga, VIC, Rosie Davenport – Derby, TAS, Bill Mitchell – Aberfoyle, NSW, Tim Reid – Roslyn, NSW, Tim Phelan – Clarence Town, NSW, James Burge – Cootamundra, NSW, Adam Coffey – Miriam Vale, QLD, Colin Burnett – Julia Creek, QLD, Rodney Blanch – Manango, QLD, James Morris – Narrikup, WA and Brett Shephard – Kybybolite, SA – and as Dr Jerry Liu, Multimin Marketing Manager explains, “this is a fantastic opportunity for our first challengers to gain expert support from some of Australia’s most experienced animal experts as they hone their operations.” Rosie Davenport from Derby in Tasmania spoke of her reaction to the news. “I’m very excited to be included in this years Multimin Challenge,” she says. “I am looking forward to receiving advice from the Multimin experts on how to raise healthier stock by using Multimin on a regular basis.” “I’ve read a fair bit about this mineral injection,’ says challenger Brett Shepard, from Kybybolite, South Australia “but up til now I haven’t had the opportunity to really study the benefits from up close. I’m looking forward to seeing how it performs.” Two challengers from each of the four rounds will be selected and go on to compete in the finals with the winning challenger chosen by a panel of expert judges. In addition a national “People’s Choice” winner from the eight finalists will be chosen by the public and awarded a further six month supply of Multimin. This first round will also see local producer James Burge participate and share his journey and results using Multimin in his livestock operation. James is a farmer in the Cootamundra region with his wife Sally. They run a mixed farming enterprise, including 1200 Composite Ewes, 2100 Merino Ewes and a cropping program including wheat Canola and Barley. Sally is a local Vet who handles large and small animals along with a reproduction in Horses. This is James’s first year using Multimin and he hopes by competing in the challenge that he can see results such as having healthy rugged sheep with a low mortality rate. Participants are encouraged to share their journey online via the dedicated Multimin Performance Ready facebook group, where interested farmers can follow the challenge and also read more about each of the challengers: facebook.com/groups/multimin The first round of participants may have already been chosen ­– but the challenge remains open for applicants hoping to compete for places in rounds two, three and four. Anyone interested in winning the experience of a lifetime tailored to their professional development and farming system, plus 12 months’ worth of Multimin is invited to apply at www.multiminchallenge.com. About Multimin Virbac's Multimin Injection is a trace mineral top up that rapidly increases trace mineral levels in cattle and sheep for use during high demand periods. Providing selenium, copper, manganese, and zinc at strategic times of the production cycle has been shown to improve livestock health and fertility, thus optimising livestock productivity. Ends Media Enquiries: Kyleen Partridge - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 | 0467 612 224 kyleen.partridge@c7even.com.au Please note profile introductions of each challenger are also available. SUPPLIED PHOTO CAPTION: This first round will see local mixed farming operator James Burge from Cootamundra, NSW participate and share his journey and results using Multimin in his livestock operation. Kybybolite local is 1 of 12 selected for Round 1 of the national Multimin Performance Ready Challenge 2020-04-02T02:04:50Z kybybolite-local-is-1-of-12-selected-for-round-1-of-the-national-multimin-performance-ready-challenge Animal health company Virbac Australia is excited to announce the first challengers to take part in the 2020/2021 Multimin Performance Ready Challenge (MPRC) – a 12-month program that will see up to 75 Australian farmers experience firsthand the benefits of trace mineral management at high demand production times in sheep and cattle. The company has reported receiving an overwhelming response from top-quality beef, sheep and dairy producers, all hoping to take part. Following the selection of 13 entrants to the first round, each challenger will be guided by veterinarians and livestock nutrition experts, while also working closely with their local Virbac representative, as they use their supplies of Multimin to test the effects on animal fertility, health and ultimately their financial bottom-line. Challengers will then go into the running to win an overseas trip for two to the USA tailored to their professional development and farming system, plus a 12-month supply of Multimin. Second and third runners up will also receive six months of free Multimin. Round one challengers have been named as Ben Pender – Bairnsdale, VIC, Peter Fort – Byaduk North, VIC, Debbie Geddes – Mudgegonga, VIC, Rosie Davenport – Derby, TAS, Bill Mitchell – Aberfoyle, NSW, Tim Reid – Roslyn, NSW, Tim Phelan – Clarence Town, NSW, James Burge – Cootamundra, NSW, Adam Coffey – Miriam Vale, QLD, Colin Burnett – Julia Creek, QLD, Rodney Blanch – Manango, QLD, James Morris – Narrikup, WA and Brett Shepard – Kybybolite, SA – and as Dr Jerry Liu, Multimin Marketing Manager explains, “this is a fantastic opportunity for our first challengers to gain expert support from some of Australia’s most experienced animal experts as they hone their operations.” Rosie Davenport from Derby in Tasmania spoke of her reaction to the news. “I’m very excited to be included in this year’s Multimin Challenge,” she says. “I am looking forward to receiving advice from the Multimin experts on how to raise healthier stock by using Multimin on a regular basis.” Two challengers from each of the four rounds will be selected and go on to compete in the finals with the winning challenger chosen by a panel of expert judges. In addition a national “People’s Choice” winner from the eight finalists will be chosen by the public and awarded a further six month supply of Multimin. This first round will also see local producer Brett Shepard of Kybybolite, SA participate and share his journey and results using Multimin in his livestock operation. Brett is a fourth-generation farmer at Mullinger Park, Kybybolite in South Australia’s South East. Brett’s property is just over 1000 hectares, of which he runs 2000 commercial ewes for prime lamb production, 1300 stud ewes (Poll Dorset, White Suffolk and Suffolks) and their replacement ewe weaners along with 500 young stud rams. Brett’s home block is where he concentrates on organic cropping program and produces organic golden linseed, organic matika oats and organic hay, with the occasional paddock of sub clover and lucerne hay put in on the stud block. “I’ve read a fair bit about this mineral injection,’ says challenger Brett, “but up til now I haven’t had the opportunity to really study the benefits from up close. I’m looking forward to seeing how it performs.” Brett’s aim, participating in the Multimin Challenge, is to achieve his goal of becoming industry leaders with his ram and lamb production, Brett hopes that Multimin will assist with greater lambing percentages, stronger lambs at birth, faster growth rates and all-round stock nutrition. Participants are encouraged to share their journey online via the dedicated Multimin Performance Ready facebook group, where interested farmers can follow the challenge and also read more about each of the challengers: facebook.com/groups/multimin The first round of participants may have already been chosen ­– but the challenge remains open for applicants hoping to compete for places in rounds two, three and four. Anyone interested in winning the experience of a lifetime tailored to their professional development and farming system, plus 12 months’ worth of Multimin is invited to apply at www.multiminchallenge.com. About Multimin Virbac's Multimin Injection is a trace mineral top up that rapidly increases trace mineral levels in cattle and sheep for use during high demand periods. Providing selenium, copper, manganese, and zinc at strategic times of the production cycle has been shown to improve livestock health and fertility, thus optimising livestock productivity. Ends Media Enquiries: Kyleen Partridge - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kyleen.partridge@c7even.com.au Please note profile introductions of each challenger are also available along with. SUPPLIED PHOTO CAPTION: This first round will see fourth-generation farmer Brett Shepard from Mullinger Park, Kybybolite in South Australia’s South East, participate and share his journey and results using Multimin. Lockdown for less 2020-04-01T23:23:07Z lockdown-for-less The Editor, Dear Editor, Calling 2020 a tough year would be like calling coronavirus a dastardly illness. Don't we know it? Every day, new announcements about health restrictions bring about job loss, financial hardship, and put further strain on a welfare system struggling to accommodate the sheer number of Australians in need. While we all navigate this uncertain time, there are small changes we can make in our households to ease the financial burden of COVID-19, while also helping the world at large. Eating vegan foods is the simplest way to keep our kitchens stocked for quarantine, especially when we have to be mindful with spending. Creamy, vitamin-fortified vegan milks can last for months in the pantry, as can grains, beans, and tinned vegetables. Grab some frozen vegies and fruits from the shop, and you can avoid the supermarket for weeks at a time, while meeting all of your family's nutritional needs. If baking cakes and cookies helps to ease the coron-anxiety right now, it’s cheaper and easier to bake with vegan ingredients: Use ground flaxseeds, applesauce or mashed bananas instead of eggs, and vegetable oil instead of butter. Eating thriftily doesn't just help our bottom line: It will drastically help our planet. Studies have found that if all of us went vegan, we would see food-related greenhouse gas emissions reduced by 70% by the year 2050. We would also save scores of animals from a life of isolation, physical and emotional suffering, and a torturous death. Aleesha Naxakis Media Officer PETA Australia PO Box 20308, World Square Sydney NSW 2002 aleeshan@peta.org.au 0403 721 428 While we suffer at home 2020-03-31T04:24:19Z while-we-suffer-at-home The Editor, Dear Editor, All our certainties are suddenly unreliable. While emergency workers risk their lives for us, most of us are stuck at home, anxious for our loved ones, and worried about our lost income and whether we can still feed the family. We wash our hands, binge watch the news or streaming services, and wash our hands again. But perhaps COVID-19 will give us an opportunity to rethink some things we take for granted. While we are suffering anxiety and discomfort, let’s take a moment to empathise with the terrified animals who are torn away from their families, kept in tiny cages, deprived of everything they enjoy, and brutally killed, simply because humans like the taste of their flesh or secretions. Animals like chickens, cows, sheep and pigs value their lives just as we do, and suffer when confined without any of the comforts we can obtain. And not only does animal agriculture kill billions of animals every year, and is a leading cause of climate change, but it is also a breeding ground for the viruses and bacteria that cause pandemics. Our suffering during these weeks or months is necessary and temporary. Theirs is routine and will continue for as long as we subsidise it through our grocery expenditure. That’s why caring people are opting for tasty vegan foods rather than animal-based ones. Going vegan is the sensible thing to do for your health, and the well-being of others. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Derby local is 1 of 12 selected for Round 1 of the national Multimin Performance Ready Challenge 2020-03-31T03:16:18Z derby-local-is-1-of-12-selected-for-round-1-of-the-national-multimin-performance-ready-challenge Animal health company Virbac Australia is excited to announce the first challengers to take part in the 2020/2021 Multimin Performance Ready Challenge (MPRC) – a 12-month program that will see up to 75 Australian farmers experience firsthand the benefits of trace mineral management at high demand production times in sheep and cattle. The company has reported receiving an overwhelming response from top-quality beef, sheep and dairy producers, all hoping to take part. Following the selection of 13 entrants to the first round, each challenger will be guided by veterinarians and livestock nutrition experts, while also working closely with their local Virbac representative, as they use their supplies of Multimin to test the effects on animal fertility, health and ultimately their financial bottom-line. Challengers will then go into the running to win an overseas trip for two to the USA tailored to their professional development and farming system, plus a 12-month supply of Multimin. Second and third runners up will also receive six months of free Multimin. Round one challengers have been named as Ben Pender – Bairnsdale, VIC, Peter Fort – Byaduk North, VIC, Debbie Geddes – Mudgegonga, VIC, Rosie Davenport – Derby, TAS, Bill Mitchell – Aberfoyle, NSW, Tim Reid – Roslyn, NSW, Tim Phelan – Clarence Town, NSW, James Burge – Cootamundra, NSW, Adam Coffey – Miriam Vale, QLD, Colin Burnett – Julia Creek, QLD, Rodney Blanch – Manango, QLD, James Morris – Narrikup, WA and Brett Shepard – Kybybolite, SA – and as Dr Jerry Liu, Multimin Marketing Manager explains, “this is a fantastic opportunity for our first challengers to gain expert support from some of Australia’s most experienced animal experts as they hone their operations.” “I’ve read a fair bit about this mineral injection,’ says challenger Brett Shepard, from Kybybolite, South Australia “but up til now I haven’t had the opportunity to really study the benefits from up close. I’m looking forward to seeing how it performs.” Two challengers from each of the four rounds will be selected and go on to compete in the finals with the winning challenger chosen by a panel of expert judges. In addition a national “People’s Choice” winner from the eight finalists will be chosen by the public and awarded a further six month supply of Multimin. Rosie Davenport from Derby in Tasmania spoke of her reaction to the news. “I’m very excited to be included in this year’s Multimin Challenge,” she says. “I am looking forward to receiving advice from the Multimin experts on how to raise healthier stock by using Multimin on a regular basis.” Rosie and husband Alan operate two dairies, milking 750 cows, increasing to 850 for the 2020 season. The 800-hectare property also supports 260 predominately angus breeders, with young stock reared to 600kg, as well as mixed cropping, including potatoes, poppies, parsley and lavender. The farm goal is to provide a secure future for our family and staff, while being environmentally sound and having great animal health. As stocking rates have increased, we have problems with immunity, fertility and lameness due to suboptimal mineral levels. Multimin is proving to be a vital part of the solution. Participants are encouraged to share their journey online via the dedicated Multimin Performance Ready facebook group, where interested farmers can follow the challenge and also read more about each of the challengers: facebook.com/groups/multimin The first round of participants may have already been chosen ­– but the challenge remains open for applicants hoping to compete for places in rounds two, three and four. Anyone interested in winning the experience of a lifetime tailored to their professional development and farming system, plus 12 months’ worth of Multimin is invited to apply at www.multiminchallenge.com. About Multimin Virbac's Multimin Injection is a trace mineral top up that rapidly increases trace mineral levels in cattle and sheep for use during high demand periods. Providing selenium, copper, manganese, and zinc at strategic times of the production cycle has been shown to improve livestock health and fertility, thus optimising livestock productivity. Ends Media Enquiries: Kyleen Partridge - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kyleen.partridge@c7even.com.au Please note profile introductions of each challenger are also available. SUPPLIED PHOTO CAPTION: This first round will see local dairy operator Rosie Davenport of Derby, TAS, participate and share her journey and results using Multimin. What's 'essential' about racing? 2020-03-25T02:00:42Z whats-essential-about-racing The Editor, Dear Editor, The COVID-19 pandemic has left us all worried and frightened, but one news story also leaves us gobsmacked – the announcement that horse and greyhound racing will remain in business. While all non-essential services and sports have closed down, it is inexplicable that these two exploitative entertainment businesses are allowed to continue to torment animals. Several media exposés have proved that animals used for racing are victims of an industry that is rife with cruel treatment, drug abuse, injuries and race fixing, and for many, their careers end in terror at the abattoir. The Coronavirus should shut down these vile industries immediately. Their history of whipping horses and baiting greyhounds, as well as the vile way animals are killed after they stop making profits, should shut them down forever more. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au The final Easter Show 2020-03-14T01:03:22Z the-final-easter-show Dear Editor, Next month's Easter Show has been cancelled, due to concerns about the proliferating coronavirus. It should remain cancelled in the future, and not just for health reasons. The Show does its best to deceive children and even adults who attend, by presenting an idyllic but inaccurate picture of how farmed animals are confined, tormented and killed. People see a handful of well-groomed animals that, temporarily, avoid the routine cruelty experienced by farmed animals. For the millions of others (and many of the ones being shown, when they return to the farm), profit is the only concern governing their lives, and suffering the only fate awaiting them. People attending the Show usually have no idea that, in NSW, the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act (1979) section 24 specifically excludes "stock" animals from most of its provisions. Yet the Show leaves children with the fantasy that all animals are treated with kindness and respect. When children are invited to "pat a chick", they are not told that it is standard procedure for millions of male chicks to be discarded by being minced alive or suffocated because they don't lay eggs. Nor that pigs are confined in tiny cages until slaughter. Cows have their babies torn from them within hours of birth so that humans can steal their milk. Lambs may be "mulesed" (have skin sliced from their hind-quarters) and later are often brutally beaten during shearing. Animals bred for their meat are slaughtered while still little more than babies. Of course, none of this is disclosed at the "Show". The government should permanently close down this marketing deceit and instead educate kids about the living nightmare animals endure before ending up on our plates. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Would you like virus with that? 2020-03-12T13:39:11Z would-you-like-virus-with-that The Editor Dear Editor, With the World Health Organisation (WHO) confirming we're in the midst of a pandemic – along with taking the Department of Health steps to safeguard our own health – it’s time we face the link between viruses like COVID-19 and humanity's flesh fetish. Human demand for meat means that huge numbers of animals, such as chickens and pigs, are crammed together on crowded, faeces-ridden farms, transported in filthy trucks, and slaughtered on killing floors soaked with blood, urine, and other bodily fluids. Pathogens flourish in such conditions, making factory farms a breeding ground for new strains of dangerous bacteria and viruses. Public health experts believe the coronavirus originated at a live-animal market and according to the US Centers for Disease Control, more than 75% of emerging diseases originate in animals. In this way, COVID-19 is similar to other infamous coronaviruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). All three spread from other animals to humans. Likewise, swine flu originated in pigs and bird flu in poultry. The best way to prevent future pandemics is to shift away from animal agriculture. We can do this by avoiding meat like the plague, and instead opting for healthy, humane vegan meals. Sincerely, Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Adviser PETA Australia PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney NSW 2002 (08) 8556 5828 mimib@peta.org.au Upcoming events lift the bar on weaner profitability for farmers 2020-03-11T03:10:09Z upcoming-events-lift-the-bar-on-weaner-profitability-for-farmers Coming to Tumut on Monday 16th March, Young on Tuesday 17th, Gunnedah and Dubbo on Wednesday the 18th March, Farmers will have the opportunity to discover practical tips and advice covering: - The latest industry research & findings in weaner health & wellbeing - Best practice for the weaning of cattle - Strategic choice and use of worm and liver fluke drenches to deliver production benefits, especially in young cattle Speaking at all events will be Elders Livestock Production Manager, Adam Turnball and Virbac Australia Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager, Dr Matt Ball who will cover weaner management to ensure farmers are getting the highest performance out of their young stock through optimal weaner management programs and best practice parasite control. Virbac Senior Product Manager, Tiago Carmona said “This is set to be an incredibly valuable opportunity for beef producers to gain insight from two of the industries leading authorities on optimising productivity and profitability in beef operations” he went on to say, “I know both Matt and Adam are looking forward to sharing these insights to support Australian beef farmers in improving their weaner management this Autumn.” While each event is free to attend, rsvp is recommended. “We expect all events to be very popular,” says Tiago, “so for anyone interested, it’s a good idea to RSVP with your local participating Elders store so you can secure your spot.” Interested attendees can call their local participating Elders Store to reserve a place: Elders Tumut on 6947 1544 Elders Young, Jason Bennett on 6381 3300 Elders Dubbo on 6883 1800 Elders Gunnedah 6748 3000 or Luke Wiggan 0447 653 900 WHAT: Virbac & Elders Road Show – Lifting the Bar on Weaner Profitability WHEN and WHERE: TUMUT NSW Monday 16th March, commencing at 6:30pm at the Oriental Hotel Tumut. To find out more, or RSVP, please contact Elders Tumut on 6947 1544. YOUNG NSW Tuesday 17th March, at 10:00am at The Elders store, 232 Boorowa St, Young. To find out more, or RSVP, please contact Jason Bennett, Elders Young on 6381 3300 DUBBO NSW Wednesday 18th March, commencing at 8:00am at the Elders Dubbo Branch, 37 Bourke Street. To find out more, or RSVP, please contact Elders Dubbo on 6883 1800. GUNNEDAH NSW Wednesday 18th March, at the Elders Gunnedah Branch, 15 Mullaley Road, at 5:00pm. To find out more, or RSVP, call Elders Gunnedah 6748 3000 or Luke Wiggan 0447 653 900. Media are invited to attend the event and interview: - Elders Livestock Production Manager, Adam Turnball - Virbac Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager, Dr Matt Ball - Representatives from Elders and Virbac Australia - Local farmers in attendance - ENDS - Media enquiries: Kyleen Partridge, C7EVEN Communications 02 6766 4513 / 0467 612 224 kyleen.partridge@c7even.com.au Adam Turnball Bio: ADAM TURNBULL ELDERS LIVESTOCK ANIMAL PRODUCTION ADVISOR Adam has over 19 years’ experience in the livestock industry. He owns his own Brangus herd and has a passion for working with his clients to develop early weaning programs which aim to improve herd productivity and results. Adam is extremely passionate about the rural industry and most importantly, its profitability. He has extensive experience working with veterinarians, nutritionists and farmers to achieve the highest outcomes possible, especially in the area of young stock management. Through his role at Elders, Adam has developed livestock production performance programs for his clients focussing on disease prevention and management whilst lifting the bar of profitability & production on farm. He is a firm believer that Animal Health Programs must not only consider vaccination and parasite control programs, but also practical and provide the highest returns for his clients. Dr Matt Ball Bio: DR MATT BALL VIRBAC SENIOR LIVESTOCK TECHNICAL VETERINARIAN Dr Matthew Ball is a veterinarian, Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager at Virbac Animal Health and the owner of Beacon Veterinary Surgery. Matt has 20 years’ experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. Throughout his career, Matt has worked in various roles including clinical practice, government and industry. He has undertaken post graduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, Matt is based on the northern rivers of NSW. Photo credit: Adam Turnball, Elders Livestock Production Manager Dr Matt Ball, Virbac Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager Coronavirus: How Pest Control Industries are handling this Outbreak by Marks Pest Control? 2020-03-06T08:16:03Z coronavirus-how-pest-control-industries-are-handling-this-outbreak-by-marks-pest-control Before telling the role of pest control company, let us first know some of the basic facts about COVID-19. Coronavirus is a zoonotic disease that means animals transmit it to Human beings. There are many questions related to this novel disease that are still unanswered like “what is the reason behind spreading of this virus?”, “What is the origin of the coronavirus?” are still not answered. Some of the Chinese based researchers think that Pangolin- a scaly mammal that eats ants has spread this virus to humans. Also, people claim that “Bat” is the carrier of Coronavirus. But they do not directly spread the disease. There is intermediary animal civet cat and dromedaries camel that carries the virus SARS and MERS respectively to humans. The specific source of this disease is yet not identified.  COVID-19 has firstly shown its worst reaction in Wuhan in China. After that, it is quickly spreading in other states. Currently, 86 countries are fighting against this novel disease. Some of the measure cases are reported from South Korea (6,284), Italy (3,858), Iran (3,513), Germany (545), USA (232). It is also affecting the financial economy of the country. The export and import of products and articles is restricted from the affected countries that have a direct impact on the financial market.  Numbers Related with Coronavirus. Total Number of Infected Cases: 98,424 Death Caused: 3,386 Recovered Cases: 55,640 Common Signs of Coronavirus There are a few symptoms that appear after 2 to 14 days of COVID-19 infection. Fever Cough Shortness of breath How Coronavirus Get Transmitted? It is a quickly spreading disease that gets spread by the following reasons. It gets spread by person to person.  When an infected person sneezes or has a cough, the droplet may affect other nearby people. If a person gets in contact with the infected object or place.  Prevention is the Medicine of Coronavirus(COVID-19). The number of infected cases are growing rapidly, but still, there is no effective vaccine for its treatment. In that scenario for protecting oneself from the virus, it is essential that you should follow all the preventive measures to be safe from this virus. Maintain a proper distance of 6 feet between yourself and other people. Try to avoid public or social gathering for some time. Wear a mask while you are travelling. Keep your body part sanitized. Do not make any contact with the infected person. Rest at home when you are sick. Make use of tissue while coughing and sneezing and dispose of it properly.   Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds before taking a meal, after using the washroom and then use sanitizer with 60% alcohol-induced.  If you feel fever, difficulty in breathing and sneezing issue, then immediately visit a doctor.  Don’t touch your mouth, nose, and eyes frequently.  For providing the more in-depth knowledge to Australian Citizens, Mr. Mark, the owner of Mark’s Pest Control, is also appealing to people to take effective precautions to be safe from Coronavirus. At the present time, to be free from virus infestation, you should leave in a pest-free environment. As there is no specific reason behind this virus generation and no proper vaccine is available, the only effective thing is the precaution. Call a professional pest control today to get your space checked against disease-causing pests.  About the Company Mark’s Pest Control is a #1 leading company of pest control service providers in Australia that has the head office in Melbourne, Victoria. We are proudly serving in Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia, from past many years. We have expert technicians that deal with all kinds of pests. We provide pest inspection and control services at a reasonable price.  There are a number of satisfied customers with us. We deliver our service 24X7 even on public holidays and weekends. Trust us and get pest free life.   Contact Information Marks Pest Control Melbourne, VIC, 3000, Australia Contact - 0433791074 2020 Surfing Dog Championships Photos Now Available 2020-03-02T04:39:39Z 2020-surfing-dog-championships-photos-now-available First official photos from the 2020 VetShopAustralia Surfing Dog Championship  held yesterday (1 March) at Noosa First Point are now available.  For a preview visit:  https://www.facebook.com/vetshopaustralia/photos/?tab=album&album_id=3767014910005502 For more hi-res photos and videos,  and permission to reprint/republish, please contact us.  Crimes and Falsifications 2020-02-29T11:31:47Z crimes-and-falsifications Dear Editor, Following yet another PETA Asia undercover investigation of the Australian wool industry, a sheep shearer has pleaded guilty to cruelty to animals at Horsham Magistrates' Court. Video footage shows the worker punching frightened sheep, stamping and standing on their heads and necks, and beating them on the face with heavy electric clippers. This is the 13th investigation of the global wool industry that PETA's international affiliates have undertaken since 2014 and the fifth in Australia, where the initial exposé resulted in the world's first-ever cruelty-to-animals convictions of sheep shearers. The wool industry called that case a "wake-up call" and promised to change. However, in 2015 and again in early 2017, eyewitnesses saw exactly the same types of abuse as before. In late 2017, the wool industry again condemned such cruelty and vowed once more to do better – but the pattern of abuse just continues. The latest evidence was gathered by an eyewitness who worked for two contractors in 16 shearing sheds in South Australia and Victoria. Workers struck terrified sheep in the face with sharp metal clippers, cut them up and stitched up their gaping wounds without any pain relief, and then hurled them out of the sheds. Two sheep died from conditions that workers called "heart attacks", likely resulting from stress during shearing. Others were dragged into the sun and left without water or care for hours before they died. Farmers also cut the necks of unwanted sheep, apparently while they were still conscious. PETA and our international affiliates have now documented cruelty to sheep at 116 operations on four continents. There is only one way this rampant and gratuitous cruelty will ever end – if you see a label that indicates wool in a shop, please don't buy the item. Sincerely, Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Strategist People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002 (08) 8556-5828 Ducking for cover 2020-02-26T13:15:53Z ducking-for-cover Dear Editor, Native ducks are struggling to survive, with climate change, catastrophic fires and drought affecting their habitats. Surveys have shown that the wetlands are in long-term decline. So it’s baffling why the government would approve a duck shooting season this year, even with a reduced season and smaller killing limit, which the Game Management Authority has admitted is impossible for them to police. Every year, hundreds of thousands of birds are blasted out of the sky. For each bird killed, another is wounded and will die slowly in terror and agony. Ducklings are dependent on their mother for their first two months, and will die of cold, starve, or be eaten by predators if their mother is shot. Let’s not pretend this is sport or done for food – it is sheer sadistic amusement. We should all be calling on our MPs to reverse this outrageous decision. It’s time for duck shooting to be banned in Victoria outright. At the very least, this year's season must be cancelled. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia 1a Henderson St Northcote, VIC 3070 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au