The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-09-19T00:18:36Z Parasite management roadshow tours Ballarat offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-19T00:18:36Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-ballarat-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Ballarat in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Ballarat event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Jim Gaylard from Trawalla, described his local event as “a good reminder on the advantages of early weaning and the importance of worm control in young stock. It emphasized the importance of maintaining pastures and worm burdens in younger animals. We’ve been using Cydectin Long Acting injection in our sheep for quite some years and we will now use it in our weaning program to keep our cattle worm free for 120 days and our pastures cleaner.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Ballarat on-farm demonstration Ballarat event attendees Parasite management roadshow tours Mortlake offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T22:43:04Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-mortlake-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Mortlake in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Mortlake event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Mick Fitzgibbon from “Clogheen” described his local event as “a great opportunity for young and old to learn about best practice weaner management and animal health. As an older person in the industry, it’s always good to see these types of events so that the next generation of cattle producers can get an idea on best practice today. We’ve used Cydectin Long Acting injection for over 3 years to reduce our worm burden in our weaned calves and heifers that have just calved and we are very happy with the results we’re seeing.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Mortlake on-farm demonstration Parasite management roadshow tours Mt Gambier offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T04:56:17Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-mt-gambier-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshows last stop was in Mt Gambier in South Australia on Friday 13th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Mt Gambier event presentation covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Cameron Milich from “Coola Station”, Kongorong described his local event as “a very informative presentation especially when you’re there with other producers to bounce ideas off each other. We will endeavor to introduce these learnings into our weaning program and start using Cydectin Long Acting injection to give our weaners longer protection against worms.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Mt Gambier event attendees: Cameron Milich, Stephen Fisher from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac and Darcie Kuhl from Elders Parasite management roadshow tours Victoria & South Australia offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T00:31:20Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-victoria-south-australia-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Bairnsdale, Yea, Euroa, Kyneton, Ballarat, Mortlake, Hamilton, Coleraine and Mt Gambier last week. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The events on-farm demonstrations and presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Raelene Mold from “Barina”, Yea described her local event as “a good reminder of the importance of using the right products at the right time to get my weaners to their target weights quicker, and the importance of mineral supplementation with vaccinations. Keeping up with new product developments and having access to experts at these types of events is key to me getting the right information, ensuring I have the correct protocols in place to continue to produce a quality product to the market. Sometimes just having the reassurance that I am doing the right thing is all that is needed, you can never stop learning in this industry and that's why these events are so crucial to my learning.” Beef producer Craig Grant from Lindsay Murray Greys, Coleraine described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn about controlling worms at critical times. A lot of the time we can get stuck in seminars covering the theoretical side of things, so it was good to have a hands-on component of this event. We have been looking for a long acting product that is potent and persistent to control our worm burdens at critical times of the year and we are interested in the results Cydectin Long Acting injection will give us. We hope to reduce our worm burdens and take the stress out of animals during the colder months which is when they are challenged the most.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Yea event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Raelene Mold from Yea, Rob Inglis from Elders and John Purvis from Elders. Coleraine on-farm demonstration Coleraine event presentation Parasite management roadshow tours Coleraine & Hamilton offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-15T23:52:24Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-coleraine-hamilton-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Coleraine & Hamilton in Victoria on Thursday 12th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Coleraine & Hamilton events included an on-farm demonstration and presentations on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Craig Grant from Lindsay Murray Greys, Coleraine described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn about controlling worms at critical times. A lot of the time we can get stuck in seminars covering the theoretical side of things, so it was good to have a hands-on component of this event. We have been looking for a long acting product that is potent and persistent to control our worm burdens at critical times of the year and we are interested in the results Cydectin Long Acting injection will give us. We hope to reduce our worm burdens and take the stress out of animals during the colder months which is when they are challenged the most.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Coleraine on-farm demonstration Coleraine event presentation Hamilton event attendees - Rob Inglis, Andrew Mibus, Rod Evans and Dr Matthew Ball Parasite management roadshow tours Kyneton offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-12T03:52:56Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-kyneton-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Kyneton in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Kyneton event presentation covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Dave Bassett from Lindley Property, Kyneton described his local event as “a great opportunity to hear from the experts about best practice weaner management. I have only ever used Cydectin Long Acting Injection for my sheep, so it was interesting to hear how to use it for my cattle to increase live weight gain.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Kyneton event: Dave Bassett from Lindley Property, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Rob Inglis from Elders, Adam Mitchell from Virbac and Michael Ellis from Elders. Parasite management roadshow tours Yea & Euroa offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-10T22:27:55Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-yea-euroa-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Yea and Euroa in Victoria on Tuesday 10th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Yea and Euroa event presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Raelene Mold from “Barina”, Yea described her local event as “a good reminder of the importance of using the right products at the right time to get my weaners to their target weights quicker, and the importance of mineral supplementation with vaccinations. Keeping up with new product developments and having access to experts at these types of events is key to me getting the right information, ensuring I have the correct protocols in place to continue to produce a quality product to the market. Sometimes just having the reassurance that I am doing the right thing is all that is needed, you can never stop learning in this industry and that's why these events are so crucial to my learning.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Yea event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Raelene Mold from Yea, Rob Inglis from Elders and John Purvis from Elders. Parasite management roadshow tours Omeo & Bairnsdale offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-09T22:54:00Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-omeo-bairnsdale-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow kicked off at Omeo and Bairnsdale in Victoria on Monday 9th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Omeo and Bairnsdale event presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Jill Hill from Hinnomunjie, Victoria described the Omeo event as “a great opportunity to have so much knowledge and expertise in the one room all together. I have taken away new practical knowledge to improve our farm’s weaning processes in particular how to use strategic products such as Cydectin Long Acting to improve heifer weight and health for optimal joining outcomes.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Omeo event: Rhys Kennedy from Bairnsdale Elders, Rob Inglis from Elders, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Matthew Grylls from Virbac and Jill Hill from Hinnomunjie. Bairnsdale event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Rob Inglis from Elder, Rosamarie Stewart from Glenshields Pastoral Company, Debbie Hammond from Mitchell Valley, Rhys Kennedy from Elders, Chris Stewart from Glenshields Pastoral Company, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac and Brendon Tice and Emi and from Elders. Fence offence 2019-09-06T01:31:18Z fence-offence To The Editor, Neighbours don't always get along, unfortunately, but one case is being reported across the nation and around the world simply because a vegan is involved. A spat at Girrawheen in Perth has ended up in the Supreme Court, and the person who complained about her neighbours for smoking, cooking fish near the fence, and making noise is facing major harassment. Thousands of people indicated they would accept an invitation on social media to attend a cookout outside her home, at which dead animals would be barbecued in order to offend her. Comments on Facebook included such erudite threats as "[s]omeone should go round and bitch slap some sence [sic] into the vegan idiots". This was clear and undeniable harassment, incited on a carriage service. Yet the federal government is deafeningly silent, despite recently proposing a law to protect farmers against "individuals who use a carriage service, such as the internet, to incite another person to trespass, damage, destroy or steal property". Vegans reject the violence of branding, castration, and dehorning as well as the terrifying death billions of animals endure each year just to satisfy some humans' desire for the taste of flesh. They also reject the devastating environmental damage, including climate change, caused by animal agriculture. Yet those who march animals into abattoirs to be strung up so that their throats can be cut open are protected by special laws. It seems there is one law for those who (legally) abuse animals and another for those who refuse to harm other sentient beings. Sincerely, Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Race carnage 2019-09-01T11:40:38Z race-carnage Dear Editor, This week, two young female jockeys died after falls, one at Cranbourne in Victoria and the other in Darwin. Horseracing's continuing bloodbath continues to shock and horrify even those who profit from it. A former jockey who had to retire with brain damage after a fall in 2014, in which another rider was killed, wrote that "sometimes the price of this industry seems too high". And humans are not the only victims of this vile industry. On average, one horse will die on Australian racetracks every three days. Why all this carnage? To entertain and extract money from the public. Racing is a business, and racehorses and jockeys their raw materials. Racehorses regularly suffer from injuries, lameness, and exhaustion. Horses are whipped and forced to run at break neck speeds and may be given painkillers, muscle relaxants, and anti-inflammatory drugs to keep them running. All this leads to falls, broken legs and death. Any death on the racetrack is tragic and unnecessary. But at least jockeys have the choice to be involved. For most of the horses, except for the tiny minority who win big money, there is no choice but a cruel, painful, and untimely death. Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay, NSW 2481 +61 411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Vegan kids 2019-08-27T23:47:50Z vegan-kids Dear Editor, It's tragic to see any child's health put at risk, particularly by his or her parents. The recent high-publicity case in which two parents in Sydney were found guilty of letting their daughter become malnourished is but one example among many in which children's dietary needs have been neglected by their parents. In a staggering number of cases that go unreported, parents feed their children unhealthy foods – to the point that over a quarter of Australian children are overweight or obese – and fail to provide them with the recommended quantities of vitamins, minerals, and fibre. Sensational headlines aside, the child in this case was malnourished not because one parent was vegan but because of what the judge called "the abandonment of parental responsibility". Obviously, parents must give their children nutritious food in adequate quantities and ensure that they're reaching developmental milestones, and it's very easy to do this as part of a balanced vegan lifestyle. Indeed, thousands of conscientious parents have raised or are currently raising healthy vegan children. The Australian National Health and Medical Research Council states in its dietary guidelines, "Appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthy and nutritionally adequate. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the lifecycle." Vegan foods, which are cholesterol-free, generally low in saturated fat, and rich in complex carbohydrates, protein, fibre, and other nutrients, are optimal for children. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine points out that most kids' diets are lacking not in animal-derived foods but rather in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant-based foods that have protective effects against the world's top killers, including heart disease. We owe it to our children to teach them healthy eating habits and ensure they receive adequate food. When children raised on an abundance of healthy fruits, vegetables, pulses, and grains become old enough to learn the truth about the appalling suffering of animals in the meat, egg, and dairy industries and the toll these industries take on the environment, they'll thank us for bringing them up vegan. Sincerely, Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Adviser People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Australia PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney NSW 2002 (08) 8556 5828 CWA starting a Sconversation about women’s mental health 2019-08-26T00:34:27Z cwa-starting-a-sconversation-about-womens-mental-health Hi The Country Women's Association (CWA) of NSW is ready for the start of its annual Awareness Week campaign for 2019, which kicks off on September 1. The theme for this year's Awareness Week is women’s mental health issues and support services in country NSW, and how all of us can help make a difference, with the CWA using its ‘tea and scones’ reputation for an important community appeal. CWA members are urgining everyone to 'Start a Sconversation' this Awareness Week, a morning or afternoon tea with friends where the social interaction is the main focus. “The CWA of NSW has long been a supportive social network for women so the power of a Sconversation – boil the jug, sit down and enjoy a cuppa and a chat – is well known. It’s the chance to talk about how you’re feeling in a safe and supportive environment, and ask for assistance should you need it. For those who are listening it’s an opportunity to offer support and some advice if you think it’s required,” said CWA of NSW President Stephanie Stanhope. “Maintaining strong mental health – and finding support services – is challenging enough in country communities where the ‘tyranny of distance’ is very real. The drought is just another factor they’re dealing with at present. It’s never been more important to Start a Sconversation with your friends. Too many people are still suffering in silence, and that’s something we can all start doing something about." Attached is a media release on Awareness Week, and for interview inquiries or more information, please let me know. For information on events in your local area, please get in touch with your nearest branch. With more than 370 branches around the state and 8000 members - across regional NSW, Sydney and Newcastle - a CWA branch is never too far away. Kind regards, Kylie Galbraith Seftons Tamworth NSW 2340 Ph. 0411 480 208 Collaboration with Rockhampton school launches trial to support agriculture’s leaders of tomorrow 2019-08-23T04:31:02Z collaboration-with-rockhampton-school-launches-trial-to-support-agricultures-leaders-of-tomorrow Leading global animal health company Virbac Australia’s new collaboration with The Rockhampton Grammar School has just launched, with a trial conducted at Belmont Research Station on Wednesday 21st August. Designed to assist Year 11 students in determining the impact of internal parasites and managing drench resistance in cattle, the school has been working with Virbac Australia to conduct a product evaluation trial testing different worm treatment methods. The trial has involved administering and monitoring 200 head of cattle, split into four groups and treated with different products, before being monitored over the next 84 days. The results should demonstrate which products work best to keep down worm count and boost weight gain, with the data then being available for students to analyse and be assessed on as part of their Certificate 3 curriculum. It’s envisaged that the project should help determine the importance and impact of worms in Central QLD. With drench resistance being a current hot topic for producers, this trial is designed to continue the conversation about cattle drench resistance, and further investigate whether north Australian producers should be concerned about worms in their cattle. As Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball explains, “this is a unique working collaboration to support students in becoming industry experts and future leaders in Australia’s agricultural sector. We’re pleased to be able to highlight some of the key issues surrounding internal parasites for the students as well as hopefully shed light on best practice worm control practices for the wider region of central QLD.” For Rockhampton student Henry Gray the trial has so far been a great opportunity to learn more about what’s becoming an increasingly important issue for QLD farmers. “This trial is important to the agricultural industry as it will help us improve our productivity and how we manage the resistance of worms and other parasites. I look forward to gaining more knowledge of controlling parasites so that I can implement new practices my own property to improve production.” Student Sara Schottelius also spoke of her experience being part of the unique new collaboration: “I hope to gain new knowledge that I can take home to my own property to improve how we control parasites. This trial is important for the agricultural industry to help us gain new information about the best methods to combat key issues in cattle productivity.” For additional information about the trial, contact Dr Matthew Ball at matthew.ball@virbac.com Ends MEDIA CONTACT Kate Munsie, 0421 935 843 ABOUT VIRBAC AUSTRALIA Virbac (Australia) Pty Ltd is a specialist animal health company, with its core business in sheep and cattle products, veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines, a wide range of petcare products for dogs and cats, plus a broad range of products for horses. Virbac Australia’s 2015 sales turnover was more than A$120 million. In Australia, Virbac employs around 260 personnel, all of whom are passionate about animal health. Virbac offers an injectable product called Multimin, designed to top-up important trace minerals (manganese, zinc, selenium and copper) in cattle. The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed to beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms. Strategic mineral supplementation is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth, resulting in significant improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability. Photo captions: Virbac’s Territory Sales Manager Victor Moffroid leading a product demonstration Students from The Rockhampton Grammar School take part in product application methods Why stop at humans? 2019-08-20T12:32:51Z why-stop-at-humans Dear Editor, August 24 is marked around the globe as World Day for the end of Speciesism. Speciesism is an ideology that considers the lives and interests of most animals as insignificant, just because they are of a different group to humans. Any injustice is intolerable, and is likely to encourage further discrimination. The great writer and theologian C.S. Lewis wrote that it is only sentiment that lets us sacrifice other species for the often-trivial benefits of our own. Moreover, he warned, if we let mere preference based on similarity justify cruelty, then "why stop at humans?" Discrimination based on sameness is at the core of racism, nationalism, and any other form of discrimination that sees the suffering of others treated as less important than our short-term gains. Just as the dismantling of racism or sexism does not diminish the privileged but rather lifts up everyone, so the end of speciesism will transform our relationships not only with other animals, but with our fellow humans. Because, as Isaac Bashevis Singer said, "as long as human beings will go on shedding the blood of animals, there will never be any peace." Desmond Bellamy Special Projects Coordinator PETA Australia PO Box 2352 Byron Bay NSW 2481 0411 577 416 DesmondB@PETA.org.au Sin tax on meat 2019-08-15T05:50:23Z sin-tax-on-meat Dear Editor, Pacific Leaders are appealing to Australia to do something about greenhouse emissions. Our own children are striking to protest inaction. But what can we do? A new research report suggests that meat could be targeted for higher taxes, given the industry's role in climate change, deforestation and animal cruelty. Fitch Solutions said "the global rise of sugar taxes makes it easy to envisage a similar wave of regulatory measures targeting the meat industry". The idea is taking off in Europe, where German politicians are voting to remove the VAT discount on meat. A report in the scientific journal The Lancet estimated that reducing meat consumption would result in the prevention of more than 11 million premature deaths each year, cutting of greenhouse gas emissions and preservation of land, water and biodiversity. The report added that unhealthy diets currently cause more death and disease worldwide than unsafe sex, alcohol, drug and tobacco use combined. We tax sugar, tobacco and alcohol based on the damages they cause to people’s health, and we should tax meat accordingly. But reducing meat consumption will also lessen the appalling cruelty of the meat industry, where many cows are branded with hot irons, their horns are cut or burned off, and males’ testicles are ripped out of their scrotums – all without pain relief. It's time – to tax meat or better still, ban it altogether. Mimi Bekhechi Campaigns Strategist People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (Australia) PO Box 20308 World Square Sydney, NSW, 2002. (08) 8556-5828