The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-03-24T21:52:22Z Industry expert-led Liver Fluke roadshow concludes following NSW tour 2019-03-24T21:52:22Z industry-expert-led-liver-fluke-roadshow-concludes-following-nsw-tour Two industry experts have recently wrapped up a roadshow across NSW designed to highlight the importance of controlling two-week old fluke in sheep, beef and dairy production and the emerging problem of chemical resistance. Ms Jane Kelley, PhD Candidate, Department of Animal, Plant and Soil Sciences and Dr Matthew Ball, Technical Services Veterinarian at Virbac Animal Health toured regional NSW towns earlier this month to share their expertise and help cattle producers address liver fluke disease among their cattle. The roadshow covered everything from the latest global and local findings to new testing methods, how to build a FlukeKill program and how to integrate a fluke treatment with best-practice worm treatment – making it an invaluable forum for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of control methods for optimal cattle production. Beef and sheep producer Tony Overton was one of the farmers who attended the Walcha seminar. “We’ve always been very vigilant when it comes to these issues in sheep, but we’ve never looked at it being a major issue for cattle, even though we knew it was coming,” he said. “This seminar highlighted the three different application methods, with good explanations of the pros and cons of each, which was of great value to me. I found it very helpful to learn the science behind the best methods for controlling parasites and fluke in our cattle.” Beef producer Bill Mitchell said he attended the Armidale seminar because “we know we have issues with fluke and realise we should be doing more about it. It was great to hear from the experts and get reacquainted with the whole fluke issue – and it was also useful to make contact with the best people to help us. We already use Virbac products, and while our resellers often guide us with how and when to use the products, it’s good to hear a wider range of information on the topic. We will be seeking Virbac’s help as we implement a fixed program to help us run the farm more efficiently.” Virbac Australia’s Fluke Product Manager David Yang described the roadshow as a great success. “With autumn heralding the start of liver fluke season, now’s a critical time for graziers to address the disease among their cattle. Jane and Matthew have presented some really invaluable information to Australia’s industry professionals and cattle producers, and this has been a unique opportunity to learn the latest in fluke management from the experts. We hope it’s helped to inform Australian farmers on the best practices to safeguard their livestock and minimise the impact of this challenging disease.” Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Virbac Australia Fluke Roadshow Seminar Virbac Australia Representatives (Emma Dodd, David Yang, Matthew Ball, Jane Kelley) Trace mineral trial continues to deliver compelling data to support its efficacy 2019-02-27T06:16:22Z trace-mineral-trial-continues-to-deliver-compelling-data-to-support-its-efficacy Seven livestock producers are currently competing in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, designed to test the livestock benefits of Multimin, an injection used to top up trace minerals in sheep and cattle prior to high demand periods. Led by animal health company Virbac Australia, the 12-month program will highlight the effects of the mineral injection, delivering real results by real producers. The challengers are competing to be crowned the Multimin Challenger King or Queen – and it will be the public who will ultimately decide the winner when voting opens online in April. The winner will be announced in May 2019 and awarded an ‘experience of lifetime’ prize, specifically tailored to their farming system. The latest challenger to reveal their results is Victorian challenger Renee Murfett, who together with husband Alister operates two dairy farms in Framlingham, Victoria. Their 145-hectare “Springlea” property has 220 Friesian Red Dairy milking cows, while their second 183-hectare farm “Merton Park” has 250 Friesian Red Dairy cows. Renee’s goal has been to increase the immunity, health and productivity of her calves. With five heifers previously lost due to broken legs, Renee’s stock were believed to have suboptimal levels of trace minerals – making Multimin’s animal health program a great opportunity to see the impact of the trace mineral supplement on livestock health and performance. As part of the trial, 210 animals (105 treated and 105 untreated ‘control’ animals) were used to assess improvements in immunity, indicated by a reduction in disease and with the potential for improved growth. The treated group were given Multimin 4 in 1 trace mineral injection for cattle at 1mL/ 50kg at birth, and again at weaning (around 12 weeks of age), and data was collected relating to incidence of scours or disease, presence of illness or death, growth rate and general health. Renee observed some marked differences between the two groups at key stages of development. “The first signs appeared very early on,” she reports. “At just four days of age, we found that only the non-treated calves developed scours. Then by day seven, we began to see visual improvements in the Multimin-treated calves, which had darker, shinier coats compared to the non-treated animals.” Renee’s mentor Dr Susan Swaney explains the significance of that finding. “The coat is an indicator of how well the skin and other physical barriers are. These being the first line of defence, animals with healthy skin and mucous membranes are less likely to be invaded by disease,” she explains. “Improved immune function means improved future productivity, and this type of program while calves are undergoing a growth phase and developing muscle, cartilage and bone will ensure they’re given the best possible start to life.” Renee also observed that when calves were transitioned onto hard feed, stock from both groups developed scouring – but while some of the control animals went off their feed for two to three days, the Multimin-treated animals continued to feed well. As Susan explains, “we know the importance of the trace minerals in Multimin in the development of all stages of the immune system. Optimisation of trace elements at critical time points can provide better disease protection and in some cases improved weight gains, to give young animals the best beginning at what is a critical time in development.” To find out more about how Multimin can improve your livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Farmers can also follow the trials at www.multiminchallenge.com - Ends - Contact: Kate Munsie, C7EVEN Communications, 0421 935 843 / 02 6766 4513 Photo caption: Renee Murfett with mentor Dr Susan Swaney Renee’s Multimin treated calves Industry expert-led Liver Fluke Roadshow set to tour NSW 2019-02-25T05:50:21Z industry-expert-led-liver-fluke-roadshow-set-to-tour-nsw Autumn means liver fluke season, so right now is a critical time for graziers to address liver fluke disease among their cattle. Around six million cattle graze Australian pastures where liver fluke is endemic*, and although it’s been a dry summer, experts warn cattle producers not to become complacent in the lead up to Autumn and consider the best strategies to protect their livestock. Next week, two industry experts will kick-off a roadshow across NSW to highlight the importance of controlling two-week old fluke in beef and dairy production. Ms Jane Kelley, PhD Candidate, Department of Animal, Plant and Soil Sciences and Dr Matthew Ball, Veterinarian, Technical Services Veterinarian at Virbac Animal Health will tour regional NSW towns from March 4 - 13 to share their expertise. It’s being described as a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of control methods for optimal cattle production. Jane completed an Associate Degree in Environmental Horticulture at the University of Melbourne, a Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Science with Honours, at La Trobe University and is currently completing a PhD. Based at Melbourne’s Centre for AgriBioscience, her research focuses on the epidemiology and management of liver fluke parasites in cattle. Jane has been quantifying the prevalence of liver fluke and drug resistance on dairy farms in Victoria, and is now optimising liver fluke control strategies. “My aim is to increase the productivity and profitability of cattle industries by reducing the detrimental impacts liver fluke has on production, weight gain and fertility in Australian cattle,” she says. Matthew has 18 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles, with jobs in clinical practice, government and industry. He has undertaken post-graduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs. “We’ll be presenting nine seminars on the roadshow, which will cover the latest global and local findings, new testing methods, how to build a FlukeKill program and how to integrate a fluke treatment with best-practice worm treatment,” says Matthew. “We’re really looking forward to sharing our knowledge, and helping both producers and vets to take the necessary steps to safeguard livestock.” “We’re excited to be hosting Ms Kelley and Dr Ball,” says Virbac Australia’s Fluke Product Manager David Yang. “They’ll present some really invaluable information to Australia’s industry professionals and cattle producers, and this is a unique opportunity to learn the latest in fluke management from the experts.” Please note: this is an invitation-only event. Please contact your local Virbac Australia representative or your local Virbac merchandise store for more information on how to attend. Seminar itinerary: Date Location Time Monday, 4th March Glen Innes Services Club 6pm Dinner provided. Tuesday, 5th March Armidale Golf Club, Armidale 7am. Breakfast and refreshments provided. Wednesday, 6th March Walcha Veterinary Supplies, Walcha 7.30am. Breakfast and refreshments provided. Thursday, 7th March Hill & Crofts CRT, Blayney 8.30am. Breakfast provided. Thursday, 7th March Orange Duntryleague, Orange 6:30pm. Food and refreshments provided. Friday, 8th March Elders, Cowra 8am. Refreshments provided. Monday, 11th March Adelong Services & Citizens Club, Adelong 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Tuesday, 12th March The Services Club, Braidwood 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Wednesday, 13th March Bombala Golf Club, Bombala 5pm. Food and refreshments provided. Ends * NSW Government Department of Primary Industries; March 2017, Primefact 446, fourth edition. Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Ms Jane Kelley Dr Matthew Ball Virbac Australia announces the winner of their latest Cydectin LA testimonial competition 2019-02-22T00:39:40Z virbac-australia-announces-the-winner-of-their-latest-cydectin-la-testimonial-competition-1 With internal parasite infestation being the single most important disease faced by Australia’s red meat producers, animal health company Virbac Australia recently decided to run a testimonial competition across social media to discover the impact of their parasite product Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle on farms around Australia. The product is known for its unbeatable potency and persistency, and it provides the longest protection available against a range of internal and external parasites, including worms – but rather than just take Virbac’s word for it, the manufacturer asked Cydectin LA users to tell their own stories on their Facebook page. Customers were asked to share how the product improved productivity and profitability, saved labour and helped heifers and weaners to reach optimal weight earlier. One entrant would be the lucky winner of a Leicht's Stockman Pro-Chute worth $7,000, while the store with the winning entrant would also receive a donation of $1,000 to go to a nominated local charity. In addition, everyone who entered won a free pack of Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle. Virbac Australia recently announced the overall winner as cattle grazier David Ross from Wollomombi, east of Armidale, NSW, and he was recently the delighted recipient of a brand new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute. David summarised his experience using Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle as follows: “We began using Cydectin LA in our weaners 4 years ago. We wean around 500 head in March every year and we immediately noticed the difference LA was making. We were no longer seeing any wormy cattle in mid-winter and the visual difference in our weaners with no tail present was a very obvious benefit. Since using LA we have been getting our replacement heifers to joining weights quicker, this product has been great for our business.” GrazAg Armidale was announced as the winning store, with Virbac Australia donating $1,000 to their chosen charity, BackTrack. The charity enables young people who have lost their way to reconnect with education and training, become work-ready and secure meaningful employment. The youth they work with are mostly rural males aged 12 to 19 who have multiple and complex challenges in education, health, justice, housing and employment. BackTrack helps these young people to get back on track by developing strong, happy and healthy foundations that result in positive life pathways and full participation in their communities, and Virbac Australia is proud to be able to contribute to this worthwhile cause. When it comes to a parasite management program, Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball says that Autumn is always a strategic time to control cattle parasites such as worms and ticks. “Numbers of parasites are often at a high level and a highly effective Autumn drench will not only remove the current parasites but reduce overall paddock contamination. An Autumn treatment with Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle will strategically reduce the risk from highly contaminated pastures and avoid the need for repeat drench treatments. Autumn use of Cydectin LA can often be timed to a pre-weaning or weaning time drench.” Matt continues, “Independent research has proven that single strategic use of Cydectin LA in growing stock will lead to much higher productivity than multiple short acting drenches. The vaccine is changing the approach to the control of worms and cattle ticks in Australia. Used strategically, the product can deliver improved productivity, animal welfare, labor efficiency and resistance management.” To find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA, farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Cydectin LA testimonial winner, David Ross with his new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball Virbac Australia announces the winner of their latest Cydectin LA testimonial competition 2019-02-21T23:44:21Z virbac-australia-announces-the-winner-of-their-latest-cydectin-la-testimonial-competition With internal parasite infestation being the single most important disease faced by Australia’s red meat producers, animal health company Virbac Australia recently decided to run a testimonial competition across social media to discover the impact of their parasite product Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle on farms around Australia. The product is known for its unbeatable potency and persistency, and it provides the longest protection available against a range of internal and external parasites, including worms – but rather than just take Virbac’s word for it, the manufacturer asked Cydectin LA users to tell their own stories on their Facebook page. Customers were asked to share how the product improved productivity and profitability, saved labour and helped heifers and weaners to reach optimal weight earlier. One entrant would be the lucky winner of a Leicht's Stockman Pro-Chute worth $7,000, while the store with the winning entrant would also receive a donation of $1,000 to go to a nominated local charity. In addition, everyone who entered won a free pack of Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle. Virbac Australia recently announced the overall winner as cattle grazier David Ross from Wollomombi, east of Armidale, NSW, and he was recently the delighted recipient of a brand new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute. David summarised his experience using Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle as follows: “We began using Cydectin LA in our weaners 4 years ago. We wean around 500 head in March every year and we immediately noticed the difference LA was making. We were no longer seeing any wormy cattle in mid-winter and the visual difference in our weaners with no tail present was a very obvious benefit. Since using LA we have been getting our replacement heifers to joining weights quicker, this product has been great for our business.” GrazAg Armidale was announced as the winning store, with Virbac Australia donating $1,000 to their chosen charity, BackTrack. The charity enables young people who have lost their way to reconnect with education and training, become work-ready and secure meaningful employment. The youth they work with are mostly rural males aged 12 to 19 who have multiple and complex challenges in education, health, justice, housing and employment. BackTrack helps these young people to get back on track by developing strong, happy and healthy foundations that result in positive life pathways and full participation in their communities, and Virbac Australia is proud to be able to contribute to this worthwhile cause. When it comes to a parasite management program, Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball says that Autumn is always a strategic time to control cattle parasites such as worms and ticks. “Numbers of parasites are often at a high level and a highly effective Autumn drench will not only remove the current parasites but reduce overall paddock contamination. An Autumn treatment with Cydectin Long Acting for Cattle will strategically reduce the risk from highly contaminated pastures and avoid the need for repeat drench treatments. Autumn use of Cydectin LA can often be timed to a pre-weaning or weaning time drench.” Matt continues, “Independent research has proven that single strategic use of Cydectin LA in growing stock will lead to much higher productivity than multiple short acting drenches. The vaccine is changing the approach to the control of worms and cattle ticks in Australia. Used strategically, the product can deliver improved productivity, animal welfare, labor efficiency and resistance management.” To find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA, farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Cydectin LA testimonial winner, David Ross with his new Leicht’s Stockman Pro-Chute Virbac Technical Services Manager Matt Ball Cattle fertility, conception and weight gains revealed by latest Multimin Performance Ready Challenger 2019-02-05T02:12:30Z cattle-fertility-conception-and-weight-gains-revealed-by-latest-multimin-performance-ready-challenger South Australian farm manager Craig Brewin has announced the latest round of results from the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program run by animal health company Virbac Australia. The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge has given seven Australian farmers the chance to experience first-hand the benefits of Multimin trace mineral injection. Challengers receive 12 months of free Multimin product and a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors. With each challenger sharing their program results and experiences, Craig has been paying particular attention to how Multimin contributes to increased fertility, conception and weight gain, supported by expert advice from mentor Dr Colin Trengove, Vet, University of Adelaide lecturer, and Managing Director of Pro Ag Consulting. Operating from Maranoa Downs, 20km west of Naracoorte SA, Craig runs predominately Angus cows, which are joined to Wagyu bulls to produce feedlot-entry cattle. After running multiple trace element tests on cattle of various age groups over the years, Craig discovered ongoing issues with cobalt, selenium, copper and manganese deficiencies in many of his animals. Under the guidance of Multimin mentor Dr Colin Trengove, Craig decided to trial the effects of Multimin on the general health and weight gain of his calves. Craig explains how the trial was conducted. “We treated 50% of our calves with Multimin at marking and weaning and plan to treat the same calves again 3 months post weaning. The other 50% were left untreated and used as a control mob. When comparing the weights of the treated and untreated steers in August 2018 and again in January 2019, and we found a modest weight gain advantage in the treated steers. Although weight gain increases are not always attributed to trace minerals, it is possible that Multimin helped improved the immune function of the steers, and hence provided them with a better opportunity to grow. Unquestionably, the general appearance of the treated calves has also improved, and it’s clear from this result that Multimin’s impact on immunity gave our steers an additional means to grow and gain weight.” For Dr Trengove, the benefits of the Multimin program are clear. “Adequate nutrition including trace minerals are integral to the development of muscle, cartilage and bone during the growth phase in calves,” he says. “There are numerous studies that confirm the critical role that trace minerals play in immunity for growing calves. Collectively, they show that the immune system can be enhanced through the use of trace mineral supplements such as Multimin, leading to better disease protection and additional weight gain.” Outside of the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge Craig ran a second test focusing on the effects of Multimin on fertility. “In this trial, heifers with their first calf at foot were treated with Multimin and Webster’s 5 in 1 B12 in early May (pre-calving) and then treated with Multimin again in August at calf marking (pre-joining). Our bulls were also treated with Multimin before joining. The heifers were joined over an eight-week period, and it was recorded that out of the 127 head joined, 122 fell pregnant. This meant a 96% conception rate, which is phenomenal,” Craig says. “Using Multimin in conjunction with Websters 5 in 1 B12 has proved highly effective. Generally, it’s quite challenging to get our heifers rearing their first calf back into calf, so I’m very happy with these results.” To find out more about how Multimin can improve livestock performance, contact your local stockist on 1800 242 100. Interested farmers can sign up for continuing updates on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge at www.multiminchallenge.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Craig’s Multimin treated Angus cows Craig Brewin with mentor Dr Colin Trengove Virbac Australia releases end-of-year findings from its national trace mineral challenge. 2018-12-17T05:21:46Z virbac-australia-releases-end-of-year-findings-from-its-national-trace-mineral-challenge As the year draws to a close, animal health company Virbac Australia has collected all available data on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program which invites seven Multimin challengers to share their learnings as they reveal the benefits of Multimin, a trace mineral injection for livestock. From beef producers in Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania, to a dairy producer in Victoria and a Poll Merino breeder in the Southern Tablelands of NSW, Virbac’s challengers have being trialing Multimin’s effects. The trial has explored improvements in areas like conception rates and immunity, body conformation, carcass weight and characteristics, incidence of diseases, growth rates and conception times. With the assistance of expert mentors, challengers have received 12 months worth of free Multimin product and a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors. Each program is aligned to each challenger’s goals and ultimately their bottom line, and challengers have been sharing their program results and experiences online at www.multiminchallenge.com. State by state, some of the key highlights include: QLD: Multimin treated heifers have shown an improved immune response to leptospirosis – and results also showed that animals treated with Multimin and 7 in 1 had higher levels of protection. QLD challenger Don McConnel reports that “animals given Multimin had higher mean antibodies to leptospirosis. On visual appraisal, the animals that have been treated in heifer groups also look in noticeably better condition.” Mentor Matt Ball says that “it’s been great working with Don at Mt Brisbane. We are studying conception rates, immunity, and growth and development responses to trace minerals, and we’ve seen very positive results suggesting that animals treated with Multimin and 7 in 1 had higher levels of protection, with on average higher antibodies to leptospirosis. Heifers also seem to be growing better, with a healthier appearance in the treatment group.” WA: When pregnancy-tested in October, challenger Ryan Willing saw above 90% conception in both groups, with the Multimin-treated animals slightly ahead. Challenge mentor Enoch Bergman reports seeing “fantastic results with Ryan’s cattle. Multimin has proven its worth in this instance and reinforced the importance of investing for the future.” VIC: Multimin played a greater role in supporting calves during their first 12 weeks, says challenger mentor Dr Susan Swaney, who reports that “the Multimin Challenge has given people who have never tried it the chance to see how it performs on their property, and we’ve seen some really great results. We certainly saw differences within the first 12 weeks. The treated calves didn’t seem to suffer from the usual gastric signs that the untreated herd had at the time of weaning. Multimin helped with the adjustment to weaner rations, and they went straight on to the new diet without any issues.” NSW: Challenger mentor Dr Elizabeth Bramley describes Multimin’s impact on sheep weight and carcass characteristics: “The focus of trace mineral supplementation has developed beyond merely correcting deficiency symptoms to strategic mineral supplementation, which is aimed at the optimisation of reproductive performance, immune function and growth. This strategic approach can better support improvements in productivity and subsequently profitability.” Next year will bring further results for the Multimin challenge. Data due early in 2019 will include weight measurements and MSA grading in steers, pregnancy-testing cows, calving distribution, liver testing, worm egg counts and conception rates. All these factors will influence the performance of livestock and ultimately enhance producer profitability. Challengers are excited to see the longer-term results as they begin to calculate the cost benefit analysis for producers. Dr Jerry Liu, Livestock Nutrition Product Manager at Virbac Australia summarises the impact of those results: “Previous trials have shown that Multimin is able to improve the performance of livestock in these areas. If this is replicated for our challengers, it will have a significant impact on their bottom line.” Judged by both challenge mentors and the public, the winner will be announced in May 2019 and awarded an ‘experience of lifetime’ prize, specifically tailored to their farming system. Exciting results of the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge will be announced in March 2019. To find out more about how Multimin can improve your livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Interested farmers can also sign up for continuing updates on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge at www.multiminchallenge.com About Multimin Virbac's Multimin Injection is a rapidly absorbed source of trace minerals, which can bypass the rumen for direct uptake into the blood in eight hours. The active ingredients are needed for the body to produce two important antioxidants involved in protecting the reproductive and immune systems. For cattle, it is available as a four in one formulation containing copper, selenium, manganese, and zinc. For sheep producers, it is available with or without copper. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: QLD Multimin Challenger, Don McConnel’s Heifers Enoch Bergman and Tony Murdoch Preg-testing at Ryan Willing's, WA Charles Darwin University is the latest to take part in national trace mineral challenge 2018-12-03T02:31:22Z charles-darwin-university-is-the-latest-to-take-part-in-national-trace-mineral-challenge Charles Darwin University (CDU) is expected to announce livestock pregnancy improvements from participation in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program run by animal health company Virbac Australia. The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge gives seven participants the chance to experience first-hand the benefits of Multimin’s trace mineral injection, with assistance from expert mentors. Challengers receive 12 months of free Multimin product and a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors – and they’ll also be in the running to win the experience of a lifetime, specifically tailored to their farming system. With each challenger sharing their program results and experiences, Charles Darwin University’s Katherine Rural Campus trial site is the latest to take part. Based 16 km north of Katherine, the site is managed by Jessica Di Pasquale, Alison Haines and Noah Taylor, who together operate a Brahman stud and Brahman/cross breed commercial herd from an on-site farm and stud at the University’s training facility. Their goals are to increase fertility, conception and productivity and improve immunity and health, under the expert guidance of Multimin mentor Dr Amanda Dunn from Katherine Veterinary Care Centre. As part of the trial, 92 non-pregnant adult cows have been assigned one of two treatment groups at random, and have been given either Multimin or no Multimin (control herd) four weeks before bulls were introduced in November. In March 2019, all trial animals will be pregnancy-tested, and the resulting data will measure each cow’s pregnancy status, foetus age and animal weight to determine the effect of Multimin trace minerals. As Jessica explains, “Multimin injection has been scientifically proven to top up trace minerals, and we’re looking forward to seeing the results. We’ll be sharing our observations over the coming months – and as previous field trials have proven that breeders treated with Multimin have significantly higher conception rates earlier in the calving season, we’re expecting to see improved conception at first cycle from these latest trials.” Dr Jerry Liu, Livestock Nutrition Product Manager at Virbac Australia described the Multimin Challenge as an “extraordinary opportunity for farmers to learn more about animal nutrition. Trace minerals are essential elements for healthy sheep and cattle, and we know that during high demand periods such as joining, weaning and birthing, animals have higher requirements for certain trace minerals. This is sure to be a fascinating study into the effects of a new strategic approach for optimal performance management.” The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge is also part of Virbac’s ongoing commitment to animal health education, with the company supporting students who have a desire to work in agriculture and rural operations in a number of different ways. Through working with CDU on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, the company encourages school leavers to get involved in agriculture and rural operations through Agricultural Training Colleges to become an ag specialist or prepare for jobs in rural and regional sectors. In addition, WA mentor Enoch Bergman recently gave five young vets from Murdoch University hands-on experience with preg-testing and the chance to learn more about the Multimin Challenge – and Virbac also takes in 2-3 students per year, providing invaluable work experience to help nurture Australia’s next generation of agricultural specialists. To find out more about how Multimin can improve livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Interested farmers can also sign up for continuing updates on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge at www.multiminchallenge.com/signup/. About Multimin Virbac's trace mineral injection Multimin 4 in 1 for cattle delivers a balanced ratio of four trace minerals, including selenium, copper, manganese and zinc – while Multimin 3 in 1 injection for sheep and cattle contains selenium, manganese and zinc, bypassing the rumen for direct uptake through the blood in eight hours. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Amanda Dunn and Jessica Beckhouse Charles Darwin University Brahman Cattle Lucky Guyra farmer James Stewart named winner of Virbac Australia’s Tridectin® Platinum Ticket promotion 2018-11-09T04:40:38Z lucky-guyra-farmer-james-stewart-named-winner-of-virbac-australias-tridectin-r-platinum-ticket-promotion Guyra sheep producer James Stewart was one of the first farmers in Australia to purchase Tridectin, the latest sheep drench from Virbac Australia that’s being heralded as a huge break-thru in the fight against worms. Tridectin is the world’s only broad-spectrum combination drench with a registered claim to kill triple-resistant and monepantel-resistant worms. As a result, it provides a reliable, safe and effective worming solution that guarantees healthier, more productive sheep. On opening his pack, James received an extra special surprise. To celebrate Tridectin’s launch, Virbac has been running a special ‘Platinum Ticket’ promotion – and James was one of three lucky winners to find a platinum ticket, which were randomly placed inside the first ever batch of Tridectin. James has won himself a pair of Samsung Gear VR Goggles (as featured in the Tridectin TV commercial) – and Virbac will also be donating $500 to local charity Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service, as nominated by James. Virbac Australia Sheep Product Manager Terrance Laughlin had this to say on James’s win. “This has been a really fun and engaging way to mark the launch of Tridectin. A big well done to James. We hope he’ll get just as much pleasure from using his VR Goggles as he will from seeing the benefits of Tridectin on his animals’ health.” Ends For more information contact: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au QLD Graziers pair up with Virbac Australia to host informative field day 2018-11-07T00:01:40Z qld-graziers-pair-up-with-virbac-australia-to-host-informative-field-day Mt Brisbane Droughtmaster graziers Don and Andrea McConnel are set to host a field day on November 17. Don McConnel is competing in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12 month program run by Virbac Australia that sees seven farmers experience first-hand the benefits of injectable trace minerals with the assistance of expert veterinarian mentors. Mr McConnel said he is looking forward to hosting a field day to give local graziers the opportunity to speak with key company representatives and to trial trusted cattle health products. “The event will cover information on drenches, fly tags and ID tags as well as give fellow graziers the opportunity to trial cattle injectable products that I’ve had fantastic results with on our property,” Mr McConnel said. “I have been fortunate to be selected to compete in the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge and am excited to share my observations so far.” Held from 9.30am on Saturday 17 November 2018, expert guest speakers will cover tick management, chemical use and rotation, fly tags, NLIS and ID tags and insights on the differences Don has seen in his Multimin treated cattle v a non-treated herd. Speakers include Virbac Technical Services Veterinarian Dr Matt Ball, South East Country Veterinarian Dr Bill Roughan, Anthony Feez from Y-TEX, Trevor Wilcox from Zee Tags and Don McConnel. Mr McConnel would like to extend a warm invitation to media to attend this event, and will, of course, provide opportunities for interviews with key stakeholders. What: Multimin Challenger Field Day When: 9.30am on Saturday, 17 November 2018 Where: “Mt Brisbane”, Mt Byron Road, Crossdale QLD 4312 Media Opportunities: Interview and photograph opportunities with: Key speakers Virbac representatives Attendee representatives Click here for further information. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Multimin Challenger Don McConnel NSW sheep grazier trials innovative methods to combat drought 2018-10-30T22:46:06Z nsw-sheep-grazier-trials-innovative-methods-to-combat-drought A NSW sheep grazier has just revealed the details of a new animal health program he’s recently implemented to boost livestock performance in the face of the state’s recent and widespread drought. Farmer Alex Willson and his wife Steph run ‘Kalaree Poll Merino’, a stud in the Southern Tablelands region of NSW. They breed fine/medium Poll Merinos over three properties– yet challenging weather conditions have forced the drought-affected farmer to take new steps to ensure the survival, welfare and profitability of his stock. “Currently we are experiencing a very dry year with just under half of our annual rainfall” says Alex, “and so we’ve implemented a range of measures to combat these difficult conditions and keep our animals alive.” Alex explains how the first of these measures, the introduction of lick feeders, has already had an impact. “Instead of trail feeding, we’ve invested in feeders to give our ewes and growing lambs consistent access to grain, which is a ration of wheat and buffer pellets. Since doing that, we’ve seen a decrease in mis-mothering, a consistent condition score in our ewes, an improvement in milking, and generally better health in both lambs and ewes.” Following advice from Delta Agribusinness agronomist James Cheetham, Alex has planted highly productive grazing crops including Ascend Ryegrass, grazing wheat and Hyola 970 Canola. “These varieties have been better able to make use of what little rain we’ve had this year, providing targeted grazing to carry us through the worst parts of the drought and importantly add value to our business by finishing stock at record prices”. Alex also made the decision to move away from cross-breeds and focus primarily on merinos. “For us it’s about increasing our scale as a single enterprise. Moving to an all merino ewe base enables us to take advantage of their wool and meat production – and we avoid seasonal vulnerabilities and getting caught having to carry ewes and lambs through winter. We also made the decision to sell our cows which has proven a wise move due to the ongoing dry.” He explains how the introduction of a nutritional supplementation program (developed by Matthew Hallam of Landmark) has played an important role in maintaining animal health. “We’ve added AD&E pre -lambing, a starch based loose lick high in calcium and magnesium, and a starch based lick for lambs on grazing crops to improve rumen function.” In addition, Alex is also running his own trial with Multimin trace mineral injection, as part of the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program run by animal health company Virbac Australia. The trial gives a group of seven farmers, including Alex, the chance to experience first-hand the benefits of Multimin injection, with assistance from expert mentors. Challengers receive a tailored nutrition program developed by leading industry mentors – and each challenger is sharing their Multimin program results and experiences on social media (#multiminchallenge), with a winner announced in May 2019 as judged by the challenge mentors and public. Under the supervision of Cooinda Vet Hospital vet Dr Elizabeth Bramley, Alex is currently treating 355 of 710 lambs with Multimin 3 in 1 trace mineral injection for sheep, with the other half used as a control group. After a first treatment in September, they’ll be weighed again next month prior to processing, to measure average weight gain of treated v untreated lambs. Alex is looking forward to gaining greater insight into the effects of using Multimin. “This is set to be a very informative trial, and I’m proud to be a part of this study”, he says. “We’re hoping that Multimin can effectively increase the immunity and production of our lambs, and that we’ll see an increase in weight gain triggered by greater overall health.” Virbac Product Manager and nutritionist Dr Jerry Liu is eager to see the upcoming results. “When used strategically during periods of high demand, Multimin has been shown to optimise fertility and immunity in livestock. However, formally trialing the product in such challenging drought conditions on a real, well-managed property will provide a lot of scientific insight for the future. We should always seek best practice and look for innovative ways to face some of the challenges we have in livestock. The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge is a unique opportunity for innovative graziers like Alex to observe the benefits of following a program like this.” As Jerry explains, Multimin contains three trace minerals that aid in reproduction and immunocompetence, via a balanced ratio of zinc, manganese and selenium that bypasses the rumen for direct uptake from the blood. Multimin is designed to ‘top up’ essential trace mineral levels during high demand periods, such as joining, lambing, weaning and for young growing stock. “Increasing optimal levels of trace minerals in young sheep will have an impact for the farmer’s profitability and return on investment,” he continues. “Multimin assists with improving animal health, and hence maximises their production potential. The Multimin Performance Ready Challenge has given Alex the opportunity to improve both livestock performance and ultimately his financial bottom line.” To find out more about how Multimin can improve livestock performance, contact your local stockist or Vibac on 1800 242 100. Interested farmers can sign up for continuing updates on the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge at www.multiminchallenge.com/signup/. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Alex Willson, NSW Multimin Challenger Dr Jerry Liu, Virbac Product Manager and nutritionist WA farmer finds strategic drenching is the key to cattle worm eradication. 2018-09-16T22:39:32Z wa-farmer-finds-strategic-drenching-is-the-key-to-cattle-worm-eradication Internal parasite infestation is the single most important disease faced by Australia’s red meat producers – and for Western Australia, the most damaging worm parasite is the brown stomach worm (Ostertagia ostertagi). Infestation is a particular issue for the region’s wetter south-western areas and on cattle-only properties, and with worms being present in most herds, they can dramatically reduce growth rates, especially in young cattle. The brown stomach worm is particularly prevalent during the winter months, with larvae numbers peaking between May and July. Following higher levels of autumn rainfall, eggs in freshly deposited dung can rapidly increase worm larvae, and the extra worm burden results in a check in growth rates and financially damaging production losses. Cattle showing symptoms of brown stomach worm have ‘ostertagiosis’, and its presence is often signified by symptoms like diarrhoea, reduced appetite and anorexia. With MLA estimates suggesting that effective control of Ostertagia can increase the sale weight of weaners by up to 60 kg[1], the eradication of worm parasites is clearly a financial concern, as well as being an animal health and welfare issue. Dr Matthew Ball, veterinarian of 18 years and Technical Services Manager for animal health company Virbac Australia describes some of the key measures farmers should undertake to prevent worm infection. “Firstly, it’s important to know which types of worms occur on your farm, and the seasons where they pose the highest risk, so you can arm yourself with the knowledge to more effectively combat worms on your property.” He also says that it’s important to regularly monitor the worm status of livestock, especially for higher risk stock like weaners during high risk seasons. Improving their nutrition will also make them better able to fight off a parasite infestation, he reveals. “Next, a quarantine drenching of all new arrivals should be an essential component of your biosecurity plan,” continues Matthew. “When you’re purchasing stock, it’s also a good idea to request an animal health statement. That way you’re clear on the stock vendor’s level of assurance concerning their disease status.” Good grazing management is key, and young animals (who are most vulnerable to worms) should be allocated the lowest contaminated pastures. Finally, he says, strategic drenches at key times of year can make a huge difference. For WA farmers Ryan and Elisha Willing, who run 2,500 hectares 130 km east of Esperance, strategic drenching has been pivotal in their efforts to eradicate worms. As Ryan explains, worms have been a particular problem for their livestock, and their perennial pastures have made their 900 Black Angus breeders and 900 calves more susceptible to ongoing issues with parasite burdens like worms. “Unfortunately, we have pretty much every kind of worm here,” says Ryan. After reading about Cydectin Long Acting Injection for Cattle six years ago, he immediately began using it as part of his strategic drenching program. “Initially I did a small trial with a control group, and I saw a significant growth rate difference. Since then I’ve used it across the board with all my stock.” The product is known for its unbeatable potency and persistency, and it provides the longest protection available against a range of internal and external parasites, including worms. No other endectocide can match Cydectin LA Injectable for lasting control of roundworms (protects for 112 days against Ostertagia), cattle ticks, lice and mites, all without influencing the development of immunity against worms. In an added bonus, Cydectin has no known effect on dung beetles, demonstrated to have no impact on larvae or adult beetle emergence – which means it contributes to cleaner pastures without impacting the role of this important agricultural ecosystem. Ryan describes how his property’s treatment program operates at key moments, twice per year, beginning during weaning in December, which Ryan says is when calves often pick up worms from their mothers. “They’re also going into a high-stress environment after weaning, so this is an important time to gain greater control over their health.” Essentially, treatment during this time prevents larvae developing to adult worms, and a single summer injection with Cydectin LA can greatly inhibit worm contamination. “We use head baling for Cydectin,” he reports, “which is perhaps a bit more time consuming than pour-on, but it’s really not that hard, just a simple injection behind the ear and you’re done.” Ryan’s livestock are again treated in May, as they move into winter. “This together with the first treatment in December is normally sufficient to protectthem through the entire 12 month cycle,” he says. “The best thing about Cydectin LA is that it offers a long-acting, long control period, which is very important for our young cattle, as that’s when they’re growing the hardest. They need all the help they can get at this time, particularly as they’re grazing on tight green pastures during summer.” Ryan says the results with Cydectin have been phenomenal. “We’ve seen fantastic growth rates in our young animals, and also great conception rates amongst our heifers. For me Cydectin LA is one very important part of the big picture – which is keeping the animals healthy, and keeping their growth rate optimal. Our animals just look healthier, their coats are shinier and that’s even been commented on by our suppliers and customers.” Treating for worms at the right time, with the right product will maximise the return on investment – so Virbac Australia recommends using Cydectin LA Injectable when conditions favour them most, particularly during wet conditions. For Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball, this kind of careful, considered approach is fundamental for success. “A strategic worm control program at key moments during the year will effectively reduce the impact of worms, eradicating them from cattle while also minimising the levels of infective worm larvae on pasture. It really is the best form of defense against this potentially devastating disease.” To find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA, farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Elisha and Ryan Willing Ryan Willing treating with Cydectin LA Injection for Cattle [1] The MLA Cattle Parasite Atlas (2005) QLD farmer uses tropical grasses to transform his pasture profitability 2018-09-09T20:00:00Z qld-farmer-uses-tropical-grasses-to-transform-his-pasture-profitability A QLD farmer has transformed his cane farm into a thriving cattle business using tropical grasses supplied by proprietary pasture seed company PGG Wrightson Seeds Australia (PGGWSA). Darryl Trimble and his wife Hannah are cattle graziers on ‘Emerson Park’, 26km South of Proserpine, QLD. Their property was previously a cane farm, but to improve enterprise profitability the couple decided to make the switch to cattle. Over the past seven years they have progressively stripped out their cane stocks using PGG Wrightson Seed products to replenish their pastures. The property’s challenging growing conditions made choosing the right types of crops essential. As Darryl explains, their soils are deficient in phosphorus, which can limit pasture growth and yields. In addition, their most recent winter has been the worst in nine years, with the farm suffering from unusually low temperatures and frost. And they were also plagued by sicklepod weeds, where seeds can remain viable for up to 10 years. For these reasons, the couple chose three tropical pastures from PGG Wrightson Seeds to use on their property – Mekong Brizantha, Cardillo Centro and V8 Stylo. Darryl says that “they were all planted for grazing purposes, and initially we mixed the Mekong together with V8, which worked very well. We also chose Cardillo because it’s a high-nitrogen crop that saves me putting nitrogen into the ground as fertiliser.” Darryl also decided to trial Envirogro, a seed treatment that removes the seed kernel from the husk, reducing weed seed and other waste material to improve the quality and flow during sowing. It’s ideal for tropical seeds, and the process can have a noticeable impact on germination and growth rates. Darryl reports exceptional pasture benefits from all three of his tropical pastures. “They’ve demonstrated a very fast strike rate, quick growth, impressive ground cover, and the weight gain in our cattle has been really good. In a very wet year, our cattle don’t tend to do great, but this year they’ve put on more weight than any previous year. Our most recent seven-month F1 Wagyu calves came in at over 200kg – and nutrition-wise they’ve looked great.” Darryl also found that his Mekong pasture proved more than able to handle a bit of waterlogging. “The volume of feed I get out of it is unbelievable, even in wet conditions. It’s a nice soft leaf, and we find that it’s optimised when cattle take the tops off, then we rotate and let them go back to it in about 5 weeks time.” The V8 has been a similar success story. “It’s proven to be fantastic at choking out weeds, and it’s very reliable during the dry season, producing an incredible amount of feed this year, and growing over seven feet high in some places.” Even Cardillo has been worth its weight in gold. “The Cardillo has been a great grower. We threw 1kg into an area approximately the size of a house, and it has now spread to the size of two football fields!” Darryl was also impressed by the results achieved with Envirogro. As he described, “the process has resulted in a better strike rate, plus the ants don’t eat the seeds nearly as much. I’ve also noticed that seedlings look a lot healthier when they come up.” For Darryl, there’s no doubt that introducing these types of grasses has resulted in a healthier, more profitable farm. “I’d definitely recommend these tropical grasses. I’ve had so many people comment that we should get more cattle, so we can fully capitalise on the large amount of feed we’ve got. That to me is a great sign that our feed program is thriving, and these grasses have given us fantastic results in what can often be a challenging growing environment.” PGG Wrightson Seeds agronomists can help farmers create custom mixes and blends to suit any situation. Please visit www.pggwrightsonseeds.com.au to learn more about their tropical seeds, and to find an agronomist in your area. - Ends - For media enquiries: C7EVEN Communications Kate Munsie, 02 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Darryl Trimble with his V8 Stylo crop V8 Stylo crop Control intestinal parasites before Summer hits, even in time of drought. 2018-08-30T03:46:39Z control-intestinal-parasites-before-summer-hits-even-in-time-of-drought Internal parasite infestation has been found to be one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. According to a recent MLA research project, it’s estimated that internal parasites cost the southern beef industry $82 million per year in lost productivity and treatment[1]. For beef producer Chris Croker, who runs a 2,000 acre property in NSW, the economic impact is all too evident: “Our Hereford cattle are more prone to parasite issues. Round worms and liver fluke are the two main parasites, and they’ve previously caused all kinds of problems with fertility and weight loss, which has impacted our bottom line.” For Chris and cattle producers across the southern beef industry, the most damaging worm species is the Small brown stomach worm (Ostertagia ostertagi), which can have a significant impact on growth rates, health, fertility and milk production by reducing appetite, even in animals that appear healthy. A particularly heavy infestation can cause damage to the fourth stomach, as well as diarrhoea, susceptibility to other diseases and even death. High worm burdens are likely to occur on farms with irrigation and in regions with high rainfall (more than 500-600mm), however drought effected areas can also increase the risk of internal parasites due to grazing behaviour. In dry conditions when there’s less forage to eat, cows will tend to eat the emerging grass next to dung pads which may be infested with larvae. Livestock grazing of short pastures, high stocking rates and set stock grazing situations can also create ideal conditions for worms. Worms can also be more prevalent in young animals, especially after weaning. In summer and autumn or during calving or nutritional stress, infection can lead to a higher risk of herd diseases like type 2 ostertagiasis. The infection risks for bulls are also higher, because bulls have lower immunity to gastrointestinal parasites than steers. And varying weather also plays a role, with hot, humid conditions being ideal for Barber's pole worm, while high winter rainfall can increase the prevalence of Black scour worm and Small brown stomach worm larvae. Virbac Technical Services Manager Susan Swaney describes the key indicators for identifying and diagnosing worms in cattle. “Farmers should look for a history of poor performance, with lower growth rates than expected based on known pasture availability and quality. There are also clinical signs, which can include scouring, weight loss and pale gums and membranes around the eyes, as well as weakness, lethargy or bottle jaw.” Nonetheless, worm faecal egg counts, larval cultures and blood tests for pepsinogen remain the best indicators of worm infection. Dr Swaney explains why. “Knowledge is power, so it’s really important to know which of the important worms types your farm is prone to, and to monitor the worm status of your younger animals regularly, especially during high risk seasons. That way you can be sure they’re eliminated if proven to be a problem.” Dr Swaney also suggests requesting an animal health statement when purchasing stock. “That way you’re clear on the stock vendor’s level of assurance concerning their disease status.” And “a strategic drenching program, which includes an effective quarantine drench of all new arrivals, is one more essential component of a successful farm management plan,” she adds. For beef producer Chris, non-chemical management methods mixed with Cydectin Long Acting Injection for Cattle are important. Chris highlights the benefits of Cydectin Long Acting Injection are two-fold: “I’ve used it since it came onto the market, mainly because of the longer-lasting results compared to other products I’ve tried. Its longevity means I’m often able to cut out any second round worm drench, especially for younger stock,” he explains. There are also advantages when it comes to performance. “There’s no doubt that Cydectin helps with weight gain when given strategically, because when an animal is worm-free, 100% of the nutrients are being used by the animal,” he explains. Using Cydectin Long Acting last spring, Chris reports that it contributed to a weight gain of perhaps as much as 30kg more across 100 days. “Essentially the end results as I see them are stronger weight gain, glossier coats and much better overall health… and that can obviously have a great impact when it’s time to sell the stock,” he adds. The treatment itself has been formulated to be effective against internal parasites like Barbers pole, small brown stomach worm, lung worm, hook worm and whip worm – and the results of recent trials indicate big gains for farmers who use Cydectin Long Acting. Field trials across 24 farms throughout Australia found that on average, cattle treated with Cydectin Long Acting Injection gained an extra 8 kg (10.5%) compared with those treated with doramectin injectable[2]. In an added bonus, the treatment has no known effect on dung beetles, demonstrated to have zero impact on larvae or adult beetle emergence. And while some farmers say that pour-on drenches are easier to administer, for farmer Chris the benefits far outweigh the nominal increase in labour time. “Administering this product in my view is not much different from giving an oral drench. It’s just a case of catching your stock in a head bale and injecting behind the ear. Perhaps a pour-on is easier, but for me they're less effective and so the results will be different.” Virbac Australia’s Dr Swaney has one last word of advice. “Make sure you’re feeding your animals, not their parasites. If you can treat when conditions favour worms or impact a herd’s ability to cope with infestations – especially during drought or times of restricted access to feed – the economic benefits can be significant.” Farmers are encouraged to talk to their local rural supplier to find out why there’s nothing like Cydectin LA. For more information, visit au.virbac.com. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Beef producer Chris Croker Virbac Technical Services Manager Susan Swaney Hereford cattle [1] MLA report B.AHE.0010 (2015). Priority list of endemic diseases for red meat industries. [2] Virbac (2016). Weaner productivity trials New trace mineral trial results indicate further gains using injectable supplement. 2018-08-22T04:12:28Z new-trace-mineral-trial-results-indicate-further-gains-using-injectable-supplement New trace mineral trial results indicate further gains using injectable supplement. WA cattle producer Ryan Willing has just revealed the latest findings from the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month trial currently being run by animal health company Virbac Australia. As part of the challenge, seven farmers are testing the livestock benefits of Multimin Trace Mineral Injection, supported by expert advice from a team of veterinary mentors. With the results shared on social media and digital channels, the trial is designed to show Australian beef, sheep and dairy producers how they can use the trace mineral injection to improve livestock performance. Trace mineral may also be referred to as trace element or micro mineral. Together with his wife Elisha, Ryan runs 900 Angus breeders east of Esperance, WA. As he explains, the region’s sand plains are nutrient-deficient, which affects the fertility, weight gain and overall health of their self-replacing-herd: “Our sandy soil leaches just about every nutrient available, so trace elements are the key to unlocking maximum production from our crops. Yet even after topping up nutrient levels to our pastures, I’ve already seen a massive additional benefit from using Multimin.” Ryan’s goal is to use Multimin to increase the fertility, conception rate and productivity of his animals. Guided by advice from mentor Dr Enoch Bergman, his herd has been split into two groups, in order to compare improvements in conception rates and timings. Group 1 has been treated with HyB12 + Cydectin Long Acting Injection, and group 2 with Multimin + HyB12 + Cydectin Long Acting Injection. Cows were treated in early June, four weeks prior to joining. They will then be pregnancy-tested five weeks after joining, in order to measure both conception rates and time of conception – both important markers of fertility and herd profitability. So far, early results indicate strong results for those cows treated with Multimin. Ryan describes how “even though our herd has relied heavily on supplementary feeding this past winter, the Multimin challenge trial cows are looking particularly good. Before I started using Multimin, my yearlings used to look brown and shaggy by the end of winter – but they’re keeping their shiny black coats, which is the first sign of good health. I hope that the next round of results will confirm my feeling that this injection is going to have a really positive impact on both their fertility levels and calving patterns.” Ryan has had previous positive experiences with Multimin. In 2017, treatment of Multimin four weeks from joining lifted the average conception rate in Ryan’s cows from 85% to 92% with a 9-week joining period. Ryan also saw weight gains in his steers by using a combination of Multimin and Cydectin Long Acting Injection as previous results have shown 1 kg/day average from weaning to spring sale. Ryan’s mentor Dr Enoch Bergman is a veterinarian at Swans Veterinary Services, with a particular interest in this field of study, having already sampled thousands of local animals in an effort to benchmark trace mineral status for targeted supplementation. He explains the importance of improving calving patterns in a self-replacing herd like Ryan’s. “Firstly, it is critical that calving aligns with optimal seasonal pasture availability, in order to maximize calf weaning weights, breeder’s lifetime fertility and the producer’s ability to capitalize on market opportunities. Our intervention doesn’t stop with choosing the best mating date, we must actively ensure that each breeding animal is given the best chance to fall pregnant each time she cycles. Cows which fall pregnant early in the mating program go on to calve earlier, and are therefore better prepared for their next mating, not only increasing their longevity within the production system, but also the weaned weight of their calves. Adequate micromineral levels are a key prerequisite to the optimisation of both the body condition score and plane of nutrition of each breeder, paramount to achieving the goal of a short fast calving season. Enoch actively advocates joining heifers for shorter periods and ahead of each producer’s older management groups. “If naturally mating, I advocate joining heifers for three weeks shorter as well as three weeks earlier than their cow mobs. This will buy the heifer more time after she calves to prepare herself for her second mating season.” Dr Bergman describes, earlier cycling and improved conception rates can be achieved by optimising health and growth through better nutrition. “For most of my clients, integrating a rapid trace mineral top up of zinc, manganese, selenium, cobalt and copper at weaning and again prior to mating will improve reproductive outcomes, as well as contributing to growth, a functioning immune system, and greater disease resilience, all leading to improved future fertility prospects.” And while variable/reduced feed intake, feed antagonists and low trace mineral absorption in the gut can all make oral supplements less effective, Multimin is able to effectively bypass these challenges, being an injectable rather than oral trace mineral. Dr Bergman also describes how the trace minerals found in Multimin can benefit both mother and unborn calf. “Not only do appropriate levels of microminerals improve conception and the retention of pregnancies, the unborn calf’s micromineral reserves are set up in utero, contributed from its mother’s reserves. Setting the mother up properly helps to set up the next generation.” Dr Bergman is encouraged by the early results of the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge. “It was really exciting to see obvious pigment changes in Ryan’s cattle when comparing the treated with the non-treated animals within the same management group. This really highlights the value of controlled studies. I am looking forward to getting in behind Ryan and Elisha’s cows at preg testing, to see if we can measure some fertility differences as well.” “It’s fascinating to be able to witness first-hand some of the benefits that Multimin is delivering,” he concludes. “I’m enjoying working with Ryan to further document the value that Multimin can deliver to our nation’s beef producers.” To find out more about how Multimin can improve your livestock performance, contact your local Virbac representative on 1800 242 100. Farmers can also follow the trials at www.multiminchallenge.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Beef producers Ryan and Elisha Willing with mentor Enoch Bergman Multimin treated versus non-treated Angus cows