The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2016-09-06T02:47:22Z Bionic Runner, Mick Thwaites, takes out third place at Badwater for second consecutive year 2016-09-06T02:47:22Z bionic-runner-mick-thwaites-takes-out-third-place-at-badwater-for-second-consecutive-year September 2016: Ask most people how they felt before, during and after a 24 hour, 217km race in 40+ degree heat and they’ll probably usher a few expletives. Ask Brisbane-based Mick Thwaites, however, and he’ll tell you he felt “Absolutely awesome!”Known as the toughest footrace on the planet, Badwater is such an extreme challenge many seasoned ultra marathon runners won’t even attempt it – or will fail to complete the event. 2016, however, represented Mick Thwaites’ second Badwater ultra marathon – and his second appearance on the podium. Perhaps even more startling, Mick only started running seriously back in 2012, when he kicked a 20-a-day smoking habit and signed up for his first half marathon.Set in California’s Death Valley, and scheduled for July, when temperatures can peak at around 49 degrees Celsius, race challenges include not only fierce weather conditions but also a grueling climb from 279 feet below sea level to 8360 feet above.Having secured third place in 2015, Mick took out the third position for the second consecutive year, and walked away with a time improvement of 2.5 hours. Whilst it was a particularly fast field of athletes, Mick himself credits some of this time improvement to the revolutionary way in which he trained for this year’s event. “I have been training with the Bionic Runner since December 2015, when I suffered a heel stress fracture,” he explains. “Initially the Bionic Runner was an integral part of my recovery process but that has developed and it’s now a solid part of my regular training program.”Like Mick, the Bionic Runner hails from Brisbane, but is now popping up in every corner of the world, having been sold into 31 countries and counting. As the only non-impact fitness trainer to mimic the natural gait and timing of running, it’s easy to see why the Bionic Runner is proving so popular with runners who, like Mick, either need to recover from injury, or put in more miles ahead of a big race – without stressing their joints.   Unlike an elliptical trainer, the Bionic Runner has a unique 60% swing and 40% stance phase timing, which guides the foot along the path of a mid-foot running gait. This means you not only look and feel as if you’re running, you engage the same muscles as you do running, too, which sets the Bionic Runner apart from any other cross trainer in the market. The difference is, with the Bionic Runner, you eliminate the risk of injury from the two most common causes of joint, tendon and muscle-related strain injuries - impact fatigue and joint over extension.For those needing to put in increasing numbers of miles ahead of any long-distance event, therefore increasing the risk of injury before the big day, the Bionic Runner is a game changer, allowing athletes to complete their running training without loading stress on the body.“I now use the Bionic Runner in my running program to target long fat burning sessions along with some high intensity low impact work,” says Mick, who sees the Bionic Runner as a real advantage when it comes to race training.“The Bionic Runner helped me minimise stress on the legs whilst adapting to a fast turnover,” he explains. “This adaptation to cover the distance and the specific HR training without placing overdue stress on the leg muscles, combined with the minimal impact on the system with an increased anabolic effort, has to be a winner,” he adds.Whilst Mick has suffered injuries in the past, leading up to Badwater he was fortunately injury free. That’s not to say the race didn’t throw up any challenges. “The wind and weather provided some un nerving moments. Also my body was throwing up some challenges in the first 100km.”Still, asked how he felt before, during and after the race, Mick’s response was: “Before? Absolutely awesome. During? A little bit awesome. After? Absolutely awesome!”Of course, ask any runner and the training doesn’t finish on the day of the event. Recovery needs some serious thought, too. For Mick, the Bionic Runner was also key to his rapid and effective race recovery.“I have been using the Bionic Runner religiously for recovery and training since my rehab last year,” he says. “The Bionic Runner is now integral to my recovery and I will include one session or two in my program. As well as a great recovery aid, it is also a top of the line training aid!” ENDSFor all press enquiries please contact +61 (0) 430 925028 or email lizzy@run4.comTimes of availability: 9am-7pm EST or by appointment.More information can be found at: www.run4.com. The Bionic Runner is available to purchase from run4.com How to stay running-injury free, for life 2016-07-25T03:57:16Z how-to-stay-running-injury-free-for-life Brisbane, July 2016 – Be it shin splints, a stress fracture or runner’s knee, if you’re a keen runner, the statistics say you’ll probably experience a running-related injury at some point in your career. In fact, some estimate that as many as 80% of runners are injured each and every year.   For those who are passionate about running, injury can present a real hurdle. Whilst some injuries are minor, and easily overcome, others can put pay to much-trained-for races, personal bests, and even conclude running careers.   A better way to train   Motivated by the certainty that there was a better way to train, Australian company run4 have spent the last few years developing a running tool that can change these overwhelming statistics. One that can proactively prevent running injuries.   “Most running injuries are caused by overuse—applying repeated force over a prolonged period of time,” explains Steve Cranitch, founder of run4. “Sudden changes in training volume can also do some damage, all adding up to inflammation, irritation and, ultimately, pain that prevents you from running.”   “The injury rates incurred by runners always struck me as alarming,” adds Steve, who witnessed a number of his friends abandon running altogether and instead turn to cycling. “For people who love running, cycling – or indeed any form of indoor cross training –  isn’t really an adequate alternative, so we set out to find a way for runners to improve their training and remove the risk of injury.”   What Steve and his team came up with has, over the past year, proven to change the way in which athletes both train and view injury prevention.      A supplementary training aid   Launched via a successful crowd funding campaign just one year ago, the Australian-born Bionic Runner is the world’s first – and only – non-impact outdoor fitness trainer to replicate the motion of running.   “Unlike an elliptical trainer, the Bionic Runner has a unique patent-pending 60% swing and 40% stance phase timing, which guides the foot along the path of a mid-foot running gait,” explains Steve. “Basically, you not only look and feel as if you’re running, you engage the same muscles as you would pounding the pavement, too, which sets the Bionic Runner apart from any other cross trainer in the market.”   Thanks to its non-impact closed kinetic chain, training with the Bionic Runner also eliminates the risk of injury from impact fatigue and joint over extension – the two most common causes of joint, tendon and muscle-related strain injuries.   A proactive training tool   Whilst injured runners around the world have been clamoring to buy the Bionic Runner in order to maintain their running fitness through injury, for others, the decision to purchase has been more about proactively preventing running injuries.   For US Masters marathon runner, Maggie Mason, the decision to purchase a Bionic Runner was all about preventing injury – and therefore keeping her outside, doing the thing she loves most – running.   “I have had my share of strained hamstrings, psoas or hip flexor spasms, popliteus tendinitis, etc., some of which sidelined me for weeks at a time,” she says. “Usually these occur during high-mileage weeks during a track or tempo session during marathon training.” The options available to Maggie in the past weren’t always enjoyable, particularly as they kept her indoors. “When I’ve been injured in the past, I’ve gone to what I call ellipticHell, which means going to the gym and doing hours of training indoors on the elliptical machine,” she says. “Whilst I don’t have any current injuries, I wanted to be proactive about cross training, so I could still be competitive as an older masters athlete.”   Maggie now uses the Bionic Runner to supplement her road running, therefore saving her legs from the pounding they would get, should she put in all the miles on the road. “I can’t do 70 mile weeks anymore, but the Bionic Runner lets me put in the equivalent,” she explains. “The Bionic Runner is a fantastic complement to running, and as a supplementary training aid there’s nothing better.” Backed by Research   The claims made by the team behind the Bionic Runner are also backed by research published in peer-reviewed journals. Collected over the last year, data published in the Australian Journal of Strength and Conditioning shows that, whether using the Bionic Runner for interval, Fartlek, tempo or hill sessions, the runner offers the same intensity as conventional running – without the risk of injury from over extension or impact fatigue.   Thanks to the Bionic Runner there is now a way for athletes to put in the mileage they need to each week to meet their running goals, without putting the strain on their body that will ultimately result in injury. ENDS     Contact information:   Running Trainer Pty Ltd   PO Box 761 Coorparoo Qld 4151.   CEO:                                  Steve Cranitch Marketing and PR:             Lizzy Fowler   For all press enquiries please contact +61 (0) 430 925028 or email lizzy@run4.com   Times of availability: 9am-7pm EST or by appointment.   More information can be found at: www.run4.com. The Bionic Runner is available to purchase from run4.com 63-year old John Shaw sets a second world running record in 2016 2016-07-25T03:50:32Z the-secret-weapon-behind-63-year-old-queenslander-s-two-running-world-records-in-2016 Brisbane, July 2016 – Running a world record at any age is a phenomenal achievement. Running a world record at 63 is perhaps even more so. Brisbane local, John Shaw, however, is now coming to terms with setting not one, but two world records in 2016 – and he only returned to running three short years ago, back when he celebrated his 60th birthday.   Now ranked #2 in the world for his age group (60-64), John’s road to success has not always been easy. Indeed, the outcome may have been very different had he not discovered the Bionic Runner, which also calls Queensland home.   Launched via a successful crowd funding campaign just one year ago, the Australian-born Bionic Runner is the world’s first – and only – non-impact fitness trainer to replicate the motion of running. As a cross-trainer, it has already taken the global running community by storm, changing the way in which athletes both train and view injury prevention. And whilst the majority of seasoned runners have sought out the Bionic Runner to help them run through injuries – and prevent their recurrence – for others, like John, the decision to train on a Bionic Runner has been all about pushing harder – and faster – than ever before.   Two world records in 2016    Earlier this year, saddled with a recurring calf injury, John decided to run a half marathon with just five week’s training – something that would have been impossible – or at the very least short sighted – without the help of the Bionic Runner.   “The Bionic Runner was my saviour during this dark period,” he recalls. “I put in 2-2.5 hour runs on the Bionic Runner every other day to maintain my aerobic fitness, but when race day came, I didn’t set a goal time, I just decided to try my best.”   Unbelievably, John ran 1.21.16 on an undulating course, with a 70 second PB. Fast forward just two weeks, and John joined team mates Ron Peters, Peter Reeves and Ian Cameron on the tarmac to attempt to beat a 4 x 1500m relay record that had stood for 20 years.   “On a hot summer’s morning we broke not one, but three records: the world record by 27 seconds; the Australian by 1:07 and the state by 3:01,” John recalls. “The regular hard workouts during my injury downtime made me a strong runner,” he adds. “With a stronger core, hips, glutes, quads and hamstrings I could push myself harder than I had ever done before.”   Of course, John hasn’t stopped there, going on to set a single-age world record for his time of 2.45.23 in the recent Gold Coast Marathon on July 3rd 2016. “Whilst training for the Gold Coast Airport Marathon I completed a 45-minute session on the Bionic Runner twice a week during light 80-110km training weeks, and once a week during heavier 110-160km training weeks,” says John. “Over time, this made me stronger in the hips and increased my cadence.”   A game-changer for serious runners   The Bionic Runner is the only non-impact fitness trainer to mimic the natural gait and timing of running. “Unlike an elliptical trainer, the Bionic Runner has a unique patent-pending 60% swing and 40% stance phase timing, which guides the foot along the path of a mid-foot running gait,” explains Steve Cranitch, founder of Run4, the company behind the Bionic Runner. “Basically, you not only look and feel as if you’re running, you engage the same muscles as you would pounding the pavement, too, which sets the Bionic Runner apart from any other cross trainer in the market.”   Thanks to its non-impact closed kinetic chain, training with the Bionic Runner also eliminates the risk of injury from impact fatigue and joint over extension – the two most common causes of joint, tendon and muscle-related strain injuries.   For runners like John, who ran a three-minute PB in the Gold Coast Airport Marathon, the Bionic Runner represents a game changer when it comes to training – allowing him to pro-actively prevent injury, or continue training through injury, when it occurs.   Speeding Recovery   Significantly for John, the Bionic Runner also represents a secret weapon when it comes to recovery. With just a few short weeks until his next challenge – the Marathon at the World Masters’ Games in Perth – John needs to get back into training immediately.    “The BR has been a saviour in recovery,” he says. “My lower legs “rejoice” when they are on the Bionic Runner as they get to have a holiday while the rest of my body gets back to the business of running.       Contact information:   Running Trainer Pty Ltd T/A Run4
 PO Box 52
 Broadwater NSW 2472 Australia   CEO:                                  Steve Cranitch Marketing and PR:             Lizzy Fowler   For all press enquiries please contact +61 (0) 430 925028 or email lizzy@run4.com   Times of availability: 9am-7pm EST or by appointment.   More information can be found at: www.run4.com. The Bionic Runner is available to purchase from run4.com Sydney mum hopes new business will inspire a generation of readers and help build a smarter Australia 2016-03-04T09:36:00Z sydney-mum-hopes-new-business-will-inspire-a-generation-of-readers-and-help-build-a-smarter-australia March 2016, Sydney: Reading aloud to your children is the single most important thing parents can do to encourage language development. Indeed, international studies show that sharing books with young children before they go to school greatly improves their chances of developing good literacy skills.  Sadly, however, recent Australian research into parents’ understanding of the importance of reading to very young children has revealed that more than a quarter of parents are not aware of the positive impact of reading aloud. Championing the importance of reading Speaking as ambassador for News Corp’s recent ‘Raise A Reader’ campaign, Jackie French, the Australian Children’s Laureate, author of more than 170 books and 2015 Senior Australian of the Year, believes high standards of literacy may even be crucial to maintaining a strong Australian economy. “Reading is the gateway for the future of our children and the planet,” Ms French says. Sydney-based Mum, Lizzy Fowler, believes her new venture, BookWormz – a monthly book subscription box service for children aged 0-7 - will help excite children and - just as importantly - parents when it comes to reading, and go some way to establish a new generation of book lovers. A former editor and writer, Lizzy left her city-based job in 2013 to become a mum. Two daughters (and hundreds of picture books) later and she has recently overseen the launch of BookWormz, alongside her husband, Chris. 'I hope that, through BookWormz, we can inspire a generation of book-lovers and introduce more parents to the joy of reading to their children,’ she says. ‘It’s so easy – and totally understandable – to sit your kids in front of the TV every evening but, through BookWormz, we want to encourage that all important, one-on-one time spent reading new books together.’ Building a smarter Australia According to a report by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, outside health and housing, encouraging a child to read and keeping them reading is arguably the single most important thing that can be done to influence positive outcomes in young people’s lives – socially, culturally, educationally and economically. 'There are so many reasons why children need to read and be read to,’ Lizzy adds. ‘Sitting down to read your child a story will not only help their language development and spark their imagination, but it also offers a wonderful time to just sit, read, listen and talk. Books start conversations.’ BookWormz, which will be supported by a Kickstarter campaign later this month, is Australia’s first book subscription box service designed exclusively for children. Whilst subscription boxes have enjoyed something of a boom in Australia over the past few years, book subscription boxes are, until now, a relatively untouched market. Through the BookWormz website, parents and gift-givers can sign up to a one-, three- or six-month subscription, choosing a box that is age-appropriate to their little one. From May this year, ‘little learners’ across Australia will receive their BookWormz Box in the post, personally addressed, each containing two carefully selected books and one complementary gift designed to spark creativity and imagination through play. Each box also contains a parent-card, designed to help parents get the most from the time they spend reading to their children, and a monthly BookWormz colouring competition to complete and share in an effort to win future boxes. 'Millions of people around the world don't have access to books and are unable to read. Here in Australia, we are lucky to live in a world full of books, with new titles published every month. Through BookWormz, I want to make it easy to bring these books into the home, and channel the excitement of receiving a gift directly into reading,’ explains Lizzy. 'I have extremely happy memories of being read to as a child - I devoured the magical worlds that existed inside the pages of books - and now, as a parent, I am finding just as much joy in introducing these worlds to my daughters. I believe BookWormz will not only inspire children, but also support the parent-child relationship, by carving time each month - and ideally each day - to explore new stories and adventures.' Each month, Lizzy works alongside Australian publishers and distributors to select the very best new books for each age category (0-2, 3-5 and 6-7), using her editorial experience and passion for words to ensure a carefully curated box your child will love. Visit www.bookwormz.com.au to find out more about the service and to sign up. You can also follow BookWormz on Instagram (bookwormzbox) and Facebook (/bookwormz). ENDS Contacts: For quotes or interviews, call 0430925028 or email info@bookwormz.com.au About BookWormz BookWormz is an Australian book subscription box service for children aged 0 to 7. Through the delivery of carefully selected books each month, BookWormz strives to inspire a new generation of book lovers, channelling the excitement of receiving a gift into age-appropriate books. Thinking about crowd funding? Three key lessons learned from running a successful Kickstarter campaign 2015-01-16T03:46:20Z thinking-about-crowd-funding-three-key-lessons-learned-from-running-a-successful-kickstarter-campaign Brisbane, 16 January 2015 – Type ‘crowd funding’ into any search engine and you’re bound to discover a wealth of success stories. Products and companies that have raised millions in just a short space of time, and which have gone on to make millions for those who dreamed them up (In the US, the biggest crowd funding deal ever raised more than $13m). Indeed, in 2014, funds raised via peer-to-peer lending were up 161%, building on three years of continued growth.Dig a little deeper, however, and you’ll also uncover the not-so-fortunate: the many thousands of examples of crowd funding campaigns that failed to reach their funding goal. It’s a common story.With four years of product development behind them, deciding to launch their product on Kickstarter – probably the best known of all the online crowd funding platforms – was an easy decision for Steve Cranitch and Dr Henry Thomas, the co-founders of Run4 and inventors of the Bionic Runner.“Kickstarter has a huge global audience, and is highly publicised by the media, so for us as a small, essentially unknown start-up company, it represented a great way to get our product in front of innovative thinkers, as well as the global media,” explains Steve.“To a certain extent we used our Kickstarter campaign as a way to test the market – see what people’s immediate reaction was to our product – as well as gain investment whilst holding on to 100% of our company.”Fortunately, the reaction to their Bionic Runner – the world’s first non-impact running fitness trainer that mimics the gait of running, designed to improve running training by removing the risk of injury from the two most common causes of injury – was overwhelmingly positive, and Steve and Henry saw their initial funding goal of AUD $40,000 met in just five days. Just a few days later and they’d made more than $100,000, as passionate runners from around the world decided to invest in their technology.“We didn’t expect the running community to get behind us in such a huge way,” says Steve, who has continued to receive regular emails from amateur and professional runners and triathletes who can’t wait to get their hands on the Bionic Runner when it is distributed to investors in March this year.Whilst theirs is a story of success, achieving a total of AUD $273,000 at the end of the campaign, both Steve and Henry acknowledge that, in certain areas, they faced unexpected challenges.Lesson One: The hard work doesn’t end when the campaign goes live“Reaching an audience of more than 13 million each month, we launched our campaign on Kickstarter thinking, ‘Right, this is it, let’s sit back and watch the investors come on board.’ We found this was certainly not the case,” says Steve. Instead, it became almost immediately obvious that it was down to them to drive traffic to their campaign.“The number of investors and volume of traffic we drove to our campaign ourselves, through PR initiatives and social media, far outweighed that driven by Kickstarter itself,” says Steve. “Even when our campaign was chosen as a coveted ‘Staff Pick’ after just one day, it easily got lost amongst all the other campaigns. If we hadn’t actively promoted our campaign, we could have failed to reach our goal.”Similarly, the volume of comments and queries that come through from potential investors throughout the life of the campaign demands constant attention.“Kickstarter attracts innovative thinkers, who have a desire for detail,” says Steve. “If you haven’t answered their specific questions in your Project Description, then you can expect to be responding to a lot of individual questions before they are converted into investors.”Lesson Two: Start creating a buzz long before your campaign goes liveMost successfully funded campaigns last just 30 days, which isn’t long to generate a buzz around your product on a global scale. Steve and Henry had the foresight to plan PR initiatives both in Australia and overseas well ahead of the launch of their campaign, ensuring relationships with key media had already been established when the time came to talk about their product.“You don’t have to have a huge marketing budget, either,” says Steve, who drew on online resources such as eLance to hire short-term PR and marketing professionals in key markets. “If relying on unknown recruits, however, it’s important to ask for daily activity reports so as not to waste the opportunity you have to create a buzz,” warns Steve.When it comes to creating buzz, Steve’s number one recommendation is to have product available for key influencers to review, before your crowd funding campaign goes live. “We had always planned to send Bionic Runners to bloggers, athletes and other key influencers ahead of our campaign launch, and had long since made contact with a number of writers who were ready and waiting to review our technology,” he says. “Sadly, manufacturing delays meant this didn’t work out, and we went live without having these reviews completed. Had we done so, I honestly believe our funding total would have been doubled.”Lesson Three: Timing is EverythingWhen it was first launched as a campaign on Kickstarter, the Coolest Cooler failed to reach its funding goal. The second time around, the so-called “21st Century Cooler” now famously went on to raise more than $13 million, and become the number one funded project of all time. The difference? The first campaign was run during the winter months, whilst the second was launched in the summer.“Most of our sales came from the USA and Europe. But it was in the middle of winter and snowing in many places – not the ideal time to launch a running product,” says Steve, who launched the campaign on December 1 – high summer in his native Australia.Ultimately, their campaign to launch the Bionic Runner into the global running community was a huge success, and with pre-ordering going live on their website in the next few weeks, Steve and Henry have a busy 2015 to look forward to.“We spent four years designing and perfecting the Bionic Runner, so to see it so instantly appeal to runners on a global scale is a dream come true,” says Steve. “Now we can’t wait for March, when the first Bionic Runners will be air freighted to our Kickstarter investors” ENDSMore: http://www.run4.comContact information:Running Trainer Pty LtdT/A Run4
PO Box 52
BroadwaterNSW2472AustraliaCEO:                          Steve CranitchCTO:                          Henry ThomasMarketing and PR:    Lizzy FowlerFor all press enquiries please contact +61 (0) 430 925028 or email lizzy@run4.comTimes of availability: 9am-7pm EST or by appointment. New Year, New Year’s Running Resolution – Stay Injury Free in 2015 and Achieve Your Running Fitness Goals 2014-12-25T23:51:12Z new-year-new-year-s-running-resolution-stay-injury-free-in-2015-and-achieve-your-running-fitness-goals Brisbane, 26 December 2014 – As January 1 dawns, inspiring each of us to dream big, as many as 40% of people will begin 2015 with a new year’s resolution front of mind. Yet, according to statistics, only 8% will go on to achieve that goal. For those hoping to reignite their running career, setting a goal is just the start. And, whether it’s to set a new PB, run a marathon or simply spend a year free from injury, the team at Run4 have developed a training tool that can help any passionate runner go on to achieve those goals.  Revolutionising Running Training The Bionic Runner is the world’s first non-impact, running-specific fitness trainer and, since launching in December 2014, is already promising to change the way people think about their running training the world over. Ranked as the third all time fastest Australian female over 50km, ultra runner Kerrie Otto de Grancy recently spoke out about her experience with the Bionic Runner, using the Bionic Runner both in the lead up to the 100km World Championships, and during recovery. “I dedicated the majority of my training time in the last three weeks before the 100km World Championships to training on the Bionic Runner,” she says. “This enabled me to clock up the kilometres and time on my legs that I needed without impact. I feel at an advantage that I was able to ease back into running after the event and allow my body to recover properly by alternating between the Bionic Runner, road and track running,” she adds.  Injury Prevention For Steve Cranitch and Dr Henry Thomas, the co-founders of Run4 and co-creators of the Bionic Runner, Kerrie’s words are music to their ears. “We set out to design a piece of equipment that would simply help runners run better,” says Steve, who had noticed many of his friends abandon their running careers in favour of cycling as injury got in their way. “So many – too many – runners become injured in the lead up to important races, or simply from doing too much, too soon,” he continues. “For years, sports shoes have been promising to fix injury rates, but injury rates have remained the same, and as far as cross training goes, there’s nothing out there that mimics the motion of running.” One of those runners is Melanie Long, who has long held the dream of running the New York Marathon on her 40th birthday, in 2015. Sadly, a spate of injuries left her questioning whether her dream would actually come true. “I’ve endured four stress fractures to date,” says Melanie, “and with each one my goal of running the New York Marathon has seemed less and less achievable.”  For injured runners like Melanie, the Bionic Runner offers some hope – a means of retaining their running fitness without stressing the body. “With the Bionic Runner it’s the first time I’ve found something that doesn’t hurt my shin or knee and will assist with my fitness, muscle strength and running,” says Melanie, who is now preparing for the race of her life – the New York Marathon. “I now see a way forward and am so excited about making the dream a reality.” Improved Performance Whilst the Bionic Runner was originally conceived as a piece of kit to help prevent injuries in runners, it’s this latter point that makes the Bionic Runner a revolutionary tool in the runner’s training kit. “Aside from improving general fitness, cross training will only be effective in terms of your running performance if it recruits and exercises the same muscles as running does,” explains Dr Henry Thomas who, as chief-technical officer at Run4, designed the Bionic Runner. “Unlike a mobile elliptical trainer, the Bionic Runner has a unique 60% swing and 40% stance phase timing, which guides the foot along the path of a mid-foot running gait,” he continues. “This means you not only look and feel as if you’re running, you recruit the same muscles as you would running, too, therefore improving running performance.” Indeed, during the four years it took them to develop the Bionic Runner, Steve and Henry discovered that running was a four-stage process of leap, recovery, impact and drive. “The existing cross trainers were all elliptical in nature or step machines. None captured the motion a runner’s leg makes when they move,” explains Henry. With the addition of its non-impact, closed kinetic chain, the Bionic Runner also removes the risk of injury from over extension and impact fatigue – the two most common causes of joint, tendon and muscle-related strain injuries.  Successfully Funded Launched on Kickstarter on December 1, it took just five days for the Bionic Runner to be successfully funded, clearly resonating with the global running community. “We spent four years designing and perfecting the Bionic Runner, so to see it so instantly appeal to runners on a global scale is a dream come true,” says Steve. “Now we can’t wait for 2015, when we can watch the community of Bionic Runners grow and grow!” The Bionic Runner will remain available on Kickstarter at a discounted price until December 31, when it will be available to purchase on the website www.run4.com. ENDS https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1032540393/the-bionic-runner-run-harder-land-safer   Contact information: Running Trainer Pty Ltd T/A Run4
 PO Box 52
 Broadwater NSW 2472 Australia   CEO:                          Steve Cranitch CTO:                          Henry Thomas Marketing and PR:    Lizzy Fowler For all press enquiries please contact +61 (0) 430 925028 or email lizzy@run4.com  Times of availability: 9am-7pm EST or by appointment. More information can be found at: www.run4.com Elite ultra runner, Kerrie Otto de Grancy, pushes through injury thanks to the Bionic Runner 2014-12-12T05:01:07Z elite-ultra-runner-kerrie-otto-de-grancy-pushes-through-injury-thanks-to-the-bionic-runner Brisbane, 12 December 2014 – Ranked number one all time fastest Australian female in 50km distance and with three Australian records to her name, there’s no denying Kerrie Otto de Grancy is a force to be reckoned with when it comes to endurance running. Injury, however, can strike at any time, and an earlier strain recently threatened to overshadow Kerrie’s chances of competing in the 100km World Championships in Qatar.CAPTION: Kerrie Otto de Grancy reveals she used the Bionic Runner to maintain fitness in the face of injury in the lead up to the 100km World Championships in QatarWith just weeks until race day, Kerrie decided to push through the strain with the help of the Bionic Runner, the world’s first non-impact, running specific fitness trainer, rather than losing valuable time and hindering her race preparation by sitting out and waiting for the strain to heal.“Ironically the Bionic Runner couldn’t have arrived in my hands at a better time,” says Kerrie. “I literally started using the Bionic Runner one week after an old sprain caused a series of issues in my foot, preventing me from running. I was petrified and kept this news between my medical supports, my mentor Patrick Farmer, my coach Chris Truscott and I.”Whilst Kerrie was able to keep up her strength work and yoga, running was out of the question, as even walking was proving difficult for her.“I dedicated the majority of my training time in the last three weeks before the 100km World Championships to training on the bionic runner,” she says. “This enabled me to clock up the kilometres and time on my legs that I needed without impact, allowing my foot to heal.“Psychologically this alone was invaluable, not to mention the maintenance of my fitness and ability to use the same biomechanics as If I was pounding the pavement on foot.”For the creators of the Bionic Runner, Steve Cranitch and Henry Thomas, Kerrie’s story is proof they’ve achieved what they set out to, four years ago, when the concept of the Bionic Runner was conceived.“In the running community, Kerrie’s story is all too common,” says Steve. “The miles you need to put in in the lead up to race day puts such a strain on the body that it’s certainly not uncommon to wind up injured or unfit on the day you need to be performing at your best.”Ultimately, Steve and Henry believed there must be a better way for runners to train – not only for races but everyday – and spent four years developing the Bionic Runner, which was launched on the crowdfunding platform Kickstarter at the beginning of this month.Originally conceived as a means of helping prevent injuries in runners – whilst also assisting those with running injuries get back into their training and maintain their fitness without causing further damage – the Bionic Runner is the world’s only non-impact fitness trainer to mimic the natural gait and timing of running.Unlike a mobile elliptical trainer, the Bionic Runner has a unique patent-pending 60% swing and 40% stance phase timing, which guides the foot along the path of a mid-foot running gait. This means you not only look and feel as if you’re running, you engage the same muscles as you would hitting the road, too, separating the Bionic Runner from any cross trainer on the market.“We discovered that running was a four stage process of leap, recovery, impact and drive,” explains Dr Henry Thomas, Chief Technical Officer and Co-founder of Run4. “The existing cross trainers were all elliptical in nature or step machines. None captured the motion a runner’s leg makes when they move.”Thanks to its non-impact closed kinetic chain, with the Bionic Runner Steve and Henry have successfully managed to eliminate the risk of injury from impact fatigue and joint over extension – the two most common causes of joint, tendon and muscle-related strain injuries.For Kerrie, the Bionic Runner came into its own post-race, too.“After the 100km event, the same foot wasn’t happy,” she recalls. “I wasn’t able to run on my foot for 19 days after my race. I feel at an advantage that I was able to ease back into running and allow my body to recover properly by alternating between the Bionic runner, road and track running.”The Bionic Runner will remain available on Kickstarter until December 31. And, whilst there’s a clear advantage to be had by the injured runner, Kerrie also points out the other advantage of the Bionic Runner. “It’s fun and breaks up the monotony of pounding the pavement day in and day out,” she says. ENDShttps://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1032540393/the-bionic-runner-run-harder-land-safe Contact information:For all press enquiries please contact +61 (0) 430 925028 or email lizzy@run4.com Times of availability: 9am-7pm EST or by appointment.More information can be found at: www.run4.com Aussie running technology a massive hit on Kickstarter as funding goal reached in just five days 2014-12-07T22:30:53Z aussie-running-technology-a-massive-hit-on-kickstarter-as-funding-goal-reached-in-just-five-days Brisbane, 7 December 2014 – It may have started life in the back of a converted shipping container in far northern Queensland, but this week the Bionic Runner proved a hit on a global scale, with funders from Asia, the US and Europe, not-to-mention Australia, all jumping on board to fund this unique fitness trainer via Kickstarter.“We’ve spent four years designing and perfecting the Bionic Runner, so to see it so instantly resonate with the running community on a global scale is a dream come true,” says Steve Cranitch, co-founder of Run4, the Australian start-up company behind the Bionic Runner.CAPTION: The Bionic Runner is set to challenge the way runners conventionally think about their training, and promises to prevent injury thanks to its non-impact, closed kinetic chainOriginally conceived as a means of helping prevent injuries in runners – whilst also assisting those with running injuries get back into their training and maintain their fitness without causing further damage – the Bionic Runner took four years to develop and is the world’s only non-impact fitness trainer to mimic the natural gait and timing of running.Unlike a mobile elliptical trainer such as the ElliptiGO, the Bionic Runner has a unique patent-pending 60% swing and 40% stance phase timing, which guides the foot along the path of a mid-foot running gait. The result? You not only look and feel as if you’re running, you engage the same muscles as you would pounding the pavement, too, separating the Bionic Runner from any cross trainer on the market.“We discovered that running was a four stage process of leap, recovery, impact and drive,” explains Dr Henry Thomas, Chief Technical Officer and Co-founder of Run4. “The existing cross trainers were all elliptical in nature or step machines. None captured the motion a runner’s leg makes when they move.”There’s no doubt the Bionic Runner is filling a gaping hole in the running industry, as runners from around the world have sent messages of support since the Runner went on sale via Kickstarter on December 1. Whilst sports shoes have attempted – and claimed – to alleviate the rate of running injuries for the past 40 years, there has been little actual change in the statistics.Indeed, whilst an estimated 60 million people around the world are thought to enjoy running, a massive 70 per cent will go on to suffer a running related injury each year. Of course, for those training for a race, the risk of injury heightens with the additional number of miles put in towards the end of training.“The injury rates incurred by runners always struck us as alarming,” says Steve, who witnessed a number of his friends abandon running altogether and instead turn to cycling. “For people who love running, cycling isn’t really an adequate alternative, so we set out to find a way for runners to improve their training and remove the risk of injury.”Thanks to its non-impact closed kinetic chain, with the Bionic Runner Steve and Henry have successfully managed to eliminate the risk of injury from impact fatigue and joint over extension – the two most common causes of joint, tendon and muscle-related strain injuries.“With the Bionic Runner, you can push yourself harder in training than you normally would running – increasing fitness, strength and endurance so that, on race day, you’re not only fit, but faster,” says Steve.Launched on December 1 via the crowdfunding platform Kickstarter, it took just five days for Steve and Henry to reach their funding goal. It took just 12 hours for them to then double this goal.Perhaps this success is in part down to the fact that the claims made by the Bionic Runner are backed by research published in peer-reviewed journals. Collected over the last year, data published in the Australian Journal of Strength and Conditioning shows that, whether using the Bionic Runner for interval, Fartlek, tempo or hill sessions, the runner offers the same intensity as conventional running – without the risk of injury from over extension or impact fatigue.The Bionic Runner will remain available on Kickstarter until December 31. “We’re thrilled so many runners appreciate our vision and our hard work, and we just want as many people to benefit from this unique technology as possible,” concludes Steve. ENDSMore: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1032540393/the-bionic-runner-run-harder-land-saferHigh res images available to download from http://www.run4.com/en/media. Interviews available on request.