The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2020-03-11T02:10:09Z Upcoming events lift the bar on weaner profitability for farmers 2020-03-11T02:10:09Z upcoming-events-lift-the-bar-on-weaner-profitability-for-farmers Coming to Tumut on Monday 16th March, Young on Tuesday 17th, Gunnedah and Dubbo on Wednesday the 18th March, Farmers will have the opportunity to discover practical tips and advice covering: - The latest industry research & findings in weaner health & wellbeing - Best practice for the weaning of cattle - Strategic choice and use of worm and liver fluke drenches to deliver production benefits, especially in young cattle Speaking at all events will be Elders Livestock Production Manager, Adam Turnball and Virbac Australia Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager, Dr Matt Ball who will cover weaner management to ensure farmers are getting the highest performance out of their young stock through optimal weaner management programs and best practice parasite control. Virbac Senior Product Manager, Tiago Carmona said “This is set to be an incredibly valuable opportunity for beef producers to gain insight from two of the industries leading authorities on optimising productivity and profitability in beef operations” he went on to say, “I know both Matt and Adam are looking forward to sharing these insights to support Australian beef farmers in improving their weaner management this Autumn.” While each event is free to attend, rsvp is recommended. “We expect all events to be very popular,” says Tiago, “so for anyone interested, it’s a good idea to RSVP with your local participating Elders store so you can secure your spot.” Interested attendees can call their local participating Elders Store to reserve a place: Elders Tumut on 6947 1544 Elders Young, Jason Bennett on 6381 3300 Elders Dubbo on 6883 1800 Elders Gunnedah 6748 3000 or Luke Wiggan 0447 653 900 WHAT: Virbac & Elders Road Show – Lifting the Bar on Weaner Profitability WHEN and WHERE: TUMUT NSW Monday 16th March, commencing at 6:30pm at the Oriental Hotel Tumut. To find out more, or RSVP, please contact Elders Tumut on 6947 1544. YOUNG NSW Tuesday 17th March, at 10:00am at The Elders store, 232 Boorowa St, Young. To find out more, or RSVP, please contact Jason Bennett, Elders Young on 6381 3300 DUBBO NSW Wednesday 18th March, commencing at 8:00am at the Elders Dubbo Branch, 37 Bourke Street. To find out more, or RSVP, please contact Elders Dubbo on 6883 1800. GUNNEDAH NSW Wednesday 18th March, at the Elders Gunnedah Branch, 15 Mullaley Road, at 5:00pm. To find out more, or RSVP, call Elders Gunnedah 6748 3000 or Luke Wiggan 0447 653 900. Media are invited to attend the event and interview: - Elders Livestock Production Manager, Adam Turnball - Virbac Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager, Dr Matt Ball - Representatives from Elders and Virbac Australia - Local farmers in attendance - ENDS - Media enquiries: Kyleen Partridge, C7EVEN Communications 02 6766 4513 / 0467 612 224 kyleen.partridge@c7even.com.au Adam Turnball Bio: ADAM TURNBULL ELDERS LIVESTOCK ANIMAL PRODUCTION ADVISOR Adam has over 19 years’ experience in the livestock industry. He owns his own Brangus herd and has a passion for working with his clients to develop early weaning programs which aim to improve herd productivity and results. Adam is extremely passionate about the rural industry and most importantly, its profitability. He has extensive experience working with veterinarians, nutritionists and farmers to achieve the highest outcomes possible, especially in the area of young stock management. Through his role at Elders, Adam has developed livestock production performance programs for his clients focussing on disease prevention and management whilst lifting the bar of profitability & production on farm. He is a firm believer that Animal Health Programs must not only consider vaccination and parasite control programs, but also practical and provide the highest returns for his clients. Dr Matt Ball Bio: DR MATT BALL VIRBAC SENIOR LIVESTOCK TECHNICAL VETERINARIAN Dr Matthew Ball is a veterinarian, Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager at Virbac Animal Health and the owner of Beacon Veterinary Surgery. Matt has 20 years’ experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. Throughout his career, Matt has worked in various roles including clinical practice, government and industry. He has undertaken post graduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, Matt is based on the northern rivers of NSW. Photo credit: Adam Turnball, Elders Livestock Production Manager Dr Matt Ball, Virbac Senior Livestock Technical Services Manager Livestock trace mineral challenge – Entries closing soon! 2020-01-20T22:26:07Z livestock-trace-mineral-challenge-entries-closing-soon There are less than 10 days left to enter Virbac Australia’s $34,000 Multimin Performance Ready Challenge. Widespread rain and storms providing useful falls across QLD, NSW and Victoria over the past week has re-built graziers’ confidence to improve the condition of their drought-affected stock and one leading animal health company want to assist producers to do this. If your goals are to improve the health and productivity of your livestock, then this is the perfect opportunity. With less than 10 days to go, beef, sheep and dairy producers are being encouraged to get their entry in for Virbac Australia’s Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, focused on the effective use of trace mineral injections for cattle and sheep. As part of the Challenge, up to seventy-five producers will receive discounted Multimin product in exchange for sharing their experiences and results from following a Multimin program, and one lucky competing individual or team will win an overseas study tour and free Multimin product. With the total prize pool valued at more than $34,000, the prize will offer professional development tailored to the winner and their enterprise. “Current entries across all states indicate that round one of the Multimin Challenge will be full of healthy competition among cattle and sheep producers,” said Dr Jerry Liu, Nutritionist and Livestock Nutrition Marketing Manager at Virbac Australia. Last year’s Multimin Challenge saw Renee Murfett, dairy producer from Framlingham, Victoria take out first prize. “With the guidance of Multimin Challenge experts, we ran a trial on our calves to see what effect Multimin may have on their general health and disease rates. The trial confirmed the critical roles that trace minerals play in immunity and animal health, and we certainly saw improvements in our calves within the first 12 weeks of treatment. Optimisation of trace minerals at high demand time points provided us with improved animal health and productivity,” Renee said. Virbac Australia have brought together some of Australia’s best vets and livestock nutrition experts to work with the challengers. The panel of experts will use their experience to guide and judge the challengers as well as share their knowledge and advice with Multimin Challenge followers. “All in all, the competition is perfect for any livestock producer wanting to work with some of Australia’s most experienced livestock nutritionist experts. They will have the opportunity to improve conception rates and immune function, as well as see tighter calving intervals, reduced disease, and better general health in 2020. And in some situations, I've seen weight gain benefits in prime lamb and beef cattle,” said Multimin Challenge expert Dr Graham Lean, Principal Consultant at Agrivet Business Consulting. Round one entries are closing soon on Friday 31st January for those producers wanting to compete in March to June. Now is the time to nominate a mate or enter yourself at multiminchallenge.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: 1. 2019 Multimin Challenge Winner, Renee Murfett, Victoria 2. Dr Graham Lean, Principal Consultant at Agrivet Business Consulting Australia’s number one trace mineral competition is back to assist farmers in improving animal growth and fertility. 2019-12-01T19:30:00Z australias-number-one-trace-mineral-competition-is-back-to-assist-farmers-in-improving-animal-growth-and-fertility It has certainly been a challenging year for most livestock producers across the country. The on-going impact of poor to desperate seasons across Australia has focused many cattle and sheep producers on the nutritional challenges and one leading animal health company is determined to assist. Virbac Australia are now inviting sheep, beef and dairy producers to enter the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge, a 12-month program focused on the effective use of trace mineral injections for cattle and sheep. As part of the Challenge up to seventy-five producers will receive discounted Multimin product in exchange for sharing their experiences and results with using Multimin and one lucky competing individual or team will win the ultimate prize of an overseas study tour. Valued at more than $21,000, the prize will offer professional development tailored to the winner and their enterprise. “Last year’s challenge received an incredible amount of support and engagement from the public and livestock experts all over Australia. Challengers saw better conception rates, tighter calving intervals, improved immune function, reduced disease, and better general health,” said Dr Jerry Liu, Nutritionist and Livestock Nutrition Marketing Manager, Virbac Australia. For previous Multimin Challenge winner Renee Murfett, the Multimin Challenge was a great opportunity to see the significant impact of trace mineral supplementation on her dairy calves immunity and health. As part of her prize, Virbac Australia is sending Renee to the World Ag Expo in the USA in February where she will learn more about best-practice dairy farming. “We want to work with sheep, beef and dairy producers from across Australia to see how they too can improve fertility, animal health and ultimately herd performance with the use of Multimin and encourage all to enter,” says Dr Liu. “We know that during high demand periods such as joining, weaning and birthing, animals have elevated requirements for trace minerals. And consequently, with less feed available than normal in many areas of Australia, stock are not receiving many nutrients, including trace minerals.” “Large parts of the country are certainly struggling and keeping a positive mentality can be difficult for producers during these unfavorable times. The industry data we are seeing is indicative of this with producers purchasing less drenches and vaccines which is one sign that stock numbers have declined. There are far fewer animals to treat this year versus last year the last few weeks of bushfires doesn’t help. “Our national interest is to re-build Australia’s livestock numbers and improving the immunity and fertility in our animals will be a major contributor to this. During these tough times, improved health and productivity is going to pay off and we want to assist producers as much as we can to do this,” Dr Liu said. Angus producer Nick Boshammer from NBGenetics in Chinchilla, QLD has recently had a positive result with Multimin and looks forward to entering the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge to further advance his herd and gain access to industry experts. “I used Multimin pre-joining in October this year and saw a 100% response rate in my fixed time AI program. I want to get as many AI pregnancies as I can which means getting stock in calf as early as possible. It’s about increasing my animals’ trace minerals levels during this high demand period to give them every opportunity to cycle early on. “We need all the help we can get in these tough conditions, so I’ll be entering the Multimin Challenge this year and encouraging my friends to enter as well. I think there is a big opportunity for Multimin to be used in early weaned calves. I will Multimin every one of my weaned calves this month to give them a rapid top-up of essential minerals for future performance and fertility,” Mr Boshammer said. As part of the program, producers will have the support and expertise of some of Australia’s most experienced animal experts to hone their operations. Experts include: Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas, Technical Services Manager for Nutrition at Virbac Australia Dr Matthew Ball, Veterinarian and Senior Technical Services Manager - Cattle at Virbac Australia and owner of Beacon Veterinary Dr George Cox, Technical Services Manager - Sheep at Virbac Australia Dr Colin Trengove, Veterinarian and Managing Director, Pro-Ag Consulting Dr Enoch Bergman, Owner Veterinarian, Swans Veterinary Services Dr Graham Lean, Principal Consultant at Agrivet Business Consulting As well as the overseas trip, the overall winner will also take home a 12-month supply of Multimin. The second and third runners-up will receive a six month supply of Multimin. Entries for the Multimin Performance Ready Challenge are open from 1 December 2019 with only seventy-five challengers selected. To find out more and to enter, visit www.multiminchallenge.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Nick Boshammer from NBGenetics Dr Enoch Bergman, member of the Multimin Challenge expert panel Target Sheep event tours New South Wales & Victoria offering key insights in the fight against worms. 2019-11-29T05:44:04Z target-sheep-event-tours-new-south-wales-victoria-offering-key-insights-in-the-fight-against-worms With summer drenching season upon us, leading animal health company Virbac Australia has just completed a roadshow throughout regional New South Wales and Victoria, educating producers on parasite management, with a special focus on the importance of an effective summer drenching program and current drench resistance levels in the Yass, Boorowa, Euroa, Ballarat and Hamilton regions. Virbac’s Target Sheep initiative is aimed at optimising the health and performance of livestock at three key stages of the production cycle; pre-joining, pre-lambing and marking/weaning. The roadshow focused on how to increase productivity by managing worm resistance with an effective drench program. The Target Sheep events bring together industry experts, veterinarians and producers to improve on-farm productivity and profitability through leading animal health management practices and industry benchmarks. Key speakers at this weeks events included Veterinary Parasitology Consultant, Dr Tim Elliott and Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager’s, Emily Fowler, Matthew Grylls and Rod Evans. Tim’s presentation educated producers about worm biology and their life cycle, with tips on pasture management and drench strategies to reduce the risk of internal parasites specific to the region. “A summer drench at this time of year needs to be a very effective drench to ensure a successful reduction in worm burden,” said Tim. “Weaned lambs are highly susceptible to worms, but effective drenching helps to increase weaner growth rates. For all these reasons, this first summer drench is of vital importance, so farmers can remove the worm burden in individual livestock, reduce pasture contamination from worms and allow for healthier weaners over summer.” During the Yass event, Emily Fowler encouraged attendees to join Virbac’s Target Sheep program which allows producers to formulate sheep managing strategies specific to their region. “With resistance to treatment becoming an increasing problem, the summer drench farmers choose can make a huge difference in the success of any worm control program. For these reasons, farmers must choose a potent and persistent solution that protects stock against infection and boosts sheep wellbeing and productivity, for healthier, more profitable farms. The Target Sheep program is a practical forum with open discussions and engagement from independent experts. The group aims to tackle relative important issues throughout the sheep production cycle.” Around 20 local sheep producers attended the Boorowa event, and Brad Smith from Neringah Farm described his local event as a very informative day. “I find it concerning that there will be no new drench actives being released in the near future and therefore appreciated Dr Tim Elliot's emphasis on the importance of drench selection and conducting regular worm egg counts.” With summer storms becoming a common occurrence in the Boorowa region, Emily Fowler explained now is not the time to be complacent in worm management programs. “Summer storm events are breeding pools for barbers pole worm and liver fluke. We encouraged all attendees to continue monitoring their sheep and carry out regular worm egg tests as well as be aware of the resistance levels on their farm as no two farms are the same. Hopefully this has been a useful discussion for our local producers, and it’s given them some useful information to now go out and act on.” Virbac will be hosting further Target Sheep events throughout Australia in the coming months. For more information, visit https://au.virbac.com, follow Virbac Australia on Facebook or Instagram or call 1800 242 100. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo caption: Target Sheep Boorowa Event Target Sheep Yass Event Veterinarian offers production advice to Young farmers looking to rebuild stock numbers. 2019-11-04T21:35:40Z veterinarian-offers-production-advice-to-young-farmers-looking-to-rebuild-stock-numbers While Australia’s sheep industry may be facing its smallest sheep flock on record, strong lamb prices are making this an ideal time for farmers to begin rebuilding depleted stocks. Designed to improve the knowledge and understanding of how producers can increase lambing rates and share insights into the latest reproductive science, Virbac Australia recently held a pre-joining information day in Young, NSW headlined by Dr John Webb Ware, Senior Livestock Consultant at the University of Melbourne. Attendees had the chance to learn about important nutritional and management considerations to help them achieve an increased lambing rate and were also informed about Virbac’s fecundity vaccine which has been identified as a key component to boost lamb numbers. As Dr Webb Ware explains, “Ovastim is a practical and economical method to help increase lamb production. The vaccine directly influences a ewe’s fecundity, increasing the number of eggs available for fertilisation by immunising the animal against the hormone androstenedione, which alters ovarian function. That, in turn, leads to an increase in the number of twin births, which is an important factor in boosting lamb numbers.” With high stock prices, reproductive efficiency is an important determinant of the profitability of most sheep enterprises – and Dr Webb Ware goes on to explain how Ovastim can increase lambing rates primarily through an increase in the number of twin births. “With good management practices, more lambs on the ground will result in improved sales, to further benefit a producer’s bottom line.” With 14 local sheep producers attending Wednesday’s event, sheep producer Marty Corcoran from Boorowa described the event as a great opportunity to learn more about nutritional and management considerations to improve lambing rates. "The Ovastim information morning was highly insightful in how farmers can manage the reproductive performance of their sheep flock. Nutritional management prior to joining and the cost efficiency of maintaining ewe condition through the dry were two key messages from the morning. I use Ovastim and have successfully increased our lambing percentages by 20-30% in our 1st X-ewes flock which has seen us push industry benchmarks,” Marty said. For Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager, Emily Fowler, the event was a unique opportunity for attendees to ask questions specific to their production systems, and learn from a leader in the field. “This was a truly unique chance to learn the latest in reproductive and fertility science, and we’re thrilled to hear the positive responses from attendees.” For Dr Webb Ware, the benefits are undeniable. “If well managed, Ovastim can have a tremendously positive impact on high yielding lamb production systems for the rapid breeding of replacement stock.” To find out more about Ovastim, visit au.virbac.com Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo caption: Local sheep producer, Marty Corcoran with Virbac Australia representative Dr George Cox Local sheep producer, Marty Corcoran with Virbac Australia representative Emily Fowler Target Sheep event tours New South Wales offering key insights in the fight against worms. 2019-10-31T22:53:11Z target-sheep-event-tours-new-south-wales-offering-key-insights-in-the-fight-against-worms With summer drenching season fast approaching, leading animal health company Virbac Australia has just wrapped up a roadshow throughout regional New South Wales, educating producers on parasite management, with a special focus on current drench resistance levels in the Cootamundra, Gundagai and Tamworth regions. Virbac’s Target Sheep animal health initiative is aimed at optimising the health and performance of livestock at three key stages of the production cycle; pre-joining, pre-lambing and marking/weaning. These events focused on how to increase productivity by managing worm resistance with an effective drench program. The program brings together industry experts, veterinarians and producers to improve on-farm productivity and profitability through leading animal health management practices and industry benchmarks. Key speakers at recent events included Veterinary Parasitology Consultant, Dr Tim Elliott and Virbac Australia Area Sales Manager’s, Emily Fowler, Adrian Whitehead and Andrew Mulligan. Tim’s presentation educated producers about worm biology and their life cycle, with tips on pasture management and drench strategies to reduce the risk of internal parasites specific to the region. “A summer drench at this time of year needs to be a very effective drench to ensure a successful reduction in worm burden,” said Tim. “Weaned lambs are highly susceptible to worms, but effective drenching helps to increase weaner growth rates. For all these reasons, this first summer drench is of vital importance, so farmers can remove the worm burden in individual livestock, reduce pasture contamination from worms and allow for healthier weaners over summer.” During the Gundagai event, Adrian Whitehead explained the importance of a pre-summer drench and how to develop the right summer drench program for your property. “With resistance to treatment becoming an increasing problem, the summer drench farmers choose can make a huge difference in the success of any worm control program. For these reasons, farmers must choose a potent and persistent solution that protects stock against infection and boosts sheep wellbeing and productivity, for healthier, more profitable farms. Tim’s presentation really highlighted the need for all sheep producers to carry out regular worm tests and be aware of the resistance levels on their farm as no two farms are the same.” Around 20 local sheep producers attended the Gundagai event, and Tony Engel from “Cascade”, South West Slopes NSW described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn how to identify resistance to drenches and how to best manage it. Tim’s presentation allowed me to understand how resistance can occur and it is important to be on the front foot. Adrian Whitehead from Virbac will come out to do some drench resistance testing on my weaners which will be very informative, and I will use that information to select the right drenches for my property.” With drought conditions still a major issue across much of NSW, Adrian Whitehead explained now is not the time to be complacent in worm management programs. “We encouraged all attendees to continue monitoring their sheep and carry out regular worm egg tests as we approach summer”. “Hopefully this has been a useful discussion for the group, and it’s given them some useful information to now go out and act on.” Virbac will be hosting further Target Sheep events throughout Australia in the coming months. For more information, visit https://au.virbac.com, follow Virbac Australia on Facebook or Instagram or call 1800 242 100. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo caption: Target Sheep Cootamundra event presentation Local producer's sheep Injectable trace minerals: a solution to combat livestock heat stress this summer 2019-10-20T21:00:00Z injectable-trace-minerals-a-solution-to-combat-livestock-heat-stress-this-summer-1 With forecasts predicting another long hot summer ahead for southern regions, trace mineral supplementation is one effective solution to help combat heat stress in livestock over the coming months, says animal health company Virbac Australia. “High temperatures can affect everything from conception and fertility rates to immunity, meat quality and milk production, leading to significant economic impacts for producers,” reports Virbac Australia’s Technical Services Veterinarian Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas. “In extreme cases, it can even lead to livestock mortality.” Cattle begin feeling uncomfortable above 25°C – which means that heat stress will be an issue across all Australian livestock regions. For southern regions, cattle are particularly at risk of heat stress coming out of winter, and are more exposed to extreme heat events. What’s often surprising is that it’s not only extremely high daytime temperatures that trigger heat stress. Warmer night times can have more of an impact, says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. “Hot nights can be dangerous for livestock, as it’s harder to thermoregulate, dissipate heat accumulated during the day, and reduce their core temperature. That places them under continuous stress, increasing respiration, heart rate and water intake, and placing a strain on multiple physiological processes. In fact, recent research has revealed air temperatures rising as little as just 1.5°C above average can decrease conception rates by as much as 5%1. Even before birth, calves suffer the negative consequences of heat stress if cows were heat stressed during late pregnancy2.” “Heat stress affects the animal’s oxidative status, it increases the production of free radicals and reduces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to oxidative stress. In both beef cattle and sheep, oxidising agents present in the meat lead to lipid and protein peroxidation affecting muscle fibre structure, resulting in high drip loss, undesirable meat colour and shorter shelf life. In dairy cows, oxidative stress negatively impacts milk production and health. Cows under oxidative stress have increased incidence of mastitis, higher somatic cells count, poor responses to vaccination, decreased fertility, increased embryo mortality, abortion, premature calving, retained foetal membranes, and uterine infections. Furthermore, oxidative stress also affects sperm concentration and viability in males3,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. It’s clear that heat stress has real potential for devastating losses in terms of both performance and production – but the good news is that it can be effectively managed. Virbac Australia advises farmers and producers to act now and will be running free webinars on ways to minimise the impact of heat stress in livestock over summer. A pre-summer review of preparedness for heat stress is a great idea. This should include an examination of the livestock environment, including site characteristics, infrastructure and condition, to provide good shade and water sources, and even fans and sprinklers in intensive production environments. “Adequate water is essential,” Dr Gonzalez-Rivas explains. “It's worth remembering that animals under heat stress lose much more water through respiration and perspiration, often requiring up to five times more water than usual.” Having a good summer nutrition program that includes trace mineral supplementation is also key. Dr Gonzalez-Rivas recommends using a trace-mineral injection like Multimin injection to improve antioxidant activity “Antioxidants are an ideal heat stress abatement strategy, and Multimin adds important trace minerals like manganese, zinc, selenium and copper, to help boost antioxidants, reproductive performance and immune function4, 5. We also recommend increasing energy density to compensate for reduced feed intake,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas – “including slowly fermentable starch to reduce the amount of heat released in the rumen during fermentation6, as well as supplemental fat that bypasses the rumen and minimises the heat released during digestion.” High-quality forage and fibre also help optimise rumen efficiency and function, particularly for animals receiving high starch diets. If supplementary feeding, modify this strategy from once to twice-a-day feeding, and consider feeding less during the hotter hours and more at night, to allow heat dissipation7. It can also be beneficial to balance the mineral and electrolyte content, because excessive sweating or panting results in losses of sodium, potassium and bicarbonate, increasing the risks of acidosis and mineral imbalances. Victorian dairy farmer, Renee Murfett, is a big believer that it pays to be preventive rather than reactive when it comes to heat stress in cattle. “Summer can be harsh on our cows, so we make sure they’ve always got access to shade and water. We have a sprinkler system set up in our yard for hot days which not only cools the cows but also stops their frustration with flies. The first signs of heat stress we notice is heavy breathing and stock not wanting to move away from the shade. In more severe cases, they go down with exhaustion. We can lose anywhere from 500 to 1,000 litres of milk a day during a heat wave so Multimin is definitely something we are open to trialling in our cows during a heat stress event.” As Dr Gonzalez-Rivas concludes, “a proactive approach to the management of heat stress is more effective than a reactive response once it has occurred. Right now, is a great time to begin implementing the best processes to minimise the impact of what’s set to be another blisteringly hot Australian summer and I encourage all farmers and producers to register to our free webinars.” Get your livestock performance ready for summer. Sign up for the heat load index forecast, and heat stress alerts for beef cattle at chlt.com.au and for dairy cattle at dairy.katestone.com.au For more information and to register to the free webinars run by Virbac Australia, visit au.virbac.com/webinars Beef webinar: Thursday 31st October at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Dairy webinar: Thursday 5th December at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Ends MEDIA CONTACT Adam Arndell - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 adam.arndell@c7even.com.au [1] David Wolfenson, Zvi Roth, Impact of heat stress on cow reproduction and fertility, Animal Frontiers, Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages 32–38. 2 Fabris, T. F., Laporta, J., Skibiel, A. L., Corra, F. N., Senn, B. D., Wohlgemuth, S. E., & Dahl, G. E. (2019). Effect of heat stress during early, late, and entire dry period on dairy cattle. Journal of dairy science, 102(6), 5647-5656. 3 Celi P. (2011) Oxidative Stress in Ruminants. In: Mandelker L., Vajdovich P. (eds) Studies on Veterinary Medicine. Oxidative Stress in Applied Basic Research and Clinical Practice. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ 4 Machado, V. S., Oikonomou, G., Lima, S. F., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kacar, C., Foditsch, C., ... & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). The effect of injectable trace minerals (selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese) on peripheral blood leukocyte activity and serum superoxide dismutase activity of lactating Holstein cows. The Veterinary Journal, 200(2), 299-304. 5 Teixeira, A. G. V., Lima, F. S., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kussler, A., Lima, S. F., Felippe, M. J., & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). Effect of an injectable trace mineral supplement containing selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves. Journal of dairy science, 97(7), 4216-4226. 6 Gonzalez-Rivas, P. A., DiGiacomo, K., Russo, V. M., Leury, B. J., Cottrell, J. J., & Dunshea, F. R. (2016). Feeding slowly fermentable grains has the potential to ameliorate heat stress in grain-fed wethers. Journal of animal science, 94(7), 2981-2991. 7 Mader, T. L., Davis, M. S., & Brown-Brandl, T. (2006). Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle. Journal of Animal Science, 84(3), 712-719. Photo captions: Victorian Dairy Farmer Renee Murfett with Dr Susan Swaney Dairy cattle in Victoria Injectable trace minerals: a solution to combat livestock heat stress this summer 2019-10-06T20:30:00Z injectable-trace-minerals-a-solution-to-combat-livestock-heat-stress-this-summer With forecasts predicting another long hot summer ahead for northern regions, trace mineral supplementation is one effective solution to help combat heat stress in livestock over the coming months, says animal health company Virbac Australia. “High temperatures can affect everything from conception and fertility rates to immunity, meat quality and production loss, leading to significant economic impacts for producers,” reports Virbac Australia’s Technical Services Veterinarian Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas. “In extreme cases, it can even lead to livestock mortality.” Cattle begin feeling uncomfortable above 25°C – which means that heat stress will be an issue across all Australian livestock regions. For northern regions, high heat load resulting from more extreme humidity is an even greater problem. What’s often surprising is that it’s not only extremely high daytime temperatures that trigger heat stress. Warmer night times can have more of an impact, says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. “Hot nights can be dangerous for livestock, as it’s harder to thermoregulate, dissipate heat accumulated during the day, and reduce their core temperature. That places them under continuous stress, increasing respiration, heart rate and water intake, and placing a strain on multiple physiological processes. In fact, recent research has revealed air temperatures rising as little as just 1.5°C above average can decrease conception rates by as much as 5%1. Even before birth, calves suffer the negative consequences of heat stress if cows were heat stressed during late pregnancy2.” “Heat stress affects the animal’s oxidative status, it increases the production of free radicals and reduces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, leading to oxidative stress. In both beef cattle and sheep, oxidising agents present in the meat lead to lipid and protein peroxidation affecting muscle fibre structure, resulting in high drip loss, undesirable meat colour and shorter shelf life. For females, heat stress can also lead to much higher rates of embryo mortality, while also affecting sperm concentration and viability in males,” says Dr Gonzalez-Rivas. Livestock Compliance & Project Co-ordinator at Bindaree Beef Group, Corina Muckenschnabl, is a big believer that it pays to be preventive rather than reactive when it comes to heat stress in cattle. “Our pre-summer checklist always includes a review of our heat stress management plan where we conduct a risk assessment based on cattle breed and shade infrastructure at our Myola Feedlot in Northern New South Wales. The Cattle Heat Load Toolbox (CHLT) calculates our heat load index threshold to determine if our stock are at low or high risk for heat stress and allows us to proactively manage the risk of heat stress at our site. Although the CHLT alarms us via a text message when we may need to implement our heat stress management plan, we need to be prepared well before we hit our heat load index threshold.” It’s clear that heat stress has real potential for devastating losses in terms of both performance and production – but the good news is that it can be effectively managed. Virbac Australia advises farmers and producers to act now and will be running free webinars on ways to minimise the impact of heat stress in livestock over summer. A pre-summer review of preparedness for heat stress is a great idea. This should include an examination of the livestock environment, including site characteristics, infrastructure and condition, to provide good shade and water sources, and even fans and sprinklers in intensive production environments. “Adequate water is essential,” Dr Gonzalez-Rivas explains. “It's worth remembering that animals under heat stress lose much more water through respiration and perspiration, often requiring up to five times more water than usual.” Having a good summer nutrition program that includes trace mineral supplementation is also key. Dr Gonzalez-Rivas recommends using a trace-mineral injection like Multimin injection to improve antioxidant activity. Antioxidants are an ideal heat stress abatement strategy, and Multimin adds important trace minerals like manganese, zinc, selenium and copper, to help boost antioxidants, reproductive performance and immune function 3,4. We also recommend increasing energy density to compensate for reduced feed intake,” says Dr Gonzalez Rivas – “including slowly fermentable starch to reduce the amount of heat released in the rumen during fermentation5, as well as supplemental fat that bypasses the rumen and minimises the heat released during digestion.” High-quality forage and fibre also help optimise rumen efficiency and function, particularly for animals receiving high starch diets. If supplementary feeding, modify this strategy from once to twice-a-day feeding, and consider feeding less during the hotter hours and more at night, to allow heat dissipation6. It can also be beneficial to balance the mineral and electrolyte content, because excessive sweating or panting results in losses of sodium, potassium and bicarbonate, increasing the risks of acidosis and mineral imbalances. As Dr Gonzalez-Rivas concludes, “a proactive approach to the management of heat stress is more effective than a reactive response once it has occurred. Right now, is a great time to begin implementing the best processes to minimise the impact of what’s set to be another blisteringly hot Australian summer and I encourage all farmers and producers to register to our free webinars.” Get your livestock performance ready for summer. Sign up for the heat load index forecast, and heat stress alerts for beef cattle at chlt.com.au and for dairy cattle at dairy.katestone.com.au For more information and to register to the free webinars run by Virbac Australia, visit au.virbac.com/webinars Beef webinar: Thursday 31st October at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Dairy webinar: Thursday 5th December at 6.30pm-7.30pm AEDT Ends MEDIA CONTACT Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Dr Paula Gonzalez-Rivas during a cattle trial Beef cattle in Northern Australia [1] David Wolfenson, Zvi Roth, Impact of heat stress on cow reproduction and fertility, Animal Frontiers, Volume 9, Issue 1, January 2019, Pages 32–38, https://doi.org/10.1093/af/vfy027 2 Fabris, T. F., Laporta, J., Skibiel, A. L., Corra, F. N., Senn, B. D., Wohlgemuth, S. E., & Dahl, G. E. (2019). Effect of heat stress during early, late, and entire dry period on dairy cattle. Journal of dairy science, 102(6), 5647-5656. 3 Machado, V. S., Oikonomou, G., Lima, S. F., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kacar, C., Foditsch, C., ... & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). The effect of injectable trace minerals (selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese) on peripheral blood leukocyte activity and serum superoxide dismutase activity of lactating Holstein cows. The Veterinary Journal, 200(2), 299-304. 4 Teixeira, A. G. V., Lima, F. S., Bicalho, M. L. S., Kussler, A., Lima, S. F., Felippe, M. J., & Bicalho, R. C. (2014). Effect of an injectable trace mineral supplement containing selenium, copper, zinc, and manganese on immunity, health, and growth of dairy calves. Journal of dairy science, 97(7), 4216-4226. 5 Gonzalez-Rivas, P. A., DiGiacomo, K., Russo, V. M., Leury, B. J., Cottrell, J. J., & Dunshea, F. R. (2016). Feeding slowly fermentable grains has the potential to ameliorate heat stress in grain-fed wethers. Journal of animal science, 94(7), 2981-2991. 6 Mader, T. L., Davis, M. S., & Brown-Brandl, T. (2006). Environmental factors influencing heat stress in feedlot cattle. Journal of Animal Science, 84(3), 712-719. Parasite management roadshow tours Ballarat offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-18T23:18:36Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-ballarat-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Ballarat in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Ballarat event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Jim Gaylard from Trawalla, described his local event as “a good reminder on the advantages of early weaning and the importance of worm control in young stock. It emphasized the importance of maintaining pastures and worm burdens in younger animals. We’ve been using Cydectin Long Acting injection in our sheep for quite some years and we will now use it in our weaning program to keep our cattle worm free for 120 days and our pastures cleaner.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Ballarat on-farm demonstration Ballarat event attendees Parasite management roadshow tours Mortlake offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T21:43:04Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-mortlake-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Mortlake in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Mortlake event included an on-farm demonstration and presentation on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Mick Fitzgibbon from “Clogheen” described his local event as “a great opportunity for young and old to learn about best practice weaner management and animal health. As an older person in the industry, it’s always good to see these types of events so that the next generation of cattle producers can get an idea on best practice today. We’ve used Cydectin Long Acting injection for over 3 years to reduce our worm burden in our weaned calves and heifers that have just calved and we are very happy with the results we’re seeing.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Mortlake on-farm demonstration Parasite management roadshow tours Mt Gambier offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-16T03:56:17Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-mt-gambier-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshows last stop was in Mt Gambier in South Australia on Friday 13th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Mt Gambier event presentation covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Cameron Milich from “Coola Station”, Kongorong described his local event as “a very informative presentation especially when you’re there with other producers to bounce ideas off each other. We will endeavor to introduce these learnings into our weaning program and start using Cydectin Long Acting injection to give our weaners longer protection against worms.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Mt Gambier event attendees: Cameron Milich, Stephen Fisher from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac and Darcie Kuhl from Elders Parasite management roadshow tours Victoria & South Australia offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-15T23:31:20Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-victoria-south-australia-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Bairnsdale, Yea, Euroa, Kyneton, Ballarat, Mortlake, Hamilton, Coleraine and Mt Gambier last week. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The events on-farm demonstrations and presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Raelene Mold from “Barina”, Yea described her local event as “a good reminder of the importance of using the right products at the right time to get my weaners to their target weights quicker, and the importance of mineral supplementation with vaccinations. Keeping up with new product developments and having access to experts at these types of events is key to me getting the right information, ensuring I have the correct protocols in place to continue to produce a quality product to the market. Sometimes just having the reassurance that I am doing the right thing is all that is needed, you can never stop learning in this industry and that's why these events are so crucial to my learning.” Beef producer Craig Grant from Lindsay Murray Greys, Coleraine described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn about controlling worms at critical times. A lot of the time we can get stuck in seminars covering the theoretical side of things, so it was good to have a hands-on component of this event. We have been looking for a long acting product that is potent and persistent to control our worm burdens at critical times of the year and we are interested in the results Cydectin Long Acting injection will give us. We hope to reduce our worm burdens and take the stress out of animals during the colder months which is when they are challenged the most.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Yea event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Raelene Mold from Yea, Rob Inglis from Elders and John Purvis from Elders. Coleraine on-farm demonstration Coleraine event presentation Parasite management roadshow tours Coleraine & Hamilton offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-15T22:52:24Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-coleraine-hamilton-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Coleraine & Hamilton in Victoria on Thursday 12th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Coleraine & Hamilton events included an on-farm demonstration and presentations on the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Beef producer Craig Grant from Lindsay Murray Greys, Coleraine described his local event as “a great opportunity to learn about controlling worms at critical times. A lot of the time we can get stuck in seminars covering the theoretical side of things, so it was good to have a hands-on component of this event. We have been looking for a long acting product that is potent and persistent to control our worm burdens at critical times of the year and we are interested in the results Cydectin Long Acting injection will give us. We hope to reduce our worm burdens and take the stress out of animals during the colder months which is when they are challenged the most.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Coleraine on-farm demonstration Coleraine event presentation Hamilton event attendees - Rob Inglis, Andrew Mibus, Rod Evans and Dr Matthew Ball Parasite management roadshow tours Kyneton offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-12T02:52:56Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-kyneton-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Kyneton in Victoria on Wednesday 11th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Kyneton event presentation covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Dave Bassett from Lindley Property, Kyneton described his local event as “a great opportunity to hear from the experts about best practice weaner management. I have only ever used Cydectin Long Acting Injection for my sheep, so it was interesting to hear how to use it for my cattle to increase live weight gain.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Kyneton event: Dave Bassett from Lindley Property, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Rob Inglis from Elders, Adam Mitchell from Virbac and Michael Ellis from Elders. Parasite management roadshow tours Yea & Euroa offering key insights on weaner management best practice. 2019-09-10T21:27:55Z parasite-management-roadshow-tours-yea-euroa-offering-key-insights-on-weaner-management-best-practice With weaner parasite control being one of the most crucial management interventions for beef operations, leading animal health company Virbac has partnered with Elders Rural Services to run a week-long educational roadshow through country Victoria and South Australia. Hosted by Virbac Australia Technical Services Manager Dr Matthew Ball and Elders Livestock Production Manager Rob Inglis, the roadshow visited Yea and Euroa in Victoria on Tuesday 10th September. The roadshows mission has been to highlight strategic parasite management and product usage for optimal cattle production. According to Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA), internal parasite infestation is one of the most significant diseases faced by red meat producers in Australia. Calves are highly susceptible to worms, being yet to develop immunity – so burdens will typically be at their peak during this time. As Rob explains, the roadshow is “a great opportunity for cattle producers and veterinarians to improve their knowledge and understanding of best practice weaner management and product usage, to help control these highly damaging parasites.” The Yea and Euroa event presentations covered topics including the latest industry research and findings relating to weaner health and wellbeing, along with optimal drenching product strategies and end benefits. Presenting alongside Rob, Dr Matthew Ball revealed some valuable insights, explaining that the way a young heifer is cared for in both parasite control and nutrition will determine fertility during its lifespan. “Young cattle are much more prone to parasites than adult cattle, so we need to focus our best and most persistent drench treatments on these younger animals,” he explained. “We also need to use drenches at strategic times,” he added, “because that helps to not only remove parasites from the animal, but also reduces contamination from the paddock.” Attendee Raelene Mold from “Barina”, Yea described her local event as “a good reminder of the importance of using the right products at the right time to get my weaners to their target weights quicker, and the importance of mineral supplementation with vaccinations. Keeping up with new product developments and having access to experts at these types of events is key to me getting the right information, ensuring I have the correct protocols in place to continue to produce a quality product to the market. Sometimes just having the reassurance that I am doing the right thing is all that is needed, you can never stop learning in this industry and that's why these events are so crucial to my learning.” “Ultimately, it’s this type of information that will make a real difference in enhancing the productivity and profitability of a producer’s herd,” concludes Rob. “We’re pleased to be able to contribute our knowledge in this area, to help drive successful weaner management practices for Australia’s cattle producers.” To find out more about best practice weaner management, please visit au.virbac.com About the speakers: Rob Inglis Rob Inglis is the Livestock Production Manager at Elders Rural Services and has been with Elders for 10 years in Livestock Production. Rob spent 8 years as an Animal Nutritionist with NSW DPI, Charles Sturt University and Livestock Central. Dr Matthew Ball Dr Ball has 19 years experience helping cattle farmers in a range of clinical, advisory and research roles. His employment includes jobs in clinical practice, government and industry, and he’s also undertaken postgraduate qualifications in disease surveillance and education. Based on the northern rivers of NSW, Matthew is passionate about helping cattle farmers develop practical and profitable preventative health programs, helping them to understand how medicines work and the scientific differences between animal health products. Ends Media Enquiries: Kate Munsie - C7EVEN COMMUNICATIONS (02) 6766 4513 / 0421 935 843 kate.munsie@c7even.com.au Photo captions: Yea event: Matthew Grylls from Virbac, Dr Matthew Ball from Virbac, Raelene Mold from Yea, Rob Inglis from Elders and John Purvis from Elders.