The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2018-09-25T22:43:44Z IMC19 brings the future of science into focus 2018-09-25T22:43:44Z imc19-brings-the-future-of-science-into-focus-1 Critical discoveries and research that will help to transform health, science and industry are set to be the lasting legacy of the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), according to leaders of the scientific world. Held every four years, IMC19 saw more than 2,100 of the world’s top scientists and researchers from 48 countries come together at ICC Sydney to network, collaborate and discover the latest high-tech instrumentation and systems in microscopy and microanalysis. IMC19 also inspired the next generation of young scientists with its Schools Outreach Program, which welcomed 570 students from 19 schools. The program also featured a “Young Scientists Assembly” where 50 young scientists from around the world enjoyed the opportunity to discuss career planning with some of the most senior figures in the field. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, said the impact of IMC19 would be revealed over time from the global scientific community. “Innovations in microscopy enable us to extend our understanding of ourselves and the world around us. IMC19 brought together leaders in both the development and the application of microscopy in a huge range of disciplines,” he said. “These connections will ultimately lead to breakthroughs, as researchers take the insights from advanced microscopy to develop a treatment for cancer, a vaccine for a virus, or a new 3D printed metallurgical alloy that improves our atmosphere by being strong and light and thereby fuel and greenhouse gas efficient.” The week-long scientific program included presentations by four expert plenary speakers, two Nobel Laureates, 150 invited presenters as well as 26 pre-congress workshops and 463 oral talks, bridging the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. The pioneering IMC19 Outreach Learning Program welcomed high school students to experience the very latest light and electron microscope equipment and a chance to meet with researchers and specialists in microscopy. Mrs Diane Fairweather, Head of Science, Riverstone High School, said the program allowed students to access cutting-edge technology. “This was a great STEM initiative by IMC19 and an amazing experience for the students who came. We don’t have these microscopes at our school and without the IMC19 Outreach Program, most of our students wouldn’t be able to use this equipment,” said Fairweather. “Our students are engaged; they are learning directly from experts on things like using the lens to focus – it’s a real hands-on experience.” The Outreach Program offered students access to the latest equipment including, VR, four scanning electron microscopes, 20 life microscopes and 3D printing. Equipment and demonstrations were supported by Zeiss, Leica, AXT, Keepad Interactive, NewSpec, ATA, Coherent, UNSW Art and Design and Me3D. Citing recent examples of some of the life-changing advancements that have developed as a direct result of microscopy, Dr Alan Finkel, Australia’s Chief Scientist, inspired the audience at IMC19 and set the scene for a week of breakthroughs in his opening address. “An investment in this field (microscopy) is an investment in nanoparticles that target such things as a drug directly to malignant cells; 3D printed lattices that act like tiny factories for T-cells; vital in the new generation of cancer immunotherapies and more,” said Dr Finkel. “Without Microscopy, there is no modern science – end of story.” Professor Paul Munroe, Congress Co-Chair, said IMC19 had laid the foundations for great things. “We are excited to see where the collaborations from IMC19 take the industry, and what new technology and research will be showcased at the next congress in Korea in 2022,” he said. For more information on IMC19 visit: http://imc19.com. IMC19 brings the future of science into focus 2018-09-25T22:34:39Z imc19-brings-the-future-of-science-into-focus Critical discoveries and research that will help to transform health, science and industry are set to be the lasting legacy of the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), according to leaders of the scientific world. Held every four years, IMC19 saw more than 2,100 of the world’s top scientists and researchers from 48 countries come together at ICC Sydney to network, collaborate and discover the latest high-tech instrumentation and systems in microscopy and microanalysis. IMC19 also inspired the next generation of young scientists with its Schools Outreach Program, which welcomed 570 students from 19 schools. The program also featured a “Young Scientists Assembly” where 50 young scientists from around the world enjoyed the opportunity to discuss career planning with some of the most senior figures in the field. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, said the impact of IMC19 would be revealed over time from the global scientific community. “Innovations in microscopy enable us to extend our understanding of ourselves and the world around us. IMC19 brought together leaders in both the development and the application of microscopy in a huge range of disciplines” he said. “These connections will ultimately lead to breakthroughs, as researchers take the insights from advanced microscopy to develop a treatment for cancer, a vaccine for a virus, or a new 3D printed metallurgical alloy that improves our atmosphere by being strong and light and thereby fuel and greenhouse gas efficient.” The week-long scientific program included presentations by four expert plenary speakers, two Nobel Laureates, 150 invited presenters as well as 26 pre-congress workshops and 463 oral talks, bridging the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. The pioneering IMC19 Outreach Learning Program welcomed high school students to experience the very latest light and electron microscope equipment and a chance to meet with researchers and specialists in microscopy. Mrs Diane Fairweather, Head of Science, Riverstone Highschool, said the program allowed students to access cutting-edge technology. “This was a great STEM initiative by IMC19 and an amazing experience for the students who came. We don’t have these microscopes at our school and without the IMC19 Outreach Program, most of our students wouldn’t be able to use this equipment,” said Fairweather. “Our students are engaged; they are learning directly from experts on things like using the lens to focus – it’s a real hands-on experience.” The Outreach Program offered students access to the latest equipment including, VR, four scanning electron microscopes, 20 life microscopes and 3D printing. Equipment and demonstrations were supported by Zeiss, Leica, AXT, Keepad Interactive, NewSpec, ATA, Coherent, UNSW Art and Design and Me3D. Citing recent examples of some of the life-changing advancements that have developed as a direct result of microscopy, Dr Alan Finkel, Australia’s Chief Scientist, inspired the audience at IMC19 and set the scene for a week of breakthroughs in his opening address. “An investment in this field (microscopy) is an investment in nanoparticles that target such things as a drug directly to malignant cells; 3D printed lattices that act like tiny factories for T-cells; vital in the new generation of cancer immunotherapies and more,” said Dr Finkel. “Without Microscopy, there is no modern science – end of story.” Professor Paul Munroe, Congress Co-Chair, said IMC19 had laid the foundations for great things. “We are excited to see where the collaborations from IMC19 take the industry, and what new technology and research will be showcased at the next congress in Korea in 2022,” he said. For more information on IMC19 visit: http://imc19.com. Images: IMC19 Outreach Learning Program: Notes to editors: Interviews with Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, IMC19 Interviews with Professor Paul Munroe, Congress Co-Chair, IMC 19 Media enquires contact Zadro Sinead Andrews | Account Coordinator | Zadro 02 9212 7867 | sinead@zadroagency.com.au Elizabeth Williams | Group Account Director | Zadro 02 9212 7867 | elizabeth@zadroagency.com.au NOTE: About the 19th International Microscopy Congress, 9 – 14 September 2018 Held once every four years, the International Microscopy Congress (IMC) is the preeminent meeting for researchers, practitioners, decision makers, national microscopy societies, industry partners and stakeholders involved in microscopy sciences from all over the world. Now in its 19th year, IMC19 ‘Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences’ is the only platform to bring together international, national and local professionals to discover new opportunities, uncover findings, learn techniques, collaborate with peers, and network with global leaders in the field of microscopy. About the Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) The Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) is Australia’s industry association for the promotion, co-operation and development of microscopy, microanalysis, and related techniques across a broad range of scientific disciplines. About the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM) The International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM) comprises microscopy societies from all around the world to contribute to the advancement of microscopy in all its aspects. Microscope that gets to the heart of matter 2018-09-10T03:41:58Z microscope-that-gets-to-the-heart-of-matter Two Nobel Laureates and the NSW Chief Scientist & Engineer will officially unveil a vital piece of scientific infrastructure at the University of Sydney at a special event. The Thermo Fisher Themis-Z transmission electron microscope (TEM) has the highest resolution of any microscope in Australia. Its addition to the University of Sydney will provide researchers with unparalleled access to the mysteries of the atomic structure of materials. The 4.5-metre tall microscope is housed in the purpose-built $150 million Sydney Nanoscience Hub in a room that is shielded from electromagnetic interferences and ‘floats’ architecturally independent from the building to minimise vibrations. The resolution of this analysis technique is breathtaking. The machine can obtain images with resolution better than 0.06 billionths of a metre (0.06 nanometres). That is about 10 times smaller than the distance between silicon atoms or five times smaller than the distance between carbon atoms in diamond. The microscope, which is available for industry as well, also has applications in geosciences, mining, chemical and mechanical engineering. The new NSW Chief Scientist & Engineer, Professor Hugh Durrant-Whyte will unveil the device in his first week of his official functions alongside two Nobel Laureates in Chemistry, Prof. Dan Shechtman, The Technion, Israel and Professor Joachim Frank, Columbia University, USA, who are visiting Sydney for the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), which is jointly hosted by the University of Sydney and UNSW. Event details: What: Sydney Microscopy and Microanalysis launch event Aberration-corrected Transmission Electron Microscope Where: Research Foyer, Sydney Nanoscience Hub, Physics Road, University of Sydney When: Tuesday, 11 September 2018. 1.45pm for 2pm start. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9-14 September, at ICC Sydney, will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. Complimentary media passes to the launch event are available; apply by sending your name, position and publication title to sinead@zadroagency.com.au. Complimentary media passes to IMC19 are also available; apply by sending your name, position and publication title to sinead@zadroagency.com.au. Image: The Thermo Fisher Themis-Z transmission electron microscope (TEM) How many scientists does it take to look through a microscope? 2018-09-06T02:03:09Z how-many-scientists-does-it-take-to-look-through-a-microscope More than 2,000 of the world’s top scientific brains will explore new findings, share research, and experience the latest state-of-the-art scientific microscopy equipment helping to reinvent and expand human knowledge, in Sydney next week. Field emission guns and new electron exploration systems are two of the many innovations and leading advancements in medical science that will be on show when the world’s largest microscopic community descends on Sydney for the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19). The event, held every four years, starts on 9 September and will see presentations by world-renowned thought leaders and Nobel Laureates Professor Dan Shechtman and Professor Joachim Frank, from The Technion Israel, who won the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work as founder of the single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). By bringing together experts working across a multitude of academic and industrial fields, IMC19 will showcase - and define - how clear, crisp microscopic magnification, helps advance life on Earth. The genesis of our future’s most significant discoveries including reproductive breakthroughs and a step towards a cure for cancer can be found at this world-famous science event and the multi-million-dollar equipment on display. Tek-Event, Sydney based manufacturer of equipment dedicated to the field of human and animal reproductive technologies (ART), will showcase its range of brand new technologies providing a safe environment for tissue observation. Dieter Regel, Sales Director, Tek-Event, commented on the increasing requirement to provide accurate temperature control as well as CO2 and humidity in the latest technologies advancing human IVF laboratories, animal research and veterinary ART facilities. “Researchers who have the requirement to view cells or tissue microscopically, are often challenged when their environment is not stable. TEK-Event are excited to showcase our latest Cell-Tek microscope chambers, which helps create a controlled environment for examination in many fields of research, including the handling of oocytes and embryos in ART,” said Regel. Thermo Fisher Scientific will offer attendees a chance to take part in live demonstrations with technical experts working in innovative software and automated microscopy products and showcase a wide range of microscopy solutions. Attendees can register for a learning lunch with ZEISS, to experience their innovative microscopy technologies and applications. Sessions will cover 3D electron microscopy; X-ray microscopy and analytical microscopy and guests can win a ZEISS VR One Plus virtual reality headset. Tek-Event, Thermo Fisher Scientific and ZEISS will be joined by over 60 other confirmed exhibitors at IMC19, including Jeol, Quorum Technologies, Tescan, Technoorg Linda Co Ltd, Delmic, Hitachi, Leica and Nano Technologies Solutions. Delegates will also enjoy a range of activities and a vibrant social program in conjunction with the congress, aimed to engage attendees and help spark new connections among the scientific community. The IMC19 Outreach Learning Program will host 21 schools across Australia, to offer students the chance to undertake four storyline-based challenges, featuring the latest light and microscopy equipment alongside leading researchers and instrument specialists. Microscopy Australia will present a unique exhibition during the congress, Stories & Structures - New Connections, bringing together microscopy and Indigenous art through visual and story-telling parallels. The exhibition will showcase 21 artworks and 24 micrographs, as well as feature live painting by Indigenous artist Kurun Warun in residence. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9-14 September, at ICC Sydney, will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. Exposing “serial killers”, Quasi-Periodic Materials, and Sub-particles at IMC19 Sydney 2018-08-06T04:14:11Z exposing-serial-killers-quasi-periodic-materials-and-sub-particles-at-imc19-sydney Examining ‘serial killer’ cells and their behaviour will be at the centre of leading Australian Immunologist, Dr Misty Jenkins’, plenary talk - Understanding Serial Killers: Investigating the Function of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes using Microscopy’ at IMC19 in Sydney next month. Approximately 1,600 Australians are diagnosed with brain cancer each year. Dr Misty Jenkins, NHMRC RD Wright Fellow and Laboratory Head at Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, is seeking to change that, and will share how microscopy is directing her research into fighting brain cancer. Ahead of the IMC19 Congress, Dr Jenkins shares how her research is using imaging to understand how killer T-cells in the immune system could be modified to develop a cure for brain cancer. “T-cells are like the snipers of the immune system, they take out very specific targets and throw grenades at them to make them blow up. These cells are genetically designed to kill cancer cells, and we image this process to uncover new insights into the behaviour of these engineered killers,” said Dr Jenkins. With a series of accolades including the L’Oréal for Women in Science Fellowship (2013) and the Westpac/Australian Financial Review Top100 Women of Influence Award (2016), Ballarat-born Dr Jenkins is a testament to the high calibre of scientists that will be representing Australia at the Congress. It is such an exciting time for science, and this is our chance to show the world the great work we are doing on our own shores. But it is also a rare and unique opportunity to collaborate with, learn from and share the stage with renowned scientists from across the globe,” said Dr Jenkins. Dr Jenkins will be joined by the world’s most prominent plenary speakers including: Nobel Laureate Professor Dan Shechtman, from Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, presenting on The Discovery of Quasi-Periodic Materials – The Role of TEM Associate Professor Jennifer Dionne, from Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford, USA, who recently featured on Oprah Winfrey’s list of “50 things that will make you say ‘Wow’!” with In Situ Visualisation of Photochemical Transformations at the Single and Sub-particle Level Professor Zhiwei Shan, from Xi’an Jiaotong University, China, who has published over 70 prestigious papers and presented more than 130 invited talks discussing Mechanical Testing Laboratory Inside TEM The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9-14 September, at ICC Sydney, will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. To register and for more information: http://imc19.com Image: Dr. Misty Jenkins, Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, Australia Professor Dan Shechtman, The Technion, Israel Assoc. Prof. Jennifer Dionne, Stanford, USA Prof. Zhiwei Shan, Xi’an Jiaotong University, China Bridging the Sciences at the 19th International Microscopy Congress 2018-06-03T23:56:20Z bridging-the-sciences-at-the-19th-international-microscopy-congress Sydney will host Nobel Laureates Professor Dan Shechtman, from Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and Professor Joachim Frank, from Columbia University, USA together with global authorities at the world’s largest and most diverse gathering of microscopy and microanalysis professionals at the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9 – 14 September 2018, in Sydney. Hosted by the internationally renowned Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) and the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM), IMC19 will shine a light on Australia’s significant and exciting contribution to a collaborative, multidisciplinary industry that affects everyone’s lives - every single day. IMC19 will also welcome local and international visionaries, including Dr Misty Jenkins, Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, Australia, Associate Professor Jennifer Dionne, Stanford University, USA, and Professor Zhiwei Shan, Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. They, together with the world’s scientific leaders will debate and discuss the latest insights and approaches in policy, research and programs relevant to practitioners, providers, government and academia. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, IMC19 said it was an honour to be highlighting the work Australians are doing in microscopy to the world through this highly coveted event. “IMC19 has an impressive line-up of global thought leaders set to challenge and explore the latest technology and practices in microscopy. “However, this is Australia’s scientific community’s chance to shine and we believe our international peers will be pleasantly surprised by the amount and depth of advancements happening on our shores. “The exhibition floor will be awash with cutting-edge technology, imaging techniques and state-of-the-art products and services from around Australia and the globe, that are destined to transform our understanding of the world around us. “The Congress is the only one of its kind, crucial for bringing together the brightest scientific and technical minds to collaborate, cross-pollinate and bridge disciplines,” said Ringer. IMC19 is offering 50 young scientists an opportunity to attend an unmissable platform to network with experts in their field, the IFSM Young Scientists Assembly. Held on 9 September 2018 at the University of Sydney, they will meet, discuss and learn from academic and industry leaders. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19) will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. To register and for more information: http://imc19.com Australian Scientists Under the Microscope 2018-05-22T22:30:00Z australian-scientists-under-the-microscope Sydney will host Nobel Laureates Professor Dan Shechtman, from Technion - Israel Institute of Technology and Professor Joachim Frank, from Columbia University, USA together with global authorities at the world’s largest and most diverse gathering of microscopy and microanalysis professionals at the 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19), 9 – 14 September 2018, in Sydney. Hosted by the internationally renowned Australian Microscopy & Microanalysis Society (AMMS) and the International Federation of Societies for Microscopy (IFSM), IMC19 will shine a light on Australia’s significant and exciting contribution to a collaborative, multidisciplinary industry that affects everyone’s lives - every single day. IMC19 will also welcome local and international visionaries, including Dr Misty Jenkins, Walter Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, Australia, Associate Professor Jennifer Dionne, Stanford University, USA, and Professor Zhiwei Shan, Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. They, together with the world’s scientific leaders will debate and discuss the latest insights and approaches in policy, research and programs relevant to practitioners, providers, government and academia. Professor Simon Ringer, Congress Chair, IMC19 said it was an honour to be highlighting the work Australians are doing in microscopy to the world through this highly coveted event. “IMC19 has an impressive line-up of global thought leaders set to challenge and explore the latest technology and practices in microscopy. “However, this is Australia’s scientific community’s chance to shine and we believe our international peers will be pleasantly surprised by the amount and depth of advancements happening on our shores. “The exhibition floor will be awash with cutting-edge technology, imaging techniques and state-of-the-art products and services from around Australia and the globe, that are destined to transform our understanding of the world around us. “The Congress is the only one of its kind, crucial for bringing together the brightest scientific and technical minds to collaborate, cross-pollinate and bridge disciplines,” said Ringer. IMC19 is offering 50 young scientists an opportunity to attend an unmissable platform to network with experts in their field, the IFSM Young Scientists Assembly. Held on 9 September 2018 at the University of Sydney, they will meet, discuss and learn from academic and industry leaders. The 19th International Microscopy Congress (IMC19) will centre around the theme, Microscopy: Bridging the Sciences, promoting collaboration across the primary streams of Frontier Issues; Instrumentation and Techniques; Physical and Life Sciences. To register and for more information: http://imc19.com