The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2019-11-18T03:48:23Z NSW and ACT Guiding Community merges with NT to create A Place To Grow Together 2019-11-18T03:48:23Z nsw-and-act-guiding-community-merges-with-nt-to-create-a-place-to-grow-together The NSW & ACT Girl Guides community will merge with Girl Guides NT to form Girl Guides NSW, ACT and NT from January 2020 creating a 7,800 strong member organisation. The merger offers a chance to expand learnings and foster collaboration between the state and territories. Girl Guides in NT will have access to greater resources and opportunities through this partnership, with all the administrative and operational benefits of a larger Association. More opportunities will be available to assist with the geographical challenges faced in the NT. The partnership will also allow Guides in the NT to participate in creative initiatives run by Girl Guides NSW & ACT such as GirlMade which supports girls to express themselves creatively. The NT community hope to share their unique experiences and perspectives with the NSW & ACT members, to further support the growth and empowerment of the next generation of Australian women. Letitia Baldwin, NT Regional Manager, Girl Guides NT, is looking forward to this new step in NT Guiding history, believing it will bring great benefit to the girls and Leaders. “I have a brilliant team of Leaders and we will work well with the NSW and ACT teams. It is important to have fresh ideas and the chance to network, especially for our adult members so they can share that with the girls. I want to make this community as big and beautiful as it can be. “I think the opportunities are going to be endless; NSW & ACT have an exciting range of things for girls to do and now we will be able to leverage this and get the girls involved in so many more activities. “It is great to know we’re not alone; we are a part of a large network. I am looking forward to NT standing proud and showing off what we can do,” said Ms Baldwin. Eboney Prentice, Leader Darwin District, Girl Guides NT, has been a member of the Guiding community for 30 years; having had many unique experiences with Guiding including travelling the world, she is now sharing the Guiding experience with her daughter. “Guiding focuses on the community, it encourages girls to think about more than just themselves, to learn from others and give back to the world around them. The joining of our communities will support this Guiding mission and enhance the girls experience,” said Ms Prentice. Sarah Neill, State Commissioner, Girl Guides NSW & ACT, travelled to NT earlier this year and met the Guiding community; she is thrilled to be partnering with them. “I am looking forward to working closely with Letitia and her team who have such a deep passion for Guiding. The girls as always are at the centre of what we do and we know this partnership will enhance their Guiding experience with increased support,” said Mrs Neill. -ENDS- Notes to editor: Girl Guides NSW, ACT & NT are devoted to the growth and development of girls. They provide a place where girls can learn, build their skills and connect with like-minded peers. The benefits also extend to the Leaders and volunteers who play a vital role in supporting the girls. Guides work to serve their community and help those in need offering help where they can. They participate in many local activities and initiatives aimed at giving back to the community. Girl Guides NSW, ACT & NT offers girls A Place To Grow. For media enquiries please contact: Simone Gur | ZADRO Agency | simone@zadroagency.com.au | 0417 778 511 Oakley Grioli I ZADRO Agency I oakley@zadroagency.com.au | 02 9212 7867 IMAGES Images are available for use. For high-resolution images, please contact: oakley@zadroagency.com.au Image: Letitia Baldwin, NT Region manager, Girl Guides NSW, ACT & NT. Image: Eboney Prentice, Unit Leader Darwin District, Girl Guides NSW, ACT & NT. Image: Sarah Neill, State Commissioner, Girl Guides NSW, ACT & NT. Image: Girl Guides NT. Image: Girl Guides NSW & ACT. Mothers and Daughters Who Girl Guide Together Stay Connected 2019-08-18T22:55:10Z mothers-and-daughters-who-girl-guide-together-stay-connected Girl Guides isn’t just for young girls, as mum and daughter duo discovered when Grace Jarvis now 17, enrolled in her local Girl Guides Unit 10 years ago. Instead of just drop-offs and pick-ups, mum Helen Jarvis became a Leader of the Unit and hasn’t looked back. The connection that Helen enjoys with her daughter Grace has a lot to do with the shared understanding and language they have developed through Guiding. Helen and Grace have navigated the distinction between their relationship as mother and daughter and guiding colleagues, by using the mentoring approaches taught at Girl Guides. “I don’t provide answers, just a thought process that encourages Grace to take the initiative and come up with a pathway for herself,” explains Helen. Helen says this shared language and approach has been one of the largest benefits of being a part of her daughter’s Guiding experience. “It's not the doing it together all the time that’s the lovely thing, it's the common language, shared experience and interest which is great. It is one thing to hear about the stories, and another to be there sharing them.” Their relationship and Guiding experience continue to strengthen with Grace now being a Leader alongside her mum. Grace has developed a new appreciation for the hard work her mum has put into leading their Unit over the years. Grace admits: “We make a pretty good team”. Grace has not only experienced great personal growth during her time at Guides she has also been able to see her mum from other people’s perspectives which she is grateful for. “She took on a female role-model position in my life where she was my teacher and my guide through this incredible journey. “So, when people ask me who is your biggest role model, it doesn’t feel weird to say, ‘my mum’ – because in all aspects she is.” The Jarvis family could not be prouder to be a part of the Guiding community appreciating the confidence and strength it has provided them as a family unit. Grace’s younger sister, Amy also joined Guides and has enjoyed building the same bond with her mum. Grace says it best when explaining why this dynamic works so well in the Guiding community: “At Guides, we are an absolute sisterhood and have an underlying acceptance of each other. So, no matter who you are, you're automatically going to be accepted whole-heartedly into this environment of pure joy, fun and learning.” -ENDS- For Media Enquiries please contact: Felicity Zadro I ZADRO Agency I felicity@zadroagency.com.au 0404 009 384 Oakley Grioli I ZADRO Agency I oakley@zadroagency.com.au 02 9212 7867 IMAGES Images are available for use. For high-resolution images, please contact: oakley@zadroagency.com.au Image: Helen & Grace Jarvis. Image: A Place To Grow Campaign. Image: A Place To Grow Logo ‘School pressure, family life, digital identity, increased expectations’: the reason Girl Guides exists today 2019-04-30T21:43:54Z school-pressure-family-life-digital-identity-increased-expectations-the-reason-girl-guides-exists-today Girl Guides NSW & ACT will focus on the role Guiding plays in supporting young girls navigate school pressures, family life, digital identity and raised expectations with the launch of a new campaign called A Place To Grow to coincide with May - Girl Guides Month. This vital piece of communication to young girls, their families and thousands of active and potential volunteers, will highlight the diverse experiences on offer and its relevance for the young girls of today. Sarah Neill, State Commissioner said that Girl Guides provides a place for young people to feel secure. “We come together over a variety of activities, build confidence and resilience which makes our young people better able to cope with their lives. “We encourage our girls to build life skills, and have the freedom to be adventurous, learn strong communication skills, laugh, and make life-long friendships,” said Commissioner Neill. Ella Ezergailis, aged 12, was inspired to join Girl Guides after hearing her mother’s stories of Guiding and wanted her share of adventure and fun. In 2018, Ella became the youngest Girl Guide to take part in ‘Girl Takeover Parliament’ event, in which she watched Question Time in the Chamber of the House of Representatives. Disgusted by the behaviour, Ella wrote a letter to Prime Minister Scott Morrison telling him so. “I decided to write to the Prime Minister and ask him to change the culture in Parliament House. I told him he should visit my school to learn how to behave respectfully. “My letter was shared around the world on social media and was reported by news outlets. “Girl Guides has given me the confidence to do such a thing, however the result made me feel that a 12-year-old girl’s voice was important, and girls do have the power to change the world,” said Ella. Now in its 99th year, Girl Guides in NSW & ACT has 7,400 members across 540 Units. Comissioner Neill said recent research revealed that 90% of girls joined the organisation before the age of 11 and stayed because it provided the perfect antidote to the complex and pressured lives of young people. “Our research showed that young girls join for the things they need most at this stage of their lives: fun, meeting friends outside of school and developing new skills. “Parents said they wanted their daughters to join to help them build their confidence, meet new friends and have a community orientation to their life. “Our programs offer a connection to experiences and community that schools and busy families can’t. “We have large scale events and the traditional jamboree, but mostly girls choose their own activities to complete, from creative pursuits to sailing, coding to cooking, orientation to fundraising,” said Commissioner Neill. A Place To Grow will use the 540 Units of Girl Guides NSW & ACT, to promote the stories of resilience, confidence building and friendship it encourages, through social media, local press, local events such as school fetes and Girl Guides own Come and Try nights. Helen White, CEO said, the grass-roots approach is what Girl Guides excel at. “Over 1,000,000 Australians are or have been a Girl Guide. We work at the local level, in communities and across regions supporting and empowering the women of tomorrow. “There is a resurgence of interest in Girl Guides, as young people and their families look at ways to combat the pressures of busy and digital lives. We’re all about supporting someone to find their own path, to build resilience, and life skills to take them wherever they wish,” said Ms White. However, is Girl Guides still relevant for the girls of today? Ella says that it is. “Girl Guides is even more relevant to young people growing up with a digital life. “Girl Guides teaches you how to interact socially, be a responsible citizen, how to deal with emergency situations and gives you the courage to accept challenges. “I even went on camp for a week without my phone, and I survived.” More information: www.aplacetogrow.org.au