The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2004-05-03T17:28:00Z Singapore office for RSP Group 2004-05-03T17:28:00Z singapore-office-for-rsp-group Focus on security solutions, wireless telecoms and project management specialists Requests from two clients in Australia for RSP Group to provide recruitment brokerage services in Singapore are behind RSPs decision to open an office there in July, 04. Matt Lodge, CEO and chairman of RSP Group, said the new office had contracts to immediately place 40 permanent mid to senior executives across management, sales and tech development. The new office will be headed by RSP Group director, Crispin Baynes, until handover to a Singapore country manager within three months. The new office is expected to generate $3 million in permanent billings within the first 12 months. According to Matt Lodge the move is an endorsement of the value-add recruitment broker business model that produces higher calibre candidates, faster and more efficiently than traditional methods. The Singapore office will leverage RSPs existing recruitment competences and expand our broker partner base which features strong databases of specialised ICT people. The RSP Group Singapore office will become a hub for the Region and provide cross frontier recruitment opportunities for employers and candidates. He said job opportunities were growing in security, wireless technology, and project management. We are seeing stronger demand for technical sales people in Australia and Singapore. This is expected to increase further over the next 12 months, he said. RSP Group has offices in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane as well as 45 broker partners, and 600 contract staff placed with clients throughout Australia. About RSP Group RSP Group is Australias leading recruitment broker and human resource company. RSP Group takes a more effective and more valuable approach to recruitment. As a result, RSP has become successful in areas where employers and candidates have been poorly served and competition has become complacent. About recruitment brokerage Recruitment Broker: Establishes a network of supplying agents, signs them to a common contract then goes to market offering employer clients access to multiple candidate databases. A recruitment broker continually seeks to develop a network of agents, especially those in specialist areas, and in doing so increases the scope to identify high quality candidates. A broker is not the sole supplier to an employer client. They complement existing preferred suppliers. Brokers offer complete transparency across employment markets. Brokers encourage open dialogue and are seen as an independent filter in the employment market. For candidates, a recruitment broker provides: Wider access to the career marketplace Better chances of acquiring good career opportunities Higher exposure to available quality jobs Master Vendor/Managing Agent: A single recruitment supplier that secures client business exclusively on the understanding that a small group of secondary suppliers will be used if the master vendor cannot fill requirements. The supplier is usually reluctant to do this as there are financial incentives to keep all business to themselves. Communication is not open and the client-employer does not benefit from instant access to multiple candidate databases. Industry shakeup expected following entry of RSP Group into the engineering recruitment sector 2003-08-11T18:42:00Z industry-shakeup-expected-following-entry-of-rsp-group-into-the-engineering-recruitment-sector * Recruitment broker model provides higher efficiencies and better jobs * RSP places nine engineers in first weeks of operation and plans for 100 placements in 12 months * Strong demand for service technicians with good customer communication skills * Overall engineering jobs market is strong - advertised online vacancies in July up 7 per cent on June and 20 per cent up on previous six months The recent entry of RSP Group, Australia's largest recruitment broker, into the engineering sector is expected to have a major impact on the way engineers are recruited in Australia. RSP has won 17 contracts in its first few weeks of operation from companies including Crown Equipment, Visy Packaging, Nichiyu, Grundfos Pumps and Mander-Toyota. It has placed nine engineers in roles ranging from technical service engineers to specialist equipment makers across the materials handling, mining, and automotive sectors. This strong industry support has led RSP to seek placements for 100 engineers over the next 12 months. Currently in strong demand are service technicians with good customer communication skills to work in the after sales service markets. According to RSP, the market for engineering jobs is strong with advertised online vacancies in July up 7 per cent on June, and 20 per cent up on the period six months before. However, the number of engineering jobs is still 8 per cent lower than at this time last year. In numbers, there were 2,477 engineering jobs posted last month on SEEK.com, and 4,310 jobs in the light industrial sector. The RSP Group Engineering and Light Industrial Division is headed by Mr Chris O'Brien who was recruited by RSP from the UK to take up his role. He is supported by three other RSP recruitment specialists. The Chairman and CEO of RSP Group, Matt Lodge, said the recruitment broker model adopted by RSP enabled it to locate the right engineer for the right job much faster than traditional methods. "It provides us with the flexibility and resources to produce the sort of results once thought only possible with the larger recruitment companies," he said. "RSP provides cost benefits the larger recruiters cannot match without taking a loss." RSP Group has enjoyed strong growth since it commenced operations four years ago. During the past year it has placed an average of 160 people per month and reports an annualised turnover of $9.6 million up from $6 million in the corresponding period. Earlier this year it won the contract to place 600 people required for the launch of Hutchison Telecom's 3 and mobile multi-media services - the largest contract of its type in Australia According to Mr Lodge, recruitment brokerage was developed out of the technology and engineering IT recruitment markets in the US and UK. It emerged from a saturation of recruitment agencies in the marketplace all vying for a piece of the recruitment market, and a recognition that engaging one recruitment agency to find candidates for important roles is fundamentally not a very efficient business model. "RSP Group essentially offers its clients a single point of contact, a quality candidate filtering process, and broader marketplace access. This access is achieved through a network of alliance partnerships with 25 - 40 other recruitment companies. The broker manages the client relationship, while the alliance partners conduct the search. It is a collaborative process that maximises the client's search resources without involving the need to brief numerous competing agencies," he said. The acceptance of RSP Group and recruitment brokerage owes much to its ability to provide business with higher quality service, greater value from the recruitment investment, and fewer gatekeepers. - Ends - About recruitment brokerage Recruitment Broker: Establishes a network of supplying agents, signs them to a common contract then goes to market offering employer clients access to multiple candidate databases. A recruitment broker continually seeks to develop a network of agents, especially those in specialist areas, and in doing so increases the scope to identify high quality candidates. A broker is not the sole supplier to an employer client. They complement existing preferred suppliers. Brokers offer complete transparency across employment markets. Brokers encourage open dialogue and are seen as an independent filter in the employment market. For candidates, a recruitment broker provides: Wider access to the career marketplace Better chances of acquiring good career opportunities Higher exposure to available quality jobs Master Vendor/Managing Agent: A single recruitment supplier that secures client business exclusively on the understanding that a small group of secondary suppliers will be used if the master vendor cannot fill requirements. The supplier is usually reluctant to do this as there are financial incentives to keep all business to themselves. Communication is not open and the client-employer does not benefit from instant access to multiple candidate databases.