The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2014-11-28T04:29:43Z Recycling Stations for Local Government 2014-11-28T04:29:43Z recycling-stations-for-local-government ECOACTIV is launching a new cost effective collection station in January 2015. This low-cost product is the ideal system for managing Household Problem Wastes such as handheld batteries, light bulbs, fluoro tubes, printer cartridges and mobile phones. The recycling stations have been developed to meet the needs of local councils, and are ideally suited to council foyers, service centres, libraries, community houses and educational institutions.  The range of modular recycling stations feature both indoor and outdoor models, and can be configured and manufactured from a variety of materials, according to your organisation’s requirements. The opportunity to ensure council branding is also straightforward.  The stations are based on the highly innovative program initiated by the City of Sydney. ECOACTIV has been working collaboratively with Hal Dobbins and the City of Sydney team to implement a range of innovative recycling solutions, which include user-friendly recycling receptacles. “Our work with the ECOACTIV team has helped ensure that the delivery of practical recycling solutions for problem wastes is uncomplicated and community-friendly. Operational experience and managing specialist recyclers is a major strength with the ECOACTIV team and this directly benefits the City of Sydney initiative.” Hal Dobbins – Zero Waste Coordinator, City of Sydney  ECOACTIV Product Recovery Programs are managed by Infoactiv, a leading supply chain and environmental stewardship services organisation operating across the Asia Pacific region. Infoactiv's Environmental Management System has been independently certified to ISO 14001. Feel free to ring or email and we can talk about pricing, materials and features ahead of the launch in January 2015. You can download our Recycling Stations brochure here. More information Michael Dudley – Business Development Infoactiv Tel:  (03) 8892 3927 Email:  michael.dudley  at  infoactiv.com National Recycling Week at ECOACTIV 2014-11-11T00:13:53Z national-recycling-week-at-ecoactiv ECOACTIV is taking action in support of this year’s National Recycling Week. The aim is to maximise environmental benefits through increased community recycling.   Recycle Your E-waste   We are partnering up with three different councils to host electronic waste recycling events. These one-day community events are open to residents to drop off their unwanted electronics, such as computers, televisions, stereos, printers and fax machines for free. The waste collected will contribute to the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme.   Events supported by ECOACTIV and council include: Marrickville Council on Saturday November 8 at the Marrickville Council Works depot Parramatta Council on Saturday November 15 at the Parramatta Council Works depot Hobson’s Bay Council on Saturday November 15 at the Hobsons Bay City Council depot   ECOACTIV is also supporting the City of Ryde’s Schools eWaste Challenge, running from November 10-16. For more detail, visit the City of Ryde’s website.    Recycle Your Handheld Batteries   We are introducing our prepaid battery recycling initiative this month to help schools, businesses and households engaged in responsible battery recycling. To encourage community recycling initiatives, all orders placed during National Recycling Week November 10-16, will receive 10% off the standard pricing for our battery solution.   To start recycling your batteries, visit ourshop   ECOACTIV aims to help organisations get involved in their workplace and responsibly manage their electronic and battery waste. Engaging staff and suppliers is the key to success.   For more information Toll Free Helpdesk: 1800 489 278 Email: info @ ecoactiv.com Web: www.ecoactiv.com.au   *Battery recycling program is only offered in NSW, VIC, QLD Business Awards Trifecta for Local Logistics Company 2014-11-03T00:46:20Z business-awards-trifecta-for-local-logistics-company A dynamic Box Hill based company has scooped the 2014 Whitehorse Excellence in Business Awards, the annual awards program organised by the Whitehorse Business Group.   Acknowledging a customer-centric approach, innovation, commercial performance and environmental benefits, Infoactiv received the Medium Business Award, the Environmental and Sustainability Award and the Overall Award as part of the Whitehorse Excellence in Business Awards.   Established in 1999, Infoactiv is a leading independent provider of supply chain and sustainability solutions across the Asia Pacific region. Infoactiv delivers value-added solutions to OEMs, brands, retailers, corporations, institutions and government authorities. Infoactiv customers include MobileMuster, City of Sydney, CISCO and Nikon. The company's ECOACTIV Product Recovery Program is totally focused on product stewardship and innovation in waste management.   The company’s approach is driven by customer need and providing support to better manage internal and external management challenges.   Helen Jarman, Founder and Managing Director said that ‘Infoactiv operates as a business resource for customers rather than a conventional out-sourced supplier.’   ‘The focus is on adding value, efficiency, effectiveness and innovation while ensuring environmentally improved outcomes’ said Ms Jarman.   Infoactiv’s ability to work with companies and further enhance their Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility (CSR) performance flows from the ability to identify opportunities that can contribute to how an organisation translates responsibility and engagement into actionable measures and commercial advantage.   Whether it’s about product recovery and recycling e-waste in partnership with local councils, or more effectively managing assets for corporates and global brands, Infoactiv is sharply focused on the triple bottom line – people, planet, profit.   Being recognised by the Whitehorse Excellence in Business Awards is an honour and reinforces Infoactiv’s commitment to adding value, innovation and environmentally improved outcomes. Ten steps to fix E-waste recycling in Australia 2014-10-08T04:42:27Z ten-steps-to-fix-e-waste-recycling-in-australia There are still many local councils across Australia that have missed out on benefiting from the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS), and this requires urgent rectification. There is a role for all of us to help shape and improve the scheme.  Collaboration is key and the following 10 point plan should be acted on in a timely manner: 1. Increase the level of monitoring and enforcement The level of policing to date by the Commonwealth Government Regulator has not overly transparent, which in turn has undermined public confidence, especially among local councils and social enterprise recyclers. In addition, State agencies and EPAs must also increase monitoring and enforcement of collectors and recyclers to ensure that NTCRS related activities and operations are in compliance with State regulations, licensing and permitting. 2. Introduce collection targets for each State and Territory The current single figure national target is an economic disincentive for Co-regulatory Arrangements to ensure effective and adequate collections in some States, especially Western Australia where many communities are not serviced, despite the scheme’s Reasonable Access requirements. Collection targets allocated to each State and Territory will positively compel Co-regulatory Arrangements to pro-actively secure higher volumes on a more equitable basis nationwide. 3. Revise collection targets over the next three years A stiffening of the collection targets over the short-term has the potential to address the current situation of ‘surplus-to-compliance’ volumes and stockpiles. A revised target of 50% to 55% may also reduce the risk of councils having services withdrawn. 4. Mandate appropriate standards in the Regulations The relatively new AS/NZS 5377:2013 related to collection, storage, transport and treatment of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment should be cited in the Regulations and be a mandatory requirement for all Co-regulatory Arrangements. Independent auditing against this standard is also essential. This will harmonise performance objectives and outcomes as well as raise the performance bar for suppliers, providers and collection partners operating under the NTCRS. 5. Improve the quality of community awareness and education activities The quality of community awareness and education activities associated with the NTCRS has been superficial at best. More education and less PR needed. Impactful consumer campaigns combined with genuine schools education programs are needed to achieve the desired behaviour change and ultimately meet the increasing collection targets. 6. Increase collaboration between Co-regulatory Arrangements The Commonwealth Government Regulator should encourage and/or compel Co-regulatory Arrangements to work more cooperatively on servicing regional and remote areas of Australia. Greater collaboration to improve community awareness and common messaging is also urgently required. Greater collaboration focused on involving social enterprise recyclers is also overdue. 7. Increase the quality of public reporting by the Co-regulatory Arrangements While some reporting and documents from some Co-regulatory Arrangements features important detail and statistics, the overall quality of annual reports to date has been breathtakingly poor and unacceptable under a regulated scheme. 8. Increase the quality of public reporting by the Commonwealth Government Regulator The depth and detail associated with reporting from the Government needs to improve and expand to provide greater visibility of performance and challenges, as well as flag future activities relevant to the NTCRS. 9. More accurate calculation of Scheme and Co-regulatory targets A more collaborative approach is required between the Regulator, Co-regulatory Arrangements and Liable Parties in order to arrive at acceptable conversion factors that are recognised by both industry and Government. These calculations must be revised regularly and reflect new technologies and associated form factors. 10. Introduce product reuse objectives Consistent with the waste management hierarchy, it is timely to demonstrate some measurable commitment to waste avoidance and reuse principles within the context of the NTCRS. The Commonwealth Government Regulator should commence focused discussions with Co-regulatory Arrangements on where and how to best integrate reuse and product life extension objectives as part of future schemes operations and activities, even if this commences with more effective consumer education programs. Easy and necessary Adjusting and optimising the NTCRS need not be onerous or process-bound. Rapid adoption of the above points will not only serve to re-set and improve the scheme, it will allow Minister Hunt the opportunity to demonstrate some decisive action and the required amendments to the Product Stewardship (Televisions and Computers) Regulations in response to community and industry concerns. Anything less would fail to meet community expectations. It would also overlook the millions of dollars invested to date by environmentally committed IT and consumer electronics companies. By correcting the scheme in a timely manner, the Australian Government is perfectly placed to work with Co-regulatory Arrangements, Councils, providers and the public to ensure the delivery of a national e-waste program that is environmentally necessary, commercially responsible and socially desirable. ENDS Battery Recycling on Slow Charge 2014-07-14T02:50:12Z battery-recycling-on-slow-charge New data on battery recycling supports the need for a national product stewardship scheme for batteries. A recent report for the Government-sponsored Battery Implementation Working Group (BIWG) has found that the recycling rate for handheld batteries was only 2.7% in 2012-13. Based on a recent survey of manufacturers, retailers and recyclers, the report estimated that 14,703 tonnes of handheld batteries reached the end of their life during 2012-13, yet only 403 tonnes were recycled. Around 385 million handheld batteries were disposed to landfill in 2012-13. This represents a loss of non-renewable resources including steel, lithium, zinc, manganese, cobalt, silver, plastics and rare earth elements. Battery recycling allows the non-renewable resources in batteries to be recovered. It removes toxic and hazardous substances from landfill, particularly lead, cadmium and mercury that may contaminate groundwater and other recyclables if not managed correctly. Lithium metal batteries can cause explosions or fires in landfill. A recent consumer survey conducted by market research company IPSOS in January 2014 found strong support for battery recycling. Three-quarters of respondents (77%) believe that it is important to recycle used batteries rather than dispose of them to landfill. Voluntary battery recycling programs are continuing to grow with the support of leading brands, retailers, government authorities and recyclers. Companies such as Canon, Toshiba, Samsung, Century Yuasa Batteries, Exide Batteries, Supercharge Batteries and R&J Batteries are taking a leadership role through their membership of the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI). According to ABRI CEO Helen Lewis, “While some retailers and battery manufacturers are collecting batteries, much more needs to be done to meet community expectations and protect the environment.” “Collection and recycling services need to provide consumers with nationwide access to a free and convenient drop-off facility for their used batteries. This will require financial support from manufacturers, brands and importers to help cover collection and recycling costs”  Dr Lewis said. Australian governments established the Battery Implementation Working Group in August 2013 to help in the development of a voluntary stewardship scheme for handheld batteries.  “ABRI fully supports a voluntary collection scheme for handheld batteries, but acknowledges that the success of a voluntary scheme is unlikely without the full cooperation of all major manufacturers and importers” said Dr Lewis. “Without the cooperation of these manufacturers in a voluntary scheme, regulation is likely to be required to create an effective solution for battery recycling in Australia. In the USA, battery manufacturers and importers are already working collaboratively with governments to introduce battery recycling regulations. Perhaps this is something that needs to be seriously considered for Australia”. In Australia, handheld batteries (up to 5kg) have again been listed by the Australian Government as a Priority Product for consideration under the Product Stewardship Act.  ENDS The Product Stewardship 2.0 Imperative 2014-05-12T11:26:56Z the-product-stewardship-2-0-imperative A growing number of Product Stewardship programs in Australia and abroad are in serious danger of becoming simplistic end-of-pipe solutions that are overly focused on collecting 'rubbish' and primitive materials recovery. The need to recalibrate the definition and application of Product Stewardship is urgent, as is the need to consider waste avoidance and resource recovery priorities beyond end-of-life recycling i.e. the Product Stewardship 2.0 imperative as we call it at Infoactiv. While Product Stewardship and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) are often used interchangeably, the theory tells us that there are differences, some widely accepted, others concocted on the basis of regional or ideological grounds. When Professor Thomas Lindhqvist from Sweden's Lund University first coined the term EPR in 1990, his intent showed of clarity of purpose: "Extended Producer Responsibility is an environmental protection strategy to reach an environmental objective of a decreased total environmental impact from a product, by making the manufacturer of the product responsible for the entire life-cycle of the product and especially for the take-back, recycling and final disposal of the product. The Extended Producer Responsibility is implemented through administrative, economic and informative instruments. The composition of these instruments determines the precise form of the Extended Producer Responsibility." Lindhqvist's definition remains intact as does its integrity of purpose, however its interpretation and implementation have suffered dramatically in many instances, as EPR schemes devolve into unsophisticated waste management initiatives part funded by producers and part funded by the public purse. What ever happened to the cost-shifting objective associated with EPR and ensuring that producers and consumers pay for externalities rather than local authorities and their communities? Furthermore, what measurable evidence can we test with regard to how EPR effectively ensures information feedback to the product development process to help create more benign, low impact products and product systems? It is fair to say that useful examples can be found of where EPR and Product Stewardship programs have indeed informed new product development, especially in the commercial furniture, auto and packaging industries, however local authorities and public funds are still drawn on to partly cover the cost of 'industry-funded' schemes. Many critics will convincingly argue that cost-shifting from local authorities and governments, to producers, retailers and consumers, has yet to fully mature, especially in relation to more complex manufactured goods such as electrical and electronic equipment. Lindhqvist's theory remains seductive, relevant and timely, however much can be done to achieve higher levels of EPR performance in reality. Whether we call it EPR or product Stewardship, there are glaring gaps in its implementation. Whether it's about equitable cost-sharing, greater retailer involvement, more direct feedback loops for improved design, or coherent internalisation of all externalities, we can all do much to improve the status of EPR and Product Stewardship schemes, to achieve significant socio-environmental benefit. In short, the time has come to remind ourselves of the theory, and operationalise worthwhile policy principles into 'real-world' programs that are driven by life cycle thinking as opposed to simplistic and sometimes expensive 'waste' collection programs. Beyond Simplistic Waste Management Responses Let's remember the importance of good design, eco-innovation and the need to push the boundaries of pollution prevention. The principles exist, the tools are known and the metrics can be devised. What all players must do, is deliver on the intent and purpose of EPR and Product Stewardship, and this means targeting relevant stages of the product life cycle to intervene with necessary environmental improvement measures. From design and cleaner production, through to greener supply chains and improved public education; it is vital that producers  work collaboratively with retailers, government, researchers to meet consumer expectations and maximise environmental quality. The use-by date for spartan waste management programs has passed; the time for Product Stewardship 2.0 has clearly arrived. Infoactiv welcomes the need to debate and improve the current status and performance of Product Stewardship and EPR in Australia and the region. Let's talk about the journey ahead and how we can ensure that EPR programs deliver noteworthy environmental outcomes. This means creating solutions that are ecologically necessary, commercially responsible and socially desirable.   Northcote High School Recycles IT Waste 2014-03-17T04:34:38Z northcote-high-school-recycles-it-waste Northcote High School (Victoria) is 'walking the talk' and doing something practical about reducing the amount of e-waste going to landfill.The School in partnership with ECOACTIV Product Recovery Programs is offering free drop-off and recycling of unwanted IT equipment for students, teachers, parents and the wider school community including local businesses.ECOACTIV Product Recovery programs help to ensure that we collect and recycle unwanted IT equipment. This also helps to ensure the safe handling of potentially hazardous substances.Clean out your shelves, cupboards, garages and shedTell your friends and family and drop off your unwanted IT ‘stuff’ to Northcote HighWhen               Monday 17th – Friday 21st March 2014 Including PARENT STUDENT TEACHER Sessions: Tuesday 18th and Thursday 20th March 1.30 – 7.30pm Location Northcote High School: either Music Car park or Conference Room - St Georges Rd, Northcote Victoria 3070 What can be recycled for free? LCD & CRT Monitors Laptops/PC/Desktop/Tower Servers Copiers/Fax Machines/Printers Cabinet Servers/Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Desk & Mobile Phones* Miscellaneous IT waste About ECOACTIV ECOACTIV Product Recovery programs are managed by Infoactiv, a leading supply chain and environmental services organisation operating across the Asia Pacific region. Infoactiv’s EMS has been independently certified to ISO14001. More information about ECOACTIV available here. Toll free enquiries:  1800 489 278 Battery Recycling Needs a Boost 2014-03-12T02:35:30Z battery-recycling-needs-a-boost The enthusiasm for battery recycling in Australia continues to grow, however there is a need to minimise burdensome process-bound activities.Of all waste streams, a stewardship approach for handheld batteries (under 5kg) should be achievable within a relatively short time-frame, even if it means small steps and modest incremental outcomes. Handheld batteries are not televisions or IT equipment; nor do they require unnecessarily complex regulatory instruments or high cost developmental interventions. There are ample programs, schemes and services underway in many countries around the world to learn from, and reconfigure for the Australian market.Consumer research by Planet Ark suggests that the wider community is ready and willing to embrace responsible battery recycling behaviours. Our own commercial experience also supports the view that some organisations (private and public) are prepared to recycle batteries through a user-pays service, especially where there are uniform national solutions as opposed to piecemeal trials with limited environmental benefits.Ongoing work by the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI) demonstrates that numerous stakeholders are eager to see national solutions that are cost effective and environmentally sound. Considerable research and several studies have been prepared by ABRI, and these together with other reports by Sustainability Victoria and the Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, are feeding into a national process through the Battery Implementation Working Group. This group is chaired by Russ Martin, CEO of the Global Product Stewardship Council. This has the potential to inform the creation of a national program, however much more needs to be done to quickly and positively engage key battery brands and major retailers to be the primary architects of any program. Not always a straightforward activity.An important recent outcome has been the release of a discussion paper on 'Options and approaches for the proposed Handheld Battery Product Stewardship Scheme'. This key document is a proposal developed by the Battery Implementation Working Group, a committee made up of industry associations, the Federal Department of the Environment and State agencies (Victoria and Queensland). The discussion paper can be downloaded here and is inviting feedback by 31 March 2014.In summary, the proposal is for voluntary, industry-led national product stewardship scheme applying to all handheld batteries less than 5 kg, with the exception of embedded batteries (i.e. batteries that can’t be removed without damaging the product). As a voluntary, industry-led national approach, the proposed Scheme is open to a broad range of stakeholders and has the benefits of simplicity of design, reduced barriers to participation and ease of understanding. The proposed Scheme may provide more immediate action with lower costs compared to a co-regulatory approach, however this has yet to be tested. It is envisaged that importers of handheld batteries would have primary financial responsibility for funding the Scheme, however the question s funding is often the most contentious element and subject to fierce debate. Chief Sustainability Officer with Infoactiv Group said that "ultimately, the focus must be on a national solution that is owned and managed by key stakeholders. To spend time, effort and public funds on process-bound activities which meander options at a glacial pace will be an embarrassment for policy makers, associations, brands and retailers alike." "It would also highlight that we have not fully understood and addressed the learnings from existing schemes and programs, be it exemplary voluntary initiatives such as MobileMuster (mobile phone take-back), or the nascent and 'rough-running' co-regulated National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme, said Gertsakis. The time has come for battery recycling to get a rapid boost in Australia, and for key producers and retailers to drive the process mindful of their commercial, social and environmental priorities.   It's Time to Let Go of Electronic Waste 2014-03-06T06:52:32Z it-s-time-to-let-go-of-electronic-waste Register today and recycle your IT equipment for free ECOACTIV Product Recovery programs help to ensure that we collect and recycle unwanted IT equipment so that materials can be reused in the manufacture of new products. Some older IT equipment can also contain hazardous substances and we need to make sure that these are safely managed in an environmentally sound manner. What can be collected and recycled for free? The following types of IT equipment are covered by the service: LCD/FLAT/CRT Monitors Laptops/PC/Desktop/Tower Servers/ Copiers/Fax machines/Printers Cabinet Servers/ Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Phone (Desk & Mobiles including accessories) Miscellaneous IT waste Locations covered: metropolitan Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane Who can register for this free service? The ECOACTIV free IT equipment collection and recycling service is open to small, medium and large companies, retailers, government agencies, public institutions, healthcare related organisations, NGOs and not-for-profits. Time is limited so register today All IT equipment, mobile phones and accessories will be recycled by a specialist e-waste recycler with more than 90% of the materials recovered. The recycler’s Environmental Management System is independently certified to ISO14001 and R2, and audited to AS/NZS 5377:2013. Nothing is resold or reused. Next steps For more detail about the service register here:  www.ecoactiv.com.au/ewaste About ECOACTIV ECOACTIV Product Recovery Programs are managed by Infoactiv, a leading supply chain solutions organisation operating across the Asia Pacific region. We also manage the reverse logistics and recycling operations for MobileMuster – the official recycling and product stewardship program of the mobile phone industry. MobileMuster is a year-round free service to consumers and business that accepts and recycles all brands of mobile phones at no cost. More information Toll Free Helpdesk:  1800 489 278 Email:  info@ecoactiv.com.auhttp://www.ecoactiv.com.au/ewaste/ Free E-waste Recycling Service for Business and NGOs 2013-12-16T08:04:12Z free-e-waste-recycling-service-for-business ECOACTIV Product Recovery programs help to ensure that we collect and recycle unwanted IT equipment so that materials can be reused in the manufacture of new products. Some older IT equipment can also contain hazardous substances and we need to make sure that these are safely managed in an environmentally sound manner. What can be collected and recycled for free? The following types of IT equipment are covered by the service: LCD/FLAT/CRT Monitors Laptops/PC/Desktop/Tower Servers/ Copiers/Fax machines/Printers Cabinet Servers/ Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Phone (Desk & Mobiles including accessories) Miscellaneous IT waste Locations covered – Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane Metropolitan Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane are covered by this service. If you fall outside these areas, please contact us to confirm whether we can help. Call the ECOACTIV helpdesk: 1800 489 278 Who can register for this free service? The ECOACTIV free IT equipment collection and recycling service is open to small, medium and large companies, retailers, government agencies, public institutions, healthcare related organisations, NGOs and not-for-profits. Time is limited so register today This offer is for a limited time and the deadline for Stage 1 collections ends soon. What happens to your IT equipment and reporting All IT equipment, mobile phones and accessories will be recycled by a specialist e-waste recycler with more than 90% of the materials recovered. The recycler’s Environmental Management System is independently certified to ISO14001 and R2, and audited to AS/NZS 5377:2013. Nothing is resold or reused. Next steps For more detail about the service and to register, look here. About ECOACTIV ECOACTIV Product Recovery Programs are managed by Infoactiv, a leading supply chain solutions organisation operating across the Asia Pacific region. We also manage the reverse logistics and recycling operations for MobileMuster – the official recycling and product stewardship program of the mobile phone industry. MobileMuster is a year-round free service to consumers and business that accepts and recycles all brands of mobile phones at no cost. More information Toll Free Helpdesk:  1800 489 278 Email:  info@ecoactiv.com.auhttp://www.ecoactiv.com.au/ewaste/ Keeping the Spotlight on E-Waste in Australia 2013-06-17T00:02:45Z keeping-the-spotlight-on-e-waste-in-australia There is movement across the Asia Pacific region for increased e-waste recycling and diversion of unwanted electrical and electronic product from landfill, such as televisions, computers, printers, appliances and batteries.   In Australia, the scale of the problem is significant with an estimated 106,000 tonnes of televisions and computers (16.8 million units) reaching end of life in recent years, and the numbers are growing.   The National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme is leading the way with various industry organisations rolling out collection and recycling services across urban and regional areas.   Included in this pursuit of excellence, are individuals, teams and companies behind noteworthy environmental solutions, including the contribution of John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer at Infoactiv Group.   As a result of his work on e-waste recycling policy and implementation, John has been named as a ‘Resources and Waste Leader’ in the 2013 WME Leaders List. This wonderful acknowledgement resulted from over 100 nominations and more than 1500 public votes.   The WME Leaders List is an annual event focused on recognising individuals and their leadership qualities. It is judged by industry experts and the WME readership, and highlights outstanding individual achievements, which advance sustainability.   John was involved from the outset in 2000 with early calls to establish a national approach to industry-funded e-waste recycling. Underpinned by relentless advocacy, his collaborative approach with government, industry and NGOs played a critical role in realising the Commonwealth Product Stewardship Act 2011.   As part of a specialist team at Infoactiv, John’s work on e-waste recycling is now expanding into new sectors, and is aimed at helping organisations minimise business risk and environmental harm from a hybrid of products and related waste such as laptops, appliances, batteries, commercial furniture and polystyrene.   Infoactiv’s Managing Director, Helen Jarman noted that:   “John’s knowledge, history and action on product sustainability is comprehensive, and spans over a decade of consulting to brands, OEMs, industry associations and governments in Australia and New Zealand. John’s WME accolade further accentuates the quality of commitment and expertise fostered at Infoactiv in pursuit of exceeding customer expectations.”    John’s commitment to ensuring long term solutions to e-waste recycling began in 1996 with Australia’s first comprehensive report on e-waste titled ‘Short Circuiting Waste from Electrical and Electronic Products’, published by RMIT University. He also advised the consumer electronics industry on the development of TV recycling in Australia.   John’s work on environmental stewardship has been further highlighted through his appointment to the Australian Government’s Product Stewardship Advisory Group, where his experience is directly relevant to recommending new products and wastes that could be addressed under the Product Stewardship Act.   In response to the Leaders List accolade, John said that:   “Being a WME Resources and Waste Leader is a wonderful honour and I feel truly humbled. More importantly it keeps product stewardship and e-waste recycling on the agenda. It also demonstrates that our customers and their investment in product recovery results in broader social, economic and environmental benefit.”   - ENDS -     E-waste related photographic images available on request.     ABOUT INFOACTIV Infoactiv is the leading independent specialist provider of supply chain and sustainability solutions in Asia Pacific, delivering value-added product stewardship and asset management solutions to OEMs, brands, retailers, corporations, institutions and government agencies. Established in Australia in 1999 by Helen Jarman, Entrepreneur and Telstra Businesswoman’s Award recipient, Infoactiv partners with customers as a trusted and independent operator focused on reverse logistics, sustainability and innovation. For more information see:  www.ecoactiv.com.au   ABOUT WME The WME Leaders List is an annual event aimed at identifying and acknowledging the contribution of individuals towards advancing sustainability through policy, regulation, practices, ideas and innovation. The Leaders List process is run by WME magazine, one of Australian’s leading ‘Environment Business’ publications. For more information see:  www.wme.com.au   GENERAL ENQUIRIES John Gertsakis – Chief Sustainability Officer Infoactiv Group Level 3, 26-28 Prospect Street Box Hill Victoria 3128 Australia Mobile:  0409 422 089   Email:  john.gertsakis@infoactiv.com.au   Free E-waste Recycling Event Comes to Caulfield 2012-11-27T02:13:48Z free-e-waste-recycling-event-comes-to-caulfield The Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) recently launched the TechCollect program; a free e-waste recycling service for the general public and small business targeting unwanted computers, peripherals and televisions. In partnership with Glen Eira City Council, the TechCollect program will be a running an e-waste collection day at Caulfield on Sunday 2nd December from 8:00am until 4:00pm. The event will be held at the Glen Eira Town Hall, corner Glen Eira and Hawthorn Roads, Caulfield. Unwanted computer equipment and televisions can be dropped off for recycling, free of charge. The collected e-waste will then be recycled for use in manufacturing new products, instead of going into landfill. Council will also be receiving other types of e-waste such as small electrical household goods, game consoles, video recorders, DVD players, microwaves and small power tools. TechCollect is fully funded by ANZRP’s members, more than 60 manufacturers and importers of televisions and computer products, that have chosen ANZRP to deliver sustainable environmental outcomes on their behalf; companies who are putting environmental outcomes first. “ANZRP, on behalf of our members, is delighted to introduce this free nationwide recycling service which will assist in significantly reducing the volume of e-waste that ends up in landfill. We encourage the general public and small business to dispose of their unwanted televisions and computer products in an environmentally sustainable way, which TechCollect is able to guarantee,” said Carmel Dollisson, Chief Executive Officer, ANZRP. “Australia’s e-waste issue can only be tackled by companies and communities working together. We take product stewardship seriously and look forward to working with our members, local councils and recyclers to provide communities with a free sustainable recycling service.” said Ms Dollisson. For further information on e-waste recycling visit www.techcollect.com.au For more detailed information about the event being held on 2nd December at the Glen Eira Town Hall, corner Glen Eira Road and Hawthorn Road, Caulfield, visit:  http://www.gleneira.vic.gov.au/Council/Garbage_and_recycling/Free_e-waste_collection_service   Items accepted through TechCollect: Computer equipment including any brand of desktop, laptop, monitors, mice, keyboards, cables, drives and computer-related peripherals. Printers and scanners Televisions Glen Eira City Council will also be accepting additional types of e-waste. For more information on items accepted and not accepted, check Council’s web site: http://www.gleneira.vic.gov.au/Council/Garbage_and_recycling/Free_e-waste_collection_service The public can also call the TechCollect enquiries number on 1300 229 837 ENDS About TechCollectTechCollect is the public face of the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP), one of three government approved co-regulatory arrangements for the implementation of the Federal government’s Product Stewardship Act 2011 and the new National Computer & Television Recycling Scheme (NCTRS). For more information visit www.techcollect.com.au About Australia and New Zealand Recycling PlatformAustralia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) is a not for profit, industry run member body established to collect and recycle electronic waste on behalf of its members. For more information visit www.anzrp.com.au About the National Television and Computer Recycling SchemeThe National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme is funded and implemented by the television and computer industry and regulated by the Australian Government under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 and the Product Stewardship (Televisions and Computers) Regulations 2011.     Unwanted Televisions and Obsolete Computers Dodge Landfill 2012-11-14T07:54:35Z unwanted-televisions-and-obsolete-computers-dodge-landfill The Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) recently launched the TechCollect program; a free e-waste recycling service for the general public and small business to drop-off unwanted televisions and computer products. In partnership with a growing number of local councils, the TechCollect program will be running e-waste collection events on a regular basis across metropolitan and regional locations. This weekend's events include: - Saturday 17 November:  Epping Depot from 9:00am to 5:00pm,  68-96 Houston Street, Epping, City of Whittlesea, Victoria. - Sunday 18 November:  Meadowbank Netball Courts carpark (end of Adelaide Street), from 9:00am to 3:00pm, Meadowbank, City of Ryde, NSW. Unwanted computers, computer accessories and televisions can be dropped off for recycling, free of charge. The collected e-waste will then be recycled for use in manufacturing new products, instead of going into landfill. TechCollect is fully funded by ANZRP’s members, more than 60 manufacturers and importers of televisions and computer products, that have chosen ANZRP to deliver sustainable environmental outcomes on their behalf; companies who are putting environmental outcomes first. Items accepted: - Computer equipment including any brand of desktop, laptop, monitors, mice, keyboards, cables, drives and computer-related peripherals. - Printers and scanners - Televisions This collection is free for the general public and small business only. For further information on e-waste recycling visit www.techcollect.com.au About TechCollectTechCollect is the public face of the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP), one of three government approved co-regulatory arrangements for the implementation of the Federal government’s Product Stewardship Act 2011 and the new National Computer & Television Recycling Scheme (NCTRS). For more information visit www.techcollect.com.au About Australia and New Zealand Recycling PlatformAustralia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) is a not for profit, industry run member body established to collect and recycle electronic waste on behalf of its members. For more information visit www.anzrp.com.au   Product Stewardship Specialist Joins Infoactiv Group 2012-10-29T12:22:52Z product-stewardship-specialist-joins-infoactiv-group Infoactiv Group is pleased to announce the appointment of John Gertsakis as the company’s Chief Sustainability Officer. This marks a significant and exciting phase for Infoactiv as we further invest in ensuring sustainability is at the forefront of the solutions we design and provide to our customers. "John will inject considerable experience, knowledge and networks into our leadership team with a view to maximising sustainability performance and communications.  This includes undertaking research and development that can inform and drive new products and services at Infoactiv" said Helen Jarman, Managing Director of Infoactiv Group. John’s focus on business strategies that extend our Product Stewardship programs across product classes and regions will further reinforce the company’s existing capabilities and customer base. John’s knowledge covering product sustainability, sustainable design, producer responsibility and stakeholder management is extensive. He has a deep familiarity with Infoactiv’s range of services, project partners and customers through his work as a consultant to the company over several years, especially in relation to our e-waste management services. "John’s enthusiasm for seeing ‘real world’ implementation of Product Stewardship is a great fit for Infoactiv and our dynamic team of supply chain, logistics and waste management specialists" said Ms Jarman. He has worked as a senior environmental practitioner in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom for over 15 years, and most recently as Senior Associate with WSP Environment & Energy, a major global professional services firm. John has consulted to numerous companies, brands, OEMs and industry associations across the supply chain, including consumer electronics, ICT, commercial furniture, floor coverings and textiles. John also worked very closely with the Consumer Electronics Suppliers Association to develop the concept for how e-waste could be effectively collected and recycled in Australia. This was followed by his pivotal role as Executive Director of Product Stewardship Australia from 2006 - 2011. His work with PSA and CESA was focused on program design, government relations and direct input to the Product Stewardship Act (2011) as it relates to the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme. John has written and presented widely in Australia and New Zealand on product sustainability, environmental stewardship, producer responsibility and the role of and intelligent regulation. This includes ‘practice notes’ and guidelines for the Design Institute of Australia and Sustainability Victoria and in his current role as Sustainability Editor for Indesign Magazine. He has also served as a sustainability and design judge for several awards programs including the Premier’s Design Awards (Victoria), the AIIA iAwards, and the Australasian Student Design Awards. John is the Sustainability Chairman for the 2013 Australian Interior Design Awards, a role he has served since 2010. John also authored Australia’s first report on e-waste product stewardship in 1995 titled: Short Circuiting Waste from Electronic Products. "Please join me in welcoming John to the Infoactiv team, and don’t hesitate to contact him for a conversation about the business of Product Stewardship and how Infoactiv can make it happen" noted Ms Jarman.John Gertsakis can be contacted on mobile: 0409 422 089 or by email: john.gertsakis @ infoactiv.com.au Free Recycling Event for Unwanted TVs and Computers 2012-10-29T01:40:46Z free-recycling-event-for-unwanted-tvs-and-computers-comes-to-blacktown-city-council The Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) recently launched the TechCollect program; a free e-waste recycling service for the general public and small business to drop-off unwanted televisions and computer products. In partnership with the Blacktown City Council, the TechCollect program will be a running a free e-waste collection event at Rooty Hill on Saturday 3 and Sunday 4 November from 9:00 am until 3:00pm. The event will be held at the Blacktown International Sports Park car park, Eastern Road, Rooty Hill.Unwanted computers, computer accessories and televisions can be dropped off for recycling, free of charge. The collected e-waste will then be recycled for use in manufacturing new products, instead of going into landfill. TechCollect is fully funded by ANZRP’s members, more than 60 manufacturers and importers of televisions and computer products, that have chosen ANZRP to deliver sustainable environmental outcomes on their behalf; companies who are putting environmental outcomes first. “ANZRP, on behalf of our members, is delighted to introduce this free nationwide recycling service which will assist in significantly reducing the volume of e-waste that ends up in landfill. We encourage the general public and small businesses to dispose of their end of life (EOL) televisions and computer products in an environmentally sustainable way, which TechCollect is able to guarantee,” said Carmel Dollisson, Chief Executive Officer, ANZRP. “Australia’s e-waste issue can only be tackled by companies and communities working together, we take product stewardship seriously and look forward to working with our members, local councils and recyclers to provide communities with a free sustainable recycling service.” said Ms Dollisson.Some important points- This collection is for the general public and small business only- For expediency and your safety, please remain in your vehicle at the drop-off site- It is your responsibility to delete any data form your devices- For further information on e-waste recycling visit  www.techcollect.com.au- For more detailed information about the TechCollect event being held on 3 and 4 November 2012 at Rooty Hill visit:http://www.blacktown.nsw.gov.au/news-and-events/news-releases/e-cycle-your-unwanted-electronics.cfmItems accepted: - Computer equipment including any brand of desktop, laptop, monitors, mice, keyboards, cables, drives and computer-related peripherals.- Printers and scanners- TelevisionsItems NOT accepted:- Game consoles- Video recorders and DVD player- Whitegoods and household appliances (e.g. vacuum cleaners, microwaves)- Power tools- Non-computer batteries- Radios and stereo equipment The public can also call the TechCollect enquiries number on 1300 229 837 About TechCollectTechCollect is the public face of the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP), one of three government approved co-regulatory arrangements for the implementation of the Federal government’s Product Stewardship Act 2011 and the new National Computer & Television Recycling Scheme (NCTRS). For more information visit www.techcollect.com.au About Australia and New Zealand Recycling PlatformAustralia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) is a not for profit, industry run member body established to collect and recycle electronic waste on behalf of its members. For more information visit www.anzrp.com.au About the National Television and Computer Recycling SchemeThe National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme is funded and implemented by the television and computer industry and regulated by the Australian Government under the Product Stewardship Act 2011 and the Product Stewardship (Televisions and Computers) Regulations 2011.