The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2011-11-28T10:46:22Z 90% of Hong Kong employers plan to increase pay in 2012, but still struggle to retain talent 2011-11-28T10:46:22Z 90-of-hong-kong-employers-plan-to-increase-pay-in-2012-but-still-struggle-to-retain-talent (Hong Kong) ORC International’s latest HR Reflections survey has revealed that HR professionals in the Hong Kong region are significantly more positive than in other global regions. There are however, issues on retention given the more fluid market. Pay and bonuses stand out as areas where the region far exceeds the global norms. In Hong Kong 90% compared to 55% globally are considering pay rises at or above the levels of previous years. And, 41% compared to a global 26% award bonuses to all employees regardless of individual performance or grade. Other key findings of the survey are: - 74% of Hong Kong employers compared to a global 55% said that their organisation's performance was better than it was 12 months ago- 41% of Hong Kong Employers thought the recession had ended and the economic outlook is brighter. The global norm was 12%- 78% compared to a global 60% said that their organisation's main focus for the next 12 months was growth above stability While the buzz coming out of this region does stand out as exceptionally positive, feelings around staff turnover and retention are clearly less positive. 44% compared to a global 23% think that their ability to retain talent is worse than it was 12 months ago. Furthermore, 30% compared to a global 12% think that turnover is higher than in previous years and are concerned that they aren’t retaining staff. Rory MacNeill, Global Managing Director of ORC International’s Employee Research division comments: “There are a number of cultural differences between Hong Kong and the other global regions. Pay and bonuses are often seen as an expectation, so these results are not hugely surprising. However, the indication that things are getting worse is a concern for the regions employers. The overall sentiment coming out of this region is very positive compared to global norms. As this is the first time Hong Kong has been included in the HR Reflections survey, it will be interesting to monitor the development of this pay vs. retention trend moving into 2012.” About HR Reflections HR Reflections was conducted in July 2011. The survey was sent out to HR professionals, internal communications consultants and employee engagement specialists in the USA, Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. The purpose of the survey was to understand their views on a range of organisational and HR issues, the current economic climate and their predictions in the next 12 months. 1,148 responses were received from a variety of different industries and sectors About ORC International ORC International is a leading global research firm with offices across the US, Europe and Asia Pacific. The company offers a platform of integrated intelligence that combines forward-thinking methodologies, cutting-edge technology, skilled researchers and in-depth industry experience to provide clients with valuable insight to help solve their most pressing business challenges. Specifically, the company has more than 25 years of employee research experience and manages some of the largest employee-related research/surveys worldwide. To learn more about ORCInternational, visit www.orcinternational.co.uk Better safe than sorry - Australian employers stay focused on stability over growth 2011-11-28T10:07:50Z better-safe-than-sorry-australian-employers-stay-focused-on-stability-over-growth (Melbourne, VIC) ORC International’s recent HR Reflections survey has revealed that Australian employers are more cautious than other nations going into 2012; preferring to focus on stability rather than growth.45% of the Australia-based HR professionals surveyed are focused on growth for the coming year. Globally employers are more positive with 60% focused on growth. The split between growth and stability is far more evenly divided than in other regions, with 38% of respondents focusing on stability, compared to 24% overall. This shows that while employers in Australia are less optimistic, they are not overly negative. Other key findings from the survey were:- Only 44% of Australian employers compared to a global 55% said that their organisation's performance was better than it was 12 months ago- 32% of Australian employers are considering redundancies in next 12 months (compared to 21% globally) However, there are still some areas that stand out as positive signs for Australian employees. 69% compared to a global 55% are considering pay rises at or above the levels of previous years. Rory MacNeill, Global Managing Director of ORC International’s Employee Research division comments: “In this latest HR Reflections survey, Australia stands out as one of the more cautious regions. Its employment market has weathered the financial storm well and maintains a reputation as a good place to work with good pay and benefits. While the views coming out of these organisations are more reserved, they do not stand out as downbeat.” About HR Reflections HR Reflections was conducted in July 2011. The survey was sent out to HR professionals, internal communications consultants and employee engagement specialists in the USA, Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. The purpose of the survey was to understand their views on a range of organisational and HR issues, the current economic climate and their predictions in the next 12 months. 1,148 responses were received from a variety of different industries and sectors About ORC International ORC International is a leading global research firm with offices across the US, Europe and Asia Pacific. The company offers a platform of integrated intelligence that combines forward-thinking methodologies, cutting-edge technology, skilled researchers and in-depth industry experience to provide clients with valuable insight to help solve their most pressing business challenges. Specifically, the company has more than 25 years of employee research experience and manages some of the largest employee-related research/surveys worldwide. To learn more about ORCInternational, visit www.orcinternational.com.au The boom continues - China’s employee engagement levels up 10% in 2011 2011-10-24T09:06:55Z the-boom-continues-china-s-employee-engagement-levels-up-10-in-2011 (HONG KONG, CHINA) According to the latest global perspectives survey from ORC International, improvements in China’s engagement levels this year have been exponential. In 2011, China rose seven places in the global engagement rankings, from ninth position in 2010 to second position overall, with their EmployeeEngagement Index (EEI) score rising from 57% to 67%. The global EEI score remained identical to 2010, at 57%. In China, the survey questions linked to emotional aspects received some of the most positive rankings. • When asked about their intentions to stay, Chinese workers gave 74% positive responses. • For the statement: “Working at my organisation makes me want to do the best I can”, responses were 73% positive. As the markets have shifted and countries like China and India have experienced significant growth, it would seem engagement has risen hand in hand. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in China has swelled at an astonishing rate, expanding 9.7% in the first quarter of 2011 over the same quarter last year. Rory MacNeill, Global Managing Director of ORC International’s Employee Research division comments: “The combination of China’s thriving economy and the increased importance placed on engagement seems to be having a positive impact on the population’s satisfaction in their working lives. Such high scores in these emotional questions suggest a workforce truly engaged in their jobs. It will be interesting to see how this trend develops into 2012 and whether China’s employee engagement will continue to rise in line with the growth of its economy.” In contrast, employee engagement in Hong Kong has stayed the same for the past 12 months. In Hong Kong, the overall engagement score remains seven points below the global norm at 50%. In 16th position overall, they remain at the bottom of the rankings, just in front of the UK (also with a 50% EEI score), and Japan (42% EEI). India remains on top of the rankings, with an 8% increase from 2010 to 74% overall. Japan continues to be the least engaged workforce. Only 33% respondents in Japan believe they work for a good organisation compared to others they know about and 29% believe their organisation motivates them to contribute more than is normally required of their work. About the survey ORC International’s global perspectives survey took place in March 2011. It gathers the opinions of employees in 18 countries, and explores the picture of global employee engagement. With the exception of the Netherlands, a sample quota was specified geographically and achieved for each country. A response was considered valid if at least five attitudinal questions were complete; otherwise it was removed from the analysis. As such, the number of actual returns included in the analysis differs slightly from the target sample size. There were a total of 9,246 returns. About ORC International ORC International is a leading global research firm with offices across the U.S., Europe and Asia Pacific. The company offers a platform of integrated intelligence that combines forward thinking methodologies, cutting-edge technology, skilled researchers and in-depth industry experience to provide clients with valuable insight to help solve their most pressing business challenges. Specifically, the company has over 25 years of employee research experience and manages some of the largest employee-related research/surveys worldwide. To learn more about ORC International, visit www.orcinternational.co.uk Poor perception of management drives Australian employee engagement down in 2011 2011-10-13T10:34:40Z poor-perception-of-management-drives-australian-employee-engagement-down-in-2011 (MELBOURNE, VIC) The overall picture of employee engagement in Australia is lagging in 2011. According to the latest ORC International global perspectives survey, this year, the country fell four places in the global engagement rankings. Meanwhile, engagement in countries like the China and India is soaring. This year in particular, employees’ trust and confidence in senior management seems to be having a strong influence on their engagement. Looking at the perception of leadership as a whole, China and India were well above the 2011 overall average of 56% at 66% and 74% respectively. In contrast, only half of Australian respondents (50%) agreed that their organisation is well managed as a whole, which is 6 percentage points lower than the response to the same question last year (56%). ORC International’s statistical analysis identified the three questions that have had the greatest impact on engagement scores. Two of these relate to management. ‘My organisation as a whole is well managed’ – Australian employees were only 48% positive ‘There is a positive relationship between management and staff in this organisation’ - Employees were 50% positive in Australia ‘I truly enjoy my day-to-day work tasks / activities’ - Staff were 59% positive in Australia (above the global norm) While scores relating to the general enjoyment of their jobs were in line with global averages, for Australia, compared to other countries, the perceptions on management were downbeat. This has had a big negative impact on Australia’s overall engagement in 2011. ORC International’s Doug Gilbert, Employee Research Executive, Asia Pacific, comments: “To catch up with the rest of the world, it is crucial that effective management is a focus in long term plans. This is what is driving positive scores in other countries like China and India. Conversely, its absence is influencing such low engagement in Australia.” The Australian employment market is generally perceived as strong. There are lots of jobs to choose from, and employees enjoy good pay rates and a healthy work / life balance. However, these characteristics alone are not delivering an engaged workforce by global comparisons. China’s engagement index had the most dramatic increase of any country from 2010, jumping seven places to second overall in the 2011 global engagement rankings. India remains on top with an overall engagement ranking of 74%; up from 66% in last year’s survey. About the survey ORC International’s global perspectives survey took place in March 2011. It gathers the opinions of employees in 18 countries, and explores the picture of global employee engagement. With the exception of the Netherlands, a sample quota was specified geographically and achieved for each country. A response was considered valid if at least five attitudinal questions were complete; otherwise it was removed from the analysis. As such, the number of actual returns included in the analysis differs slightly from the target sample size. There were a total of 9,246 returns. About ORC International ORC International is a leading global research firm with offices across the U.S., Europe and Asia Pacific. The company offers a platform of integrated intelligence that combines forward thinking methodologies, cutting-edge technology, skilled researchers and in-depth industry experience to provide clients with valuable insight to help solve their most pressing business challenges. Specifically, the company has over 25 years of employee research experiences and manages some of the largest employee-related research/surveys worldwide. To learn more about ORC International, visit www.orcinternational.com.au Data shows Hong Kong’s workforce is negative about work, but upbeat on management 2011-07-13T14:37:10Z data-shows-hong-kong-s-workforce-is-negative-about-work-but-upbeat-on-management-1 (HONG KONG, CHINA) – According to the latest statistics from ORC International’s perspectives database, employees in Hong Kong are dissatisfied and uninspired at work, but positive on pay, recognition and management. perspectives gathers the accumulated opinions of employees on a wide range of subjects related to their levels of engagement. The database contains the results of more than 400 organisations’ employee surveys, representing the views of approximately 1.4 million people from around the world. For each question asked, the scores have been ranked among the responses of other nations (specifically the UK, USA and Australia) to gauge Hong Kong’s position in the global employer environment. Questions relating to work and stress received responses that were far more negative than other nations. When employees in Hong Kong were asked if they like the work they do, they recorded the lowest positive responses, with just 55% in agreement. In the UK, the sentiment was much more positive, with 84% in agreement. This result also compares to 83% in the USA and 78% in Australia. The negative perception continued across a number of other work related questions. When presented with the statement, ‘Considering everything I am satisfied with the job I do’, Hong Kong employees were bottom again, with 62% in agreement. Of the counties included in perspectives, Hong Kong also had the lowest positive responses for statements regarding: • Personal accomplishment (56% positive) • Intention to stay (64% positive) • Satisfaction with the company (58% positive) Another telling statistic relates to the sense of pride and belonging Hong Kong employees have; when asked if they were proud of their company, the response was just 47% positive. Here you can see the clear divide between the east and west. For the same question, respondents in the USA, UK and Australia ranked in the low 70s. This negative outlook is somewhat offset by Hong Kong employees’ satisfaction with management. They had the highest number of positive responses when asked about the recognition they got for doing a good job (64% positive). Pay was another area the Hong Kong workforce were upbeat on, with 54% agreeing that they thought their pay was fair. On this topic they were almost on par with the top scorer, Australian employees, who were 55% positive on remuneration. Information for editors The perspectives database contains the results of more than 400 organisations’ employee surveys, representing the views of approximately 1.4 million people from around the world. The questions asked employees about workplace topics including their job, manager, communication, resources, pay and benefits, work/life balance, training and development and perceptions of their organisation. The questions were poised as statements where respondents plot their answers on a Likert scale between ‘Strongly agree’ and ‘Strongly disagree’ with ‘Neither agree nor disagree’ in the middle. The results were then produced as ‘percentage positive scores’ – this is the percentage of respondents that selected either ‘Agree’ or ‘Strongly agree’. About ORC International ORC International is a leading global market research firm with offices across the US, Europe and Asia Pacific region. ORC International offers the unique ability to integrate primary and secondary research, competitive intelligence and expert insight to address the business challenges of its clients worldwide. To learn more about ORC International, visit www.orcinternational.co.uk Data shows Australians are a satisfied workforce, with no worries over job security 2011-07-13T08:40:55Z data-shows-australians-are-a-satisfied-workforce-with-no-worries-over-job-security (SYDNEY, NSW) – According to the latest statistics from ORC International’s perspectives database, Australian employees enjoy a low-pressure, stress-free working life, and have little concern about losing their jobs. perspectives gathers the accumulated opinions of employees on a wide range of subjects related to their levels of engagement. The database contains the results of more than 400 organisations’ employee surveys, representing the views of approximately 1.4 million people from around the world. For each question asked, the scores have been ranked among the responses of other nations (specifically the UK, USA and Hong Kong), gauging Australia’s position in the global employer environment. Australia ranked top with 75% agreeing with the statement, ‘Considering everything I am satisfied with the job I do’. They were also upbeat on job security with 66% agreeing with the statement, ‘I feel secure in my job’. On the same subject, 60% of respondents in the USA agreed, and just 52% in the UK. Of the counties included, Australia also had the highest positive responses for statements regarding: • Communication (68% positive) • Team cooperation (84% positive) • Fairness and respect (78% positive) • Staff numbers (52% positive) On top of this widely optimistic outlook, employees in Australia were also in high spirits about their remuneration packages. Again, they were the top scoring country with 57% agreeing with the statement, ‘Considering my duties and responsibilities, I feel my pay is fair’. The figure was far lower in the UK, with only 47% of employees satisfied with their salaries. This picture of tranquility is also backed up by Australians’ views on their work / life balance, with 68% positive responses, compared to 69% in the UK, 66% in the USA, and 62% in Hong Kong. Australian employees also felt they had a good understanding of their own jobs and the company as a whole. 85% agreed that are clear on what they are expected to achieve in their jobs. The same percentage also felt they understood how they contributed to the success of the company. Interestingly, Australians did not think that poor performance was being effectively dealt with where they work, with just 34% responding positively on this subject. This suggests that while work is a comfortable, satisfying experience, employees are not pushed hard enough or picked up on when they perform badly. Of the benchmarked countries, Australia also had the lowest positive responses when employees were asked if they thought their company was an equal opportunity employer. Respondents were 74% positive compared to 78% in the UK and 81% in the USA. Information for editors The perspectives database contains the results of more than 400 organisations’ employee surveys, representing the views of approximately 1.4 million people from around the world. The questions asked employees about workplace topics including their job, manager, communication, resources, pay and benefits, work/life balance, training and development and perceptions of their organisation. The questions were poised as statements where respondents plot their answers on a Likert scale between ‘Strongly agree’ and ‘Strongly disagree’ with ‘Neither agree nor disagree’ in the middle. The results were then produced as ‘percentage positive scores’ – this is the percentage of respondents that selected either ‘Agree’ or ‘Strongly agree’. About ORC International ORC International is a leading global market research firm with offices across the US, Europe and Asia Pacific region. ORC International offers the unique ability to integrate primary and secondary research, competitive intelligence and expert insight to address the business challenges of its clients worldwide. To learn more about ORC International, visit www.orcinternational.co.uk