The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2017-04-04T04:56:39Z A Brand New McAfee Commits to Building a Safer Future 2017-04-04T04:56:39Z a-brand-new-mcafee-commits-to-building-a-safer-future NEWS HIGHLIGHTS - McAfee announces new status as a standalone cybersecurity company dedicated to enabling technology, people and organisations to work together - Closing of previously announced investment from TPG Capital and Intel that valued the company at $4.2 billion USD - In connection with the close of this transaction, Thoma Bravo joins as a minority investor through an agreement with TPG - Partnership provides McAfee with capital to accelerate growth and enhance focus as a standalone business - Previous Intel Security general manager Christopher Young named McAfee CEO 
Santa Clara, Calif., April 4, 2017 – McAfee (the “Company”), the globally trusted security provider, announced today that it has begun operating as a new standalone company. As a standalone business, McAfee is one of the world’s largest pure-play cybersecurity firms. Built on the belief that “Together is Power,” the new McAfee will expand upon its leading security solutions platform to better enable customers to effectively identify and orchestrate responses to cyber-threats. 
The launch of McAfee marks the closing of the previously announced investment by TPG and Intel Corporation (INTC) to establish a pure-play cybersecurity company with access to significant capital, operational and technology resources. Additionally, McAfee announced that leading private equity investment firm Thoma Bravo has joined, as a minority investor in the Company, through an agreement with TPG. As previously announced, Intel is retaining a 49 percent equity stake in the new entity. 
With the help of its new investment partners, McAfee will apply greater market focus, build its platform and target new financial, operational and technology investments to better address the cybersecurity market’s significant global growth opportunity. Intel Senior Vice President and General Manager Chris Young will lead the new McAfee as Chief Executive Officer. TPG Partner Bryan Taylor has been named Chairman of the Board. 
“Cybersecurity is the greatest challenge of the connected age, weighing heavily on the minds of parents, executives and world leaders alike,” said Christopher Young, CEO of McAfee. “As a standalone company with a clear purpose, McAfee gains the agility to unite people, technology and organisations against our common adversaries and ensure our technology-driven future is safe.”
 “We offer Chris Young and the McAfee team our full support as they establish themselves as one of the largest pure-play cybersecurity companies in the industry,” said Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO. “Security remains important to Intel, and in addition to our equity position and ongoing collaboration with McAfee, Intel will continue to integrate industry-leading security and privacy capabilities in our products from the cloud to billions of smart, connected computing devices.” “Since its founding, McAfee has been dedicated to offering its customers industry-leading cybersecurity solutions,” said Bryan Taylor, Partner at TPG Capital and Chairman of the Board at McAfee. “Its ongoing commitment to product innovation, a rich partner ecosystem, and superior customer service has created a trusted brand that will thrive as a standalone entity. We look forward to working with the company and our partners to accelerate growth and continue building a leading cybersecurity platform that serves to protect customers in today’s changing environment.” “McAfee is a global organisation with a 30-year history and a brand known the world over for innovation, trust and collaboration. Given our years of focus on the security software sector, we see great opportunity for McAfee to continue to advance and innovate,” said Seth Boro, a Managing Partner at Thoma Bravo. “Our deep sector knowledge and history of helping build successful businesses will be an asset to the company, and we look forward to working with the management team and our colleagues at TPG and Intel to guide McAfee through its next chapter of growth.” The New McAfee The company also outlined a new strategic vision, focused on innovation, trust, and collaboration. Innovation McAfee represents more than 7,500 of the industry’s most talented cybersecurity professionals, while holding more than 1,200 security technology patents and ongoing industry recognition for its products. McAfee is also home to McAfee Labs, one of the world’s leading sources for cyber-threat intelligence. McAfee’s people, technology and insights enable McAfee solutions to correlate real-world data collected from millions of sensors across key threat vectors and inform the next generations of McAfee product innovation. Trust From the moment the first worm was unleashed on the internet in 1988, to the massive 2016 Mirai distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, the cybersecurity industry has witnessed exponential growth in the volume and variety of cyber-threats. For the last three decades, McAfee has earned the trust of consumers, businesses and governments by delivering practical solutions to address these threats. Today, McAfee’s award winning products and solutions today protect more than 74.9 million endpoints daily, including 87% of the world’s largest banks and Fortune 100 firms and more than 263 million consumer endpoints. Collaboration McAfee believes in the power of working together—only when people, technology and organisations work together can we become safer. The McAfee Security Innovation Alliance, the industry’s premier technology partnering program, boasts more than 135 partners globally. Over the past year, more than 30 partners have integrated or planned integrations with the McAfee Data Exchange Layer (DXL), the industry- endorsed communication fabric providing real-time interaction between applications. Goldman Sachs, & Co., Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, RBC Capital Markets, and UBS Investment Bank served as financial advisors to TPG and Thoma Bravo, and Allen & Company LLC served as financial advisor to Intel. Ropes & Gray served as legal advisors to TPG, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP served as legal advisors to Intel, and Kirkland & Ellis served as legal advisors to Thoma Bravo. About McAfee McAfee is one of the world’s leading independent cybersecurity companies. Inspired by the power of working together, McAfee creates business and consumer solutions that make the world a safer place. www.mcafee.com About Intel Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) expands the boundaries of technology to make the most amazing experiences possible. Information about Intel can be found at newsroom.intel.com and intel.com. About TPG TPG is a leading global alternative asset firm founded in 1992 with more than $74 billion USD of assets under management and offices in Austin, Beijing, Boston, Dallas, Fort Worth, Hong Kong, Houston, Istanbul, London, Luxembourg, Melbourne, Moscow, Mumbai, New York, San Francisco, São Paulo, and Singapore. TPG’s investment platforms are across a wide range of asset classes, including private equity, growth venture, real estate, credit, and public equity. TPG aims to build dynamic products and options for its investors while also instituting discipline and operational excellence across the investment strategy and performance of its portfolio. For more information, visit http://www.tpg.com/. About Thoma Bravo Thoma Bravo is a leading private equity firm focused on the software and technology-enabled services sectors. With a series of funds representing more than $17 billion USD in capital commitments, Thoma Bravo partners with a company’s management team to implement operating best practices, invest in growth initiatives and make accretive acquisitions intended to accelerate revenue and earnings, with the goal of increasing the value of the business. Representative past and present portfolio companies include industry leaders such as Blue Coat Systems, Deltek, Digital Insight, Global Healthcare Exchange, Hyland Software, PowerPlan, Riverbed, SolarWinds, SonicWall, Sparta Systems and TravelClick. The firm has offices in San Francisco and Chicago. For more information, visit www.thomabravo.com. New Global Cybersecurity Report Reveals Misaligned Incentives, Executive Overconfidence Creates Advantages for Attacker 2017-03-01T23:16:00Z new-global-cybersecurity-report-reveals-misaligned-incentives-executive-overconfidence-creates-advantages-for-attacker NEWS HIGHLIGHTS  New report from Intel Security, CSIS, finds three key areas of misaligned incentives that advantage cybercriminals: 
  - Between fluid attackers and bureaucratic defenders
  - Between organisational strategy and real-world/actual implementation   - Between executives and implementers who measure success differently 
 Attackers thrive in a fluid, decentralised market, while bureaucracy and top-down decision making constrains defenders  92 percent of Australian organisations surveyed have a cybersecurity strategy, but only 42 percent have fully implemented these strategies (93 percent and 49 percent globally)  Nearly 60 percent of IT executives believe their cybersecurity strategy is fully implemented, while just over 30 percent of IT staff agree.  56 percent of Australian cybersecurity professionals say their role lacks incentives while 60 percent believe their organisation is more concerned about its reputation than cybersecurity itself 
Senior executives designing cyber strategies measure success differently than the implementers who put these strategies into practice, limiting their effectiveness. 
 SYDNEY, Australia, March 2, 2017 – Intel Security, in partnership with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), today released “Tilting the Playing Field: How Misaligned Incentives Work Against Cybersecurity,” a global report and survey revealing three categories of misaligned incentives: corporate structures versus the free flow of criminal enterprises; strategy versus implementation; and senior executives versus those in implementation roles. The report highlights ways organisations can learn from cybercriminals to correct these misalignments. Based on interviews and a global survey of 800 cybersecurity professionals from five industry sectors, the report outlines how cybercriminals have the advantage, thanks to the incentives for cybercrime creating a big business in a fluid and dynamic marketplace. Defenders on the other hand, often operate in bureaucratic hierarchies, making them hard-pressed to keep up. 
 Additional misalignments occur within Australian defenders’ organisations. For instance, while more than 90 percent of organisations report having a cybersecurity strategy, less than half (42%) have fully implemented them. What’s more, 78 percent of Australian cybersecurity professionals said their organisations have been affected by cybersecurity breaches (83 percent globally), indicating a disconnect between strategy and implementation. And while cybercriminals have a direct incentive for their work, the survey not only shows that are there few incentives for Australian cybersecurity professionals (56 percent say their role lacks incentives), but that executives were much more confident than operational staff about the effectiveness of the existing incentives. For example, 60 percent of executives surveyed believe financial incentives are in place compared to only 36 percent of employees. A further 60 percent of Australian employees believe that their organisation is more concerned about its reputation than cybersecurity itself. “Cybercriminals have a clear financial incentive for their work and are rewarded for innovation and the sharing of information and workings,” said Daryush Ashjari, Intel Security APAC Vice President. “The price of cybercrime is reason enough to learn from the way cybercriminals work and introduce direct incentives for employees as well as increased transparency within businesses. In turn, this will help to increase responsiveness to cyber attacks and ensure that businesses are as nimble and agile as the criminals they seek to apprehend.” “It’s easy to come up with a strategy, but execution is tough,” says Denise Zheng, director and senior fellow, technology policy program at CSIS. “How governments and companies address their misaligned incentives will dictate the effectiveness of their cybersecurity programs. It’s not a matter of ‘what’ needs to be done, but rather determining ‘why’ it’s not getting done, and ‘how’ to do it better.” Other key global findings of the report include the following:  - Non-executives are three times more likely than executives to view shortfalls in funding and staffing as causing problems for the implementation of their cybersecurity strategy  - Even though incentives for cybersecurity professionals are lacking, 65 percent are personally motivated to strengthen their organisations cybersecurity  - Ninety-five percent of organisations have experienced effects of cybersecurity breaches, including disruption of operations, loss of IP, harm to reputation and company brand, among other effects. But only 32 percent report experiencing revenue or profit loss, which could lead to a false sense of security.  - The government sector was the least likely to report having a fully-implemented cybersecurity strategy (38 percent). This sector also had a higher share of agencies with inadequate funding (58 percent) and staff (63 percent) than the private sector (33 percent and 43 percent). The report also suggests ways that the defender community can learn from the attacker communities. These include:  - Opting for security-as-a-service to counter the cybercrime-as-a-service model of the criminal market.  - Using public disclosure.  - Increasing transparency.  - Lowering barriers to entry for the cyber talent pool.  - Aligning performance incentives from senior leadership down to operators. The good news, according to the report’s authors, is that most companies recognise the seriousness of the cybersecurity problem and are willing to address it. Organisations need more than tools to combat cyber attackers; experimentation is necessary to determine the right mix of metrics and incentives for each organisation as they approach cybersecurity through more than just a cost-conscious framework and become more innovative in their organisational structure and processes. For more information about these findings and to view the full report, visit: www.mcafee.com/misaligned Methodology Intel commissioned independent technology market research specialist Vanson Bourne to undertake the research upon which this report is based. Intel surveyed more than 800 respondents from companies ranging in size from 500 employees to more than 5,000 across five major industry sectors, including Finance, Healthcare and the Public Sector. The survey targeted respondents with executive level responsibility for cybersecurity, as well as operators that have technical and implementation responsibilities for cybersecurity. Countries represented by respondents include the United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Brazil, Japan, Singapore, Australia, and Mexico. About Intel Security Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com. MCAFEE LABS THREATS PREDICTIONS REPORT PREVIEWS CYBER THREATS FOR 2017 AND BEYOND 2016-11-29T23:31:49Z mcafee-labs-threats-predictions-report-previews-cyber-threats-for-2017-and-beyond SYDNEY, Australia. November 30, 2016 – Intel® Security today released its McAfee Labs 2017 Threats Predictions Report, which identifies 14 threat trends to watch in 2017, the most critical developments to watch for in cloud security and the Internet of Things (IoT) security, and the six most difficult-to-solve challenges facing the cybersecurity industry. The report reflects the informed opinions of 31 Intel Security thought leaders. It examines current trends in cybercrime and makes predictions about what the future may hold for organisations working to take advantage of new technologies to both advance their businesses and provide better security protection. “To change the rules of the game between attackers and defenders, we need to neutralise our adversaries’ greatest advantages,” said Vincent Weafer, vice president of Intel Security’s McAfee Labs. “As a new defensive technique is developed, its effectiveness increases until attackers are compelled to develop countermeasures to evade it. To overcome the designs of our adversaries, we need to go beyond understanding the threat landscape to changing the defender-attacker dynamics in six key areas: information asymmetry, making attacks more expensive, improving visibility, better identifying exploitation of legitimacy, improving protection for decentralised data, and detecting and protecting in agentless environments.” 2017 Threats Predictions The 2017 threats predictions run the gamut, including threats around ransomware, sophisticated hardware and firmware attacks, attacks on “smart home” IoT devices, the use of machine learning to enhance social engineering attacks, and an increase in cooperation between industry and law enforcement: 1.     Ransomware attacks will decrease in volume and effectiveness in the second half of 2017. 2.     Windows vulnerability exploits will continue to decline, while those targeting infrastructure software and virtualisation software will increase. 3.     Hardware and firmware will be increasingly targeted by sophisticated attackers. 4.     Hackers using software running on laptops will attempt “dronejackings” for a variety of criminal or hacktivist purposes. 5.     Mobile attacks will combine mobile device locks with credential theft, allowing cyber thieves to access such things as banks accounts and credit cards. 6.     IoT malware will open backdoors into the connected home that could go undetected for years. 7.     Machine learning will accelerate the proliferation of and increase the sophistication of social engineering attacks. 8.     Fake ads and purchased “likes” will continue to proliferate and erode trust. 9.     Ad wars will escalate and new techniques used by advertisers to deliver ads will be copied by attackers to boost malware delivery capabilities. 10.  Hacktivists will play an important role in exposing privacy issues. 11.  Leveraging increased cooperation between law enforcement and industry, law enforcement takedown operations will put a dent in cybercrime. 12.   Threat intelligence sharing will make great developmental strides in 2017. 13.  Cyber espionage will become as common in the private sector and criminal underworld as it is among nation-states. 14.  Physical and cybersecurity industry players will collaborate to harden products against digital threats.   For more information on the 2017 McAfee Labs predictions, please see the blog post entitled “2017 Predictions Blog”. Cloud Security and Internet of Things Predictions McAfee Labs also provided predictions for IoT and Cloud security during the next two to four years, including threat, economic, policy, and regional trends likely to shape each area. Gathering insights from Intel Security researchers, the following predictions also anticipate the responses we expect to see from device manufacturers, cloud service providers, and security vendors. The Cloud predictions touched on topics such as trust in the cloud, storage of intellectual property, antiquated authentication, east-west and north-south attack vectors, gaps in coverage between service layers, for-hire hackers in the cloud, “denial of service for ransom” attacks, IoT implications for cloud security models, laws and litigation versus innovation, movement of data across borders, biometrics as cloud enablers, cloud access security brokers (CASBs), protection of data at rest and in motion, machine learning, cyber insurance, and ongoing conflicts pitting speed, efficiency, and cost against control, visibility, and security in cloud offerings.  For more detail and insight on the report’s Cloud predictions, please see the blog entitled “You can outsource the work, but you cannot outsource the risk.” The IoT predictions focused on cybercrime economics, ransomware, hacktivism, nation-state attacks on criminal infrastructure, challenges for device makers, privacy threats and opportunities, encryption, behavioral monitoring, and cyber insurance and risk management. For more detail and insight on the report’s IoT predictions, please see the blog entitled “Welcome to the Wild West, again!”  Six Critical Industry Challenges The difficult-to-solve problems section of the report challenges the industry to improve threat defense effectiveness by reducing information asymmetry between defenders and attackers, making attacks more expensive or less profitable, improving visibility into cyber events, better identifying exploitation of legitimacy, improving protection for decentralised data, and detecting and protecting in agentless environments. For more insight on McAfee Labs’ six hard-to-solve problems, please see the blog entitled “Big hard to solve problems.” For more information, please read the full report: McAfee Labs 2017 Threats Predictions Report.  About McAfee Labs McAfee Labs is the threat research division of Intel Corporation’s Intel Security Group, and one of the world’s leading sources for threat research, threat intelligence, and cybersecurity thought leadership. The McAfee Labs team of researchers collects threat data from millions of sensors across key threat vectors—file, web, message, and network. It then performs cross-vector threat correlation analysis and delivers real-time threat intelligence to tightly integrated McAfee endpoint, content, and network security products through its cloud-based McAfee Global Threat Intelligence service. McAfee Labs also develops core threat detection technologies—such as application profiling, and graylist management—that are incorporated into the broadest security product portfolio in the industry. About Intel Security McAfee Labs is now part of Intel Security. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique McAfee Global Threat Intelligence, Intel Security is intensively focused on developing proactive, proven security solutions and services that protect systems, networks, and mobile devices for business and personal use around the world. Intel Security combines the experience and expertise of McAfee with the innovation and proven performance of Intel to make security an essential ingredient in every architecture and on every computing platform. The mission of Intel Security is to give everyone the confidence to live and work safety and securely in the digital world. www.intelsecurity.com Intel, the Intel logo, McAfee, and the McAfee logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries. *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. New McAfee Survey Reveals Less Than Half of Australians Take the Proper Security Measures to Protect Their New Gadgets 2016-11-22T01:21:33Z new-mcafee-survey-reveals-less-than-half-of-australians-take-the-proper-security-measures-to-protect-their-new-gadgets NEWS HIGHLIGHTS • Survey reveals that 74% of Aussies will buy Christmas presents online this year • The Christmas season brings new gifts, and while 80% start using connected devices within the first day of receiving them, less than half (44%) are confident they take the proper security measures • A further 46% are uncertain whether they are taking the proper security steps to do so SYDNEY Nov. 22, 2016 – Today Intel Security announced its second-annual McAfee Most Hackable Christmas Gifts list to identify potential security risks associated with hot-ticket items this holiday season. The No. 1 most hackable gift category included laptops and PCs, followed by smartphones and tablets, media players and streaming sticks, smart home automation and devices, and finally, drones. To accompany the list, Intel Security conducted a survey to identify the risky behaviours Australians are engaging in during the Christmas period and educate them on how to protect themselves. Today’s digital world is changing fast, and our reliance on the internet is ever increasing. The recent distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack (America) was carried out by a botnet made up of unsecured webcams and other internet of things (IoT) devices, and crippled many popular websites connected to the Dyn domain. It’s important that consumers understand they can help fight these attacks by ensuring their devices are updated and patched, which helps mitigate risks from the latest threats. “It’s not surprising to learn that connected devices remain high on Christmas wish lists this year, with smartphones and tablets topping the list. However, what is surprising is the number of Australians who aren’t sure whether they’re putting the appropriate measures in place to protect their devices,” said Andrew Hurren, Regional Solution Architect at Intel Security ANZ. “Just as consumers are eager to use their devices as soon as they can, cybercriminals are even keener to use this lack of attention to security to their advantage, and swiftly gather personal consumer data. This could expose consumers to malware or identity theft or even use unsecured devices to launch DDoS attacks as in the recent Dyn attack,” Hurren continued. While a majority of Aussies are aware of the vulnerabilities in older connected devices like laptops (74%), mobile phones (69%) and tablets (64%), they lack awareness about the potential risks associated with emerging connected devices, such as drones (18%), children’s toys (13%), virtual reality tech (15%), and pet gifts (10%). As technology continues to evolve, it is essential that Australians understand the risks associated with even the most unassuming devices. While 78% of consumers believe it’s very important to secure their online identities and connected devices, nearly half are uncertain if they are taking the proper security steps. This year’s Most Hackable Christmas Gifts: To create the list of Most Hackable Christmas Gifts, Intel Security analysed the list of popular devices for a range of factors including accessibility, communication security, target value (whether these devices have access to information that would be valuable to a cyber criminal), activity (whether the hacking community is actively researching how to exploit these devices), and whether there are any active exploits roaming the internet looking for these devices. 1. Laptops and PCs - Laptops and PCs make great gifts, however, malicious apps targeting PCs are unfortunately common, and are not just limited to Windows-based devices. 2. Smartphones and Tablets - Survey results revealed that 65% of consumers plan to purchase either a smartphone or tablet this holiday season. Just like PCs and laptops, malware could result in personal and financial information being stolen. 3. Media Streaming Devices Media players and streaming sticks have changed the way consumers enjoy movies and TV, but consumers can unknowingly invite a cybercriminal into their living room by failing to update their device. 4. Smart Home Automation Devices and Apps - Today’s connected home devices and apps give users the power to control their homes from their smartphone. Unfortunately, hackers have demonstrated techniques that could be used to compromise Bluetooth powered door locks and other home automation devices. 5. Drones - Drone sales are expected to grow to more than US$20 billion by 2022. They can provide unique perspectives when it comes to shooting video and photos. However, not properly securing the device could allow hackers to disrupt the GPS signal, or hijack your drone through its smartphone app. Tips for Aussies to Protect Christmas Cheer: To stay protected for a happier and safer Christmas cyberseason, Intel Security has the following tips: • Secure your device before you start using it. Your laptop, smartphone or tablet are the keys to controlling your home and your personal information. Make sure you have comprehensive security software installed, like McAfee® Total Protection. • Only use secure Wi-Fi. Using your devices, such as your smart home applications, on public Wi-Fi could leave you and your home open to risk. Never allow your home devices to be directly exposed to the internet. • Keep software up-to-date. Apply patches as they are released from the manufacturer. Install manufacturer updates right away to ensure that your device is protected from the latest known threats. • Configure a strong password or PIN. Don’t use default passwords. If your device supports it, use multi-factor authentication (MFA) as it can include factors like a trusted device, your face, fingerprint, etc. to make your login more secure. • Check before you click. Be suspicious of links from people you do not know and always use internet security software to stay protected. Hover over the link to find a full URL of the link’s destination in the lower corner of your browser. • Do your research. Purchase devices that come with proper administration and management. Devices should possess the necessary processes to determine if something is wrong, communicate such events to their owners, and provide options to resolve issues. Find More Information: • To learn more about the list and survey, check out:  Blog post from Gary Davis: https://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/most-hackable-gifts-2016 Twitter: Follow @IntelSec_APAC for live online safety updates and tips. Use hashtag #safeholiday to discuss the Most Hackable Gifts of 2016 Survey Methodology The research was conducted online during September 2016 by OnePoll through a sample of over 1,000 Australian residents (aged 18-55+) who use internet-enabled devices on a daily basis. About Intel Security Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com. Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries. *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.  No computer system can be absolutely secure. REBEL(S) WITH A SECURITY CAUSE 2016-09-28T23:08:04Z rebel-s-with-a-security-cause SYDNEY, Australia, 29th September 2016 – Aussie female celebrities, Rebel Wilson, Rose Byrne and Delta Goodrem have been named by the 10th annual McAfee Most Dangerous CelebritiesTM study, published by Intel Security, as the riskiest Australian names to search for online. The past year has seen many high-profile cyber attacks on Australian businesses, online services, apps and new Wi-Fi enabled toys. With ransomware and malware attacks growing rapidly and consumer demand for real time information higher than ever, cybercriminals are continuing to leverage consumers’ ongoing fascination with celebrity news, such as TV shows, movie premieres, album releases and breakups to entice unsuspecting consumers to sites laden with malware, which enables them to steal passwords and personal information. Analysis of the Australian results revealed that actress Rebel Wilson led the list with a 10.5% risk of returning a malicious website. This year, Wilson famously hit the headlines when she sued several women’s lifestyle magazines for allegedly lying about her age, name and background, undoubtedly leading to increased searches for the actress from the public. Adding to this, the actress’s role in Valentine’s Day blockbuster “How to Be Single” and cameo appearance in cult comedy “Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie” have also contributed to her number one ranking. Further, Wilson’s often-controversial jokes and recent weight loss transformation attracted a great deal of public attention. Following in second place, Australian talents Rose Byrne and Delta Goodrem go head-to-head for the runner up spot, both with a 10% risk. Fresh from two Hollywood blockbuster series, “X-Men: Apocalypse” and “Bad Neighbors 2” it’s no surprise that Rose Byrne has climbed to the number two spot. News around her move to theatre and return to Australia to film classic children’s tale “Peter Rabbit” has increased the amount of online searches in her name. The birth of her first child Rocco earlier in the year also caught the attention of the public, as did her post-baby body. Australian singer-songwriter, TV host and actress Delta Goodrem tied with Byrne in second place with a 10% risk. It’s been a busy year for Delta with the release of a new no.1 album “Wings of the Wild,” her return to the judging panel for hit reality TV series “The Voice” and the announcement of her new role in Australian drama “House Husbands.” Her recent blossoming romance with rugby union star Drew Mitchell has also seen her rise to the top of another kind of list: the hottest Wives and Girlfriends (WAGs) of the Australian Ruby Union team, The Wallabies. Social media savvy country singer Keith Urban who released his ninth album titled “Ripcord” in May tied fourth with “Bondi Vet” star and popular TV host Dr. Chris Brown, both with a risk of 9.67%. Following in sixth place is internationally renowned and elusive singer Sia (9.33%) whose recent carpool karaoke video with James Corden went viral. A mixture of talent continued the remainder of the Most Dangerous Celebrities List with pop singer and Australian icon Kylie Minogue (9.22%), rapper and songwriter Iggy Azalea (8.56%), Hollywood sensation Margot Robbie (8.44%), Australian heartthrob and on-and-off boyfriend to Miley Cyrus Liam Hemsworth (8.44%) and finally “The Great Gatsby” star Joel Edgerton (8.44%) completing the list. The top Australian celebrities from this year’s study with the highest percentages of risk are: Position Celebrity Percentage of Risk 1 Rebel Wilson 10.5% = 2 Rose Byrne 10.0% = 2 Delta Goodrem 10.0% = 4 Keith Urban 9.67% = 4 Dr. Chris Brown 9.67% 6 Sia 9.33% 7 Kylie Minogue 9.22% 8 Iggy Azalea 8.56% = 9 Margot Robbie 8.44% = 9 Liam Hemsworth 8.44% = 9 Joel Edgerton 8.44% The 2016 Australian list showed a similar trend to the 2015 results with Aussie female celebrities dominating males at a ratio of seven to four and, like last year, are also slightly skewed towards acting talent over singers (six against five). “This year we’ve seen a ton of influential celebrity activity, from new movie releases, to weight-loss transformations and new A-list romances. Cybercriminals know that celebrity names are some of the most searched for terms online and will stop at nothing to exploit consumer habits and interests for personal gain,” said Melanie Duca, Head of APAC Consumer Marketing & Online for Intel Security. “Individuals need to be aware of this and stay alert when clicking on celebrity news sites for the latest gossip to make sure they’re not being lured to an unsafe site where their data could be compromised,” she concluded. Global Analysis On a global scale, kicking off her world tour this spring, comedian Amy Schumer has found her way to the number one spot. Chart-topping popstar Justin Bieber comes in second followed by “Today” show anchor and “The Voice” TV Host Carson Daly in third, and blockbuster movie star Will Smith in fourth. Rounding out the top 10 are Rihanna, Miley Cyrus, Chris Hardwick, Daniel Tosh, Selena Gomez and Kesha. Five of the top 10 included some of the most sensational chart-topping artists, whilst three comedians also crowded the top 10. The top global celebrities from this year’s study with the highest percentages of risk are: Position Celebrity Percentage 1 Amy Schumer 16.11% 2 Justin Bieber 15.00% 3 Carson Daly 13.44% 4 Will Smith 13.44% 5 Rihanna 13.33% 6 Miley Cyrus 12.67% 7 Chris Hardwick 12.56% 8 Daniel Tosh 11.56% 9 Selena Gomez 11.11% 10 Kesha 11.11% How You Can Stay Protected: Consumers can do their part by being vigilant in practising safe online behaviour with the following tips: - Think before you click! Are you looking for the latest episode of your favourite TV show? Don’t click on that third-party link. Instead, get your content directly from the original source to ensure you aren’t clicking on anything that could be malicious. - Use caution when searching for “torrent.” This is by far the riskiest search term. Cybercriminals can use torrents to embed malware within authentic files, making it difficult to determine if a file is safe. It’s best to avoid using torrents especially when there are so many legitimate streaming options available. - Keep your personal information personal. Cybercriminals are always looking for ways to steal your personal information. If you receive a request to enter information like your credit card, email, home address or social media login don’t give it out thoughtlessly. Do your research and ensure it’s not a phishing or scam attempt that could lead to identity theft. - Browse safely using protection like McAfee® WebAdvisor software. WebAdvisor will help keep you safe from malicious websites by helping to identify potentially risky sites. A complimentary version of the software can be downloaded at www.mcafee.com/mcafeewebadvisor - Use cross device protection. Consumers need to protect all facets of their digital lives regardless of where they are, what device they use or where they store their personal data. Use solutions that work across all your devices to deliver protection against threats, such as malware, hacking and phishing attacks. Find More Information:  ·       To learn more about the research, check out: - Blog post from Gary Davis: https://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/amy-schumer-dangerous-celebrities/ - Blog post from Alex Merton-McCann, Australian Cybermum: http://apac.intelsecurity.com/digitalsafety/2016/09/28/australias-most-dangerous-celebrities-of-2016/ - Twitter: Follow @IntelSec_APAC for live online safety updates and tips. Use hashtag #RiskyCeleb to discuss the Most Dangerous Celebrities of 2016 Web surfers can also visit the Intel Security Facebook page at www.facebook.com/IntelSecAPAC and McAfee Security Advice Center for information on the latest consumer threats and tips for living safe online. If you do decide to search for information on a major event or celebrity in the news, make sure your entire household’s devices have protection, such as McAfee LiveSafe™ service which helps protect most PCs, Macs and tablets and smartphones. It includes malware detection software, McAfee® Mobile Security for Android or iPhone and iPad, to better protect your smartphone or tablet from many types of malware.  Survey Methodology Intel Security conducted the study using McAfee® WebAdvisor site ratings to determine the number of risky sites generated by searches, on Google*, Bing* and Yahoo!*, that included a celebrity name and commonly searched terms (noted below) likely to yield malware. From that, an overall risk percentage was calculated for each celebrity. “Most dangerous” means that these celebrities are likely popular search subjects. McAfee SiteAdvisor technology helps protect users from malicious websites and browser exploits. SiteAdvisor technology tests and rates nearly every internet website it finds, and uses red, yellow and green icons to indicate the website’s risk level. Ratings are created by using patented advanced technology to conduct automated website tests and works with Internet Explorer*, Chrome* and Firefox*. Search terms included: o   “Celeb name + Torrent” o   “Celeb name + Free MP4” o   “Celeb name + HD download” The results indicated the percentage of risk of running into online threats – if a user clicked all the results generated by the terms. Fans clicking on sites deemed risky and downloading files including photos and videos from those sites may also be prone to downloading viruses and malware. About Intel Security Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com.    - ENDS -   Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.   *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. No computer system can be absolutely secure. Intel Security Names Kidman, Mauboy And Bondi Vet The 'Most Dangerous Celebrities' In Australia 2015-09-29T05:45:19Z intel-security-names-kidman-mauboy-and-bondi-vet-the-most-dangerous-celebrities-in-australia SYDNEY, Australia, 29th September 2015 – Aussie actors, musicians and TV personalities, Nicole Kidman, Jessica Mauboy and Dr Chris Brown have been named by the ninth annual Intel Security Most Dangerous CelebritiesTM list as the riskiest Australian names to search for online. With digital privacy becoming increasingly difficult to protect in our constantly switched on world, cybercriminals are always looking to take advantage of consumer interest around popular culture and events such as; celebrity breakups, album releases, awards shows and TV and movie premieres. With increased interest around particular well-known names, cybercriminals will often capitalise on this by enticing unsuspecting consumers to websites laden with malware, which enables them to steal passwords and personal information. Analysis of the Australian results revealed that Nicole Kidman led the list with a 12.5% risk of returning a malicious website.  This year, the actress’ return to stage, her high profile roles in Paddington and Strangerland and the ongoing headlines surrounding her love life with Keith Urban have seen her shoot straight to the top. Adding to this, Kidman was also criticised by airline unions regarding her appearance in a campaign for Etihad Airways, stating that it was at odds with her role as United Nations women’s goodwill ambassador. Despite good intentions, well-loved Jessica Mauboy came in a close second with a 12.4% risk, dropping from the number one spot in 2014. Her continued rise to stardom has seen her make the move to London and tackle a new genre of music with her hit single This Ain’t Love. Roles as ambassador for the Indigenous Literacy Foundation and Target have also boosted her loveable profile further within the Australian community. Dr Chris Brown has come a long way since the TV show ‘Bondi Vet.’ Now the butt of all good-looking jokes, the Sydney vet is a regular panelist on ‘The Project,’ co-host on ‘The Living Room’ and presenter of the Australian ‘I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!’ series. He has also recently made waves in the US and is known to American viewers as “Dr Chris – Pet Vet.” Named third in the list with a danger risk of 11.4%, Dr Brown is a new entrant in 2015 that cybercriminals are already savvy to and targeting searches around.   Fresh from her recent duet with Britney Spears (and subsequent Twitter feud), Australian rap sensation Iggy Azalea (10.7%), placed fourth in the list, followed by Muriel’s Wedding star and internationally renowned actress Toni Collette (10.4%). A mixture of talent continued the remainder of the top 10, with Braveheart star Mel Gibson (10.3%), country singer and husband to Nicole Kidman Keith Urban (9.6%) (down from third place in 2014), The Hobbit’s Hugo Weaving (9.4%), former ‘Neighbours’ star and pop sensation Kylie Minogue (9.2%) and Red Dog actress Rachael Taylor (9.0%) completing the list. The top 10 Australian celebrities from this year’s study with the highest percentages of risk are: Position Celebrity Percentage 1 Nicole Kidman 12.5% 2 Jessica Mauboy 12.4% 3 Dr. Chris Brown 11.4% 4 Iggy Azalea 10.7% 5 Toni Collette 10.4% 6 Mel Gibson 10.3% 7 Keith Urban 9.6% 8 Hugo Weaving 9.4% 9 Kylie Minogue 9.2% 10 Rachael Taylor 9.0%   The 2015 Australian list showed a gender reversal of the 2014 results, with female stars leading over males at a ratio of six to four.  The listings show a skew towards acting talent over singers (six against four) and has a focus on seasoned and established stars rather than new and emerging talent (six against four). “Appetite for news, gossip and free downloads is stronger than ever and the lure of the celebrity world means that consumers often click on links without checking the security of the sites they’re visiting,” says Melanie Duca, APAC Consumer Marketing Director for Intel Security. “With ransomware and malware attacks continuing to rise and cybercriminals becoming even more cunning in their targeting, consumers need to be aware of online security issues and ensure their personal data and privacy is protected at all times,” continued Duca.   Global Analysis On a global scale, Armin van Buuren is the first DJ and the third male to find his way to the number one spot (moving up from number two in 2014) following Brad Pitt in 2008 and Jimmy Kimmel in 2014. Usher takes the number three spot between Luke Bryan at number two and Britney Spears at number four. Rounding out the top 10 are Amy Schumer, Betty White, Lorde and Nina Dobrev. Seven of the top 10 are musical artists, ranging from EDM artists to country, hip hop and pop. The top 10 global celebrities from this year’s study with the highest percentages of risk are: Position Celebrity Percentage 1 Armin van Buuren 17.92% 2 Luke Bryan 17.64% 3 Usher 16.67% 4 Britney Spears 16.39% 5 Jay Z 15.83% 6 Katy Perry 14.86% 7 Amy Schumer 14.72% 8 Betty White 14.03% 9 Lorde 13.61% 10 Nina Dobrev 13.19%   How You Can Stay Protected: ·      Beware of clicking on third-party links. You should access content directly from official websites of content providers. For example, visit reputable site ComedyCentral.com to find Amy Schumer’s latest episodes ·      Use web protection that will notify you of risky sites or links before you visit them and it’s too late. Stick to official news sites for breaking news      Only download videos from well-known, legitimate sites. This should be common sense, but it bears repeating: don’t download anything from a website you don’t trust — especially video. Most news clips you’d want to see can easily be found on official video sites and don’t require you to download anything ·      Use caution when searching for “HD downloads.” This term is by far the highest virus-prone search term. Consumers searching for videos or files to download should be careful as not to unleash unsafe content such as malware onto their computers      Always use password protection on all mobile devices. If you don’t and your phone is lost or stolen, anyone who picks up the device could have access to your personal information online      Don’t “log in” or provide other information. If you receive a message, text or email or visit a third-party website that asks for your information — including your credit card, email, home address, Facebook login — to grant access to an exclusive story, don’t give it out. Such requests are a common tactic for phishing that could lead to identity theft      Search online using a tool, such as McAfee® WebAdvisor software, which protects users from malicious websites and browser exploits. A complimentary version the software can be downloaded at www.mcafee.com/mcafeewebadvisor   Find More Information:  ·        To learn more about the research, you can follow @IntelSecurity on Twitter for live online safety updates and tips. Use hashtag #RiskyCeleb to discuss the Most Dangerous Celebrities of 2015 ·       Web surfers can also visit the Intel Security Facebook page at www.facebook.com/intelsecurity and McAfee Security Advice Center for information on the latest consumer threats, and tips for living safe online ·        If you do decide to search for information on a major event or celebrity in the news, make sure your entire household’s devices have protection, such as McAfee LiveSafe™ service, which helps protect most PCs, Macs, and tablets and smartphones. It also includes malware detection software, McAfee® Mobile Security, to better protect your smartphone or tablet from many types of malware Survey Methodology The study was conducted using McAfee® WebAdvisor, using SiteAdvisor® site ratings to determine the number of risky sites that would be generated in search results including a celebrity name and commonly searched terms (noted below) and calculates an overall risk percentage for that celebrity. McAfee SiteAdvisor technology helps protect users from malicious websites and browser exploits. SiteAdvisor technology tests and rates nearly every Internet website it finds, and uses red, yellow and green icons to indicate the website’s risk level. Ratings are created by using patented advanced technology to conduct automated website tests and works with Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari and Firefox. On the global list, the terms “Armin van Buuren,” “Armin van Buuren HD downloads,” “Armin van Buuren free MP4,” and “Armin van Buuren torrent” were used to search for Armin van Buuren, and similar terms were used for each celebrity on the list. The results indicated the percentage of risk of running into online threats — if a user clicked all the results generated by the terms. Fans clicking on sites deemed risky and downloading files including photos and videos from those sites may also be prone to downloading viruses and malware. The same process was followed to search for local Australian celebrities.   About Intel Security McAfee is now part of Intel Security. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique Global Threat Intelligence, Intel Security is intensely focused on developing proactive, proven security solutions and services that protect systems, networks, and mobile devices for business and personal use around the world. Intel Security combines the experience and expertise of McAfee with the innovation and proven performance of Intel to make security an essential ingredient in every architecture and on every computing platform. Intel Security’s mission is to give everyone the confidence to live and work safely and securely in the digital world. www.intelsecurity.com.   No computer system can be absolutely secure.     ### Note: Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. McAfee, McAfee LiveSafe and the McAfee logo are trademarks of McAfee Inc. or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries.   *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.    © 2015 Intel Corporation McAfee Labs™ Report Reviews Five Years Of Hardware And Software Threat Evolution 2015-09-02T02:53:50Z mcafee-labs-report-reviews-five-years-of-hardware-and-software-threat-evolution Sydney, Australia – Tuesday 1st September, 2015 - Intel® Security today released its McAfee Labs Threats Report: August 2015, which includes a critique of graphics processing unit (GPU) malware claims, an investigation of the top cybercriminal exfiltration techniques, and a five-year retrospective on the evolution of the threat landscape since Intel Corporation’s announcement of the McAfee acquisition.  McAfee Labs commemorates the five-year anniversary of the Intel-McAfee union by comparing what researchers thought would happen beginning in 2010 with what actually happened in the realm of hardware and software security threats. Key researchers and executives reviewed our predictions on the security capabilities of silicon, the challenges of emerging hard-to-detect attacks, and our 2010 expectations for new device types versus the reality of the marketplace.  The five-year threat landscape analysis suggests: •Intel Security foresaw threats targeting hardware and firmware components and threatening runtime integrity •Increasingly evasive malware and long-running attacks did not surprise us but some of the specific tactics and techniques were unimagined five years ago •Although the volume of mobile devices has increased even faster than we expected, serious broad-based attacks on those devices has grown much more slowly than we thought •We are seeing just the beginnings of attacks and breaches against IoT devices •Cloud adoption has changed the nature of some attacks, as devices are attacked not for the small amount of data that they store, but as a path to where the important data resides •Cybercrime has grown into a full-fledged industry with suppliers, markets, service providers, financing, trading systems, and a proliferation of business models •Businesses and consumers still do not pay sufficient attention to updates, patches, password security, security alerts, default configurations, and other easy but critical ways to secure cyber and physical assets •The discovery and exploitation of core Internet vulnerabilities has demonstrated how some foundational technologies are underfunded and understaffed •There is growing, positive collaboration between the security industry, academia, law enforcement, and governments to take down cybercriminal operations “We were impressed by the degree to which three key factors – expanding attack surfaces, the industrialisation of hacking, and the complexity and fragmentation of the IT security market – accelerated the evolution of threats, and size and frequency of attacks,” said Vincent Weafer, senior vice president, Intel Security’s McAfee Labs. “To keep pace with such momentum, the cybersecurity community must continue to improve threat intelligence sharing, recruit more security professionals, accelerate security technology innovation, and continue to engage governments so they can fulfill their role to protect citizens in cyberspace.” The August report also probes into the details of three proofs-of-concept (PoC) for malware exploiting GPUs in attacks. While nearly all of today’s malware is designed to run from main system memory on the central processing unit (CPU), these PoCs leverage the efficiencies of these specialised hardware components designed to accelerate the creation of images for output to a display. The scenarios suggest hackers will attempt to leverage GPUs for their raw processing power, using them to evade traditional malware defenses by running code and storing data where traditional defenses do not normally watch for malicious code.  Reviewing the PoCs, Intel Security agrees that moving portions of malicious code off of the CPU and host memory reduces the detection surface for host-based defenses. However, researchers argue that, at a minimum, trace elements of malicious activity remain in memory or CPUs, allowing endpoint security products to detect and remediate threats. McAfee Labs also details techniques cybercriminals use to exfiltrate a wide variety of information on individuals from corporate networks: names, dates of birth, addresses, phone numbers, social security numbers, credit and debit card numbers, health care information, account credentials, and even sexual preferences. In addition to tactics and techniques used by attackers, this analysis examines attacker types, their motivations, and their likely targets, as well as the policies businesses should embrace to better detect exfiltration. The August 2015 report also identified a number of other developments in the second quarter of 2015: •Ransomware: Ransomware continues to grow very rapidly – with the number of new ransomware samples rising 58% in Q2. The total number of ransomware samples grew 127% from Q2 2014 to Q2 2015. We attribute the increase to fast-growing new families such as CTB-Locker, CryptoWall, and others •Mobile slump: The total number of mobile malware samples grew 17% in Q2. But mobile malware infection rates declined about 1% per region this quarter, with the exception of North America, which dropped almost 4%, and Africa, which was unchanged •Spam botnets: The trend of decreasing botnet-generated spam volume continued through Q2, as the Kelihos botnet remained inactive. Slenfbot again claims the top rank, followed closely by Gamut, with Cutwail rounding out the top three •Suspect URLs: Every hour in Q2 more than 6.7 million attempts were made to entice McAfee customers into connecting to risky URLs via emails, browser searches, etc. •Infected files: Every hour in Q2 more than 19.2 million infected files were exposed to McAfee customers’ networks •PUPs up: Every hour in Q2 an additional 7 million potentially unwanted programs (PUPs) attempted installation or launch on McAfee-protected networks For more information, please read the full report: McAfee Labs Threats Report: August 2015. For guidance on how organisations can better protect their enterprise from the threats detailed in this quarter’s report, please visit: Enterprise Blog.   About McAfee Labs McAfee Labs is the threat research division of Intel Security and one of the world’s leading sources for threat research, threat intelligence, and cybersecurity thought leadership. The McAfee Labs team of more than 400 researchers collects threat data from millions of sensors across key threat vectors—file, web, message, and network. It then performs cross-vector threat correlation analysis and delivers real-time threat intelligence to tightly integrated McAfee endpoint, content, and network security products through its cloud-based McAfee Global Threat Intelligence service. McAfee Labs also develops core threat detection technologies—such as application profiling, and graylist management—that are incorporated into the broadest security product portfolio in the industry. About Intel Security McAfee Labs is now part of Intel Security. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique McAfee Global Threat Intelligence, Intel Security is intensely focused on developing proactive, proven security solutions and services that protect systems, networks, and mobile devices for business and personal use around the world. Intel Security is combining the experience and expertise of McAfee with the innovation and proven performance of Intel to make security an essential ingredient in every architecture and on every computing platform. The mission of Intel Security is to give everyone the confidence to live and work safely and securely in the digital world. www.intelsecurity.com. No computer system can be absolutely secure.    Note: Intel and the Intel and McAfee logos, are trademarks of Intel Corporation or McAfee, Inc. in the US and/or other countries.  *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. ### PARENT-CHILD CYBER CONVERSATIONS ON THE RISE AS TEENS AND TWEENS GET REAL TO WORLDWIDE DIGITAL THREATS 2015-07-21T03:55:00Z parent-child-cyber-conversations-on-the-rise-as-teens-and-tweens-get-real-to-worldwide-digital-threats Sydney, Australia – July 21, 2015 – Incidences of cyberbullying are down and parent-child online transparency is up* according to the latest findings from Intel Security's Teens, Tweens and Technology Study 2015. In addition, the study found that 46% of Australia’s youth is interested in learning to program or write code, with 59% hoping to use their cyber skills for protecting individuals’ privacy from being stolen by cybercriminals and 40% for protecting people’s safety from attacks from terrorists. This year, 53% of teens and tweens said that they had witnessed cyberbullying (81% in 2014), with 16% saying that they had experienced it personally (39% in 2014). 87% of children said that they had discussed cyber issues with parents, showing a rise from the previous year’s 76%. The annual research presents a gauge on the behaviour and opinions of young Australians on online activity and was this year extended to include parental options and insight into future digital higher education and employment aspirations. Parental trust was also up according to the data, with fewer parents (75%) now looking to monitor their child's devices (91% in 2014) and more than two thirds (66%) 'friends' with their children online. This positive change showcases the impact of ongoing, open conversations and reinforces the need for parent-child conversations in order to help children remain vigilant about maintaining safe digital lives. Nearly half of parents, however, admitted showing more concern for their child’s online activity due to them using a mobile device (46%), being most interested in how much personal information their child is sharing (24%) and whether their child is unknowingly in contact with predators (23%). Australian youth upwardly social but continuing to take risks In 2015 across Australia, two in five tweens (aged 8-12) and teens (aged 13-17) spend more than two hours per day in front of a mobile device, with Facebook replacing YouTube as the most popular social media network for the audience. Despite the minimum age for Facebook, Instagram and Twitter being 13 years old, the research revealed that 36% of boys and 64% of girls aged 8-12 are active on the social media platforms, rising to 72% of boys and 81% of girls aged 13-16. Giving cause for concern, the results showed a rise in the number of teens and tweens creating fake social media account profiles in 2015, with two in five (38%) now admitting to hiding online activity from friends, classmates, parents and teachers through the method (13% in 2014). Despite the increase in trust, the research confirmed the need for parents to remain cautious given that one in three children still actively hide online activity from their parents (37%) and one in five would meet a stranger they had first met online (11%). Cybercrime - the new cyber education challenges for Australia's youth audience Replacing cyberbullying this year, disclosure of personal information is now the biggest online fear for both parents (67%) and children (62%), with bullying a secondary fear for both audiences (52% and 46% respectively). Interestingly, teens and tweens also identified being more worried about being hacked (34%) than interacting with strangers (28%) - versus nearly half of parents (47%) showing concern for stranger contact. A further 77% of teens and tweens said that in 2015 they are either ‘somewhat’ or ‘very concerned’ about cybercriminals targeting them online. Melanie Duca, APAC Consumer Marketing Director, Intel Security says, “This year’s data presents some fascinating and telling statements. Since we began our cyber education partnership with Life Education in 2013, our program has reached more than 235,000 students, so we’re very pleased to see that the parent-child cyber conversation is at the highest level we’ve seen. Australian kids are clearly savvier than ever before about both their own digital safety and that of the wider online environment – and that is a great achievement. “It’s encouraging to see that issues like cyberbullying seem to have lessened to some degree, but there’s a lot more that we can do especially with the youth of today being more social than ever before,” adds Melanie. The digital future for tweens and teens With the shift in concern displaying more awareness of wider global digital threats, there is increased interest across the youth audience for developing the skills to tackle the problems. 46% of teens and tweens said they are interested in learning more about code development for app and website building, whilst a further 43% said they would look to this industry for a future career – a sentiment echoed by parents, with a third saying they were hopeful that learning would help their child's future employment. In addition to protecting individuals’ online privacy and safety, Australian teens and tweens also identified a desire to protect companies from cybercriminals (37%) and protecting the country from outside attack (35%) as further motivations for the interest in cyber skills learning. Parenting expert Dr. Justin Coulson, adds, “The shift we’re seeing is an encouraging one which confirms that our teens and tweens are increasingly aware of the risks and rewards of online participation. Due to their digitally-connected nature, often youth will be aware of worldwide issues before parents – so I’m not surprised that this has been reflected in the data. “As teens and tweens’ online usage and participation increases, it’s great to see an increasing desire to take cyber skills further in education and employment. It’s now important that we as parents learn with our children as we progress into an increasingly-connected digital world,” continued Justin. Melanie adds, “This data represents the new challenge for our cyber education program and we have a great opportunity to use this data in our work with Life Education. With Alastair MacGibbon in office as e-Safety Commissioner, we’re looking forward to continuing our work with Life Education, the Government and industry to continue the ongoing efforts in keeping youth safe online.” For further information, please see attached Data Sheet and visit: http://intelsecurityapac.com/digitalsafety/  - ENDS - *2014 – 2015 comparisons have been drawn against statistics from two separate studies, each showing a national representative sample of youth responses. Additional Content Intel Security’s Cybermum, Alex Merton McCann, added Top 5 Cyber Parenting Tips to Help Facilitate Online Safety: Connect With Your Kids: Talk casually and frequently with them about the online risks, and make sure the communication lines are open. Foster discussions around relevant news stories or cases at schools Set Password Rules: To show camaraderie and trust, teens may share their social media passwords with friends or acquaintances. Friend or not, this is a dangerous practice, so ensure that your kids understand the importance of personal security Read App Reviews: Read the reviews for the apps your child is interested in, especially for any comments surrounding security. Personal recommendation is also great here, but another tips is to also encourage your kids to read the app’s review before they hit download Establish Rules Together: When everyone is calm, work out a set of online rules. You could even consider a formal Internet agreement or contract. Make sure you include time allowed online as well as what information can and can’t be shared online Up Your Tech Knowledge: Stay one step ahead and take the time to research the various devices your kids use – but also stay knowledgeable about the newest and latest social networks too. I would recommend creating accounts for the social networks that your kids are using, so that you fully understand what they’re interacting with About the research MSI International conducted 1,000 Australian interviews across 500 male and female parents of children aged 8-16 and 500 children aged 8-16. The online interviews were conducted from April 28-May 12, 2015. About Intel Security McAfee is now part of Intel Security. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique McAfee Global Threat Intelligence, Intel Security is intensively focused on developing proactive, proven security solutions and services that protect systems, networks, and mobile devices for business and personal use around the world. Intel Security is combining the experience and expertise of McAfee with the innovation and proven performance of Intel to make security an essential ingredient in every architecture and on every computing platform. The mission of Intel Security is to give everyone the confidence to live and work safely and securely in the digital world. www.intelsecurity.com. Intel, the Intel logo, McAfee and the McAfee logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. © 2015 Intel Corporation About Life Education Australia Life Education, as the largest non-government provider of health education to children and young people in Australia, has been a valued partner of Australian schools for over 35 years. It has 100 plus mobile learning centres and qualified educators across the country and reaches 640,000 children nationally. A registered charity, independent of both government and religion, Life Education aims to empower children and young people to make safer and healthier choices through education. It continues to do so by expanding its national health and wellbeing program in Australia to include cyber safety content with the support of Intel Security. The bCyberwise and It’s Your Call modules have reached 259,000 children since launching in 2013. ###  Kids Vs Parents cyber awareness gap 2015-01-20T01:19:02Z kids-vs-parents-cyber-awareness-gap With strong sales of Apple and Android devices* over Christmas, Intel Security is warning that this surge in household devices could also mean a heightened risk of security issues, as children bring their own devices into schools. The Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) trend could see devices such as personal iPads and laptops being used in the classroom more and more – so Intel Security Cybermum, Sydney based mum-of-four Alex Merton-McCann, is encouraging parents to take an active interest in their child’s online activities this year. With the recent Intel Security Tweens, Teens and Technology showing that 49% of children say their parents ‘can’t keep up with technology’ and a further 70% admitting that their parents ‘don't know the full extent of their online activity’, “now is the time for parents to get involved,” says Merton-McCann. “If there was ever a reason for parental involvement in their kids digital world, it’s BYOD,” continued Merton-McCann.   “BYOD means the school is no longer managing your child’s device and usage – it’s now you, the parent.  So, make sure you understand how the device works but far more importantly, understand how the Internet works.  Join the social networks your child uses, check out their favourite online games, start shopping and socialising online.  To be a good digital parent, you need to fully understand how the digital world works, so get started now,” said Merton-McCann. Intel Security and partner, Life Education, recently visited an Australian school to pit parents against kids in a test of cyber and social media awareness: http://intelsecurityapac.com/digitalsafety/2015/01/16/2015-back-to-school/  More highlights from the recent Teens, Tweens and Technology 2014 study from McAfee, part of Intel Security, which looked at the current habits of Australian teens and tweens (aged 8 – 17), highlighted further interesting information on the social culture of Australian youths: In 2014, YouTube replaced Skype as the number one social site across all age groups, with Facebook the most likely to be visited daily Facebook has seen a spike in underage users, with 31% of 8-9 year old and 60% of 10-12 year olds using the site despite the legal age being 13 (up from 26% in 2013) Nearly half (48%) have chatted online with or live tweeted someone they do not know (up from 19% in 2013) One in five (18%) has met someone in person that they first met online Online communication has developed a popularity contest: Over a quarter of teens and tweens (27%) feel more accepted on social media than in person and half (50%) feel more important and popular when they receive ‘likes’ on social posts A further 41% said that they wished that posts received more ‘likes’ The study also revealed alarming information about social media communication trends and behaviour: 81% of Australia’s youth have witnessed cyberbullying – up from 53% in 2013 Nearly half of teens and tweens (43%) are currently experiencing cyberbullying 15% admit to having bullied others online A further 70% have purposely taken actions to hide what they do online from their parents (including clearing browser history, deleting posts and creating dummy profiles) Taking an active role in providing cyber education to Australian children, Intel Security works in partnership with Life Education to include cyber content through its bCyberwise and It’s Your Call modules in Australian schools and to date has reached over 235,000 children since launching in 2013. Merton-McCann offers the following advice to parents when undertaking the BYOD scheme: Before you purchase make sure you understand whether there is a preferred platform in use at your child’s school e.g. Apple or Android.  Many schools will provide a list of recommended devices but if yours doesn’t, it’s best to ask before you spend on any technology Understand what support, if any, is offered by the school.  Do kids have to troubleshoot problems themselves?  If there is no support on offer, I highly recommend parents (or an older sibling) investing time in understanding how the device works Don’t buy a cellular device – a device that requires its own plan.  Not only are cellular plans expensive, it means your child will be able to access social media & other ‘taboo’ sites that most school networks will restrict Learn about and understand tethering – a process that allows you to use your smartphone as a modem so you can connect another device to the Internet.  If your kids have a smartphone with data they can do this in a matter of seconds.  While this is a super handy feature, it means they could run up large bills and also have an unlimited internet searching experience – so make sure you fully investigate the options Protection!  Always insure the device – no excuses.  It is also worth investing in comprehensive Internet security software.  McAfee’s LiveSafe will provide protection for all your devices (including mobile phones & tablets) from just $129.95 (www.livesafe.com) “When BYOD is done well, it can be empowering for both the student and the school.  The student (and their family) takes charge’ of the technology by choosing and managing a device that best suits their needs.  This allows the school to focus on what they do best – engaging our kids and preparing them for our 21st Century world,” added Merton-McCann. Alex Merton-McCann is available for interview – please let us know if you would be interested in speaking to her. CONTENT: To use the video online, please find a downloadable file here: http://intelsecurityapac.com/digitalsafety/wp-content/uploads/sites/40/2015/01/IntelSecurity-DSP-Back-To-School_Full.zip  Download an infographic about the Teens, Tweens and Technology research here: http://mcafeecybered.com/cybered/files/ISG_TweensTeensInfographic_2014.pdf  To find out more information on Intel Security, and how Intel Security Digital Safety works with Life Education, visit www.intelsecurity.com and www.intelsecurityapac.com/digitalsafety *Citi analyst Craig Woolford in an interview with ABC’s PM radio show January 7th 2015 http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2013/s3921772.htm INTEL SECURITY APPOINTS INDUSTRY LEADER TO HEAD UP ANZ CONSUMER OPERATIONS AND ANNOUNCES ADDITIONAL APPOINTMENTS 2014-12-17T23:36:27Z intel-security-appoints-industry-leader-to-head-up-anz-consumer-operations-and-announces-additional-appointments SYDNEY, Australia, 18 December 2014 ––McAfee, part of Intel Security,has today announced a host of new senior appointments across its ANZ Consumer business, including Matthew Drake to the role of ANZ Consumer Director, David Berthelsen as ANZ Business Development Manager and Paul Puech as Asia Pacific Online Sales Manager at Intel Security. The announcement comes as Intel Security continues to invest in its Asia Pacific Consumer operations, a process begun earlier in the year with the appointment of ex-Symantec Consumer Vice President, David Freer. Bringing with him an outstanding array of experience, Matthew Drake joins the North Sydney-based McAfee team, taking responsibility for all of Intel Security’s routes to market including OEM & ISP partnerships, retail and online operations. Over the past nine years, Matthew has led Symantec’s Australia & New Zealand Norton consumer business and has previously held global marketing roles in the US as well as North American consumer and channel marketing responsibilities. Throughout his career, he has won numerous awards including the CEOs Champion’s Circle, Worldwide Consumer Salesperson of the Year, Worldwide Consumer Sales Leader of the Year, and was recognised in 2014 with the ARN Community Channel Champion award. Matthew comments, “The past year has well and truly brought global digital security to the forefront of public concern.  McAfee is in a very strong position and I’m very much looking forward to building on this and driving further expansion across Australia and New Zealand.” David Berthelsen was the National Brands Manager for Oceania, leading major projects that developed brands and products for the app based ‘Connected Fitness’ market.  Prior to his most recent role, David was Country Manager for Symantec New Zealand’s Norton business and in addition had account responsibility for some of the largest retail accounts in Australia.  He will report into Matthew Drake. Paul Puech joins from international mobile gaming company Gameloft, where he held numerous senior roles including Country Director Australia and Acquisition Sales for APAC.  Prior to Gameloft, Paul worked across Brand and Product Manager positions at L’Oreal and Unilever. David Freer, Vice President, Consumer APACadded, “We are hugely excited to welcome Matthew, David and Paul to the Intel Security family.  All three bring such a broad range of refined experience to Intel Security’s consumer business and are the perfect fit as we continue to drive the Asia Pacific region forward.”  ### About Intel Security McAfee is now part of Intel Security.  With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique Global Threat Intelligence, Intel Security is intensely focused on developing proactive, proven security solutions and services that protect systems, networks, and mobile devices for business and personal use around the world.  Intel Security combines the experience and expertise of McAfee with the innovation and proven performance of Intel to make security an essential ingredient in every architecture and on every computing platform.  Intel Security’s mission is to give everyone the confidence to live and work safely and securely in the digital world.  www.intelsecurity.com   Note: McAfee is a trademark or registered trademark of McAfee, Inc. in the United States and other countries.  Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.     “12 SCAMS OF CHRISTMAS” LIST EDUCATES SHOPPERS ON HOW TO AVOID UNWRAPPING AN ONLINE THREAT AND KEEP THEIR DIGITAL LIVES SAFE 2014-11-12T01:02:29Z 12-scams-of-christmas-list-educates-shoppers-on-how-to-avoid-unwrapping-an-online-threat-and-keep-their-digital-lives-safe McAfee, part of Intel Security, has announced its annual “12 Scams of Christmas” list to educate the public on the most popular ways cybercriminals scam consumers during the festive season as they surf their digital devices. Cyber scrooges leverage all types of digital devices, social media platforms and mobile apps to take advantage of consumers’ distraction during this festive and busy time of year. With Australia’s $265 billion retail sector aiming for a six per cent growth around the Christmas period this year*, the role of online shopping and the need for security measures to protect consumers has never been stronger. 83 per cent of Australian retailers are predicting higher online sales than last Christmas**, and latest industry analysis also shows that online shopping across the country is up 12.8 per cent from the previous year to date***. “More and more, consumers are using their devices to seek out the best bargains online in a bid to make the Christmas shopping process as painless as possible. In doing so they need to be aware of the ways that criminals are looking to exploit them,” said Mike Sentonas, VP and CTO - Security Connected, McAfee, part of Intel Security. “Understanding what to watch out for and how to properly secure their devices gives consumers the information they need to protect their digital lives and personal information.” To help educate and protect consumers and businesses this holiday season, McAfee has identified this year’s top “12 Scams of Christmas”: 1. You’ve Got Mail! — As Christmas retail sales continue to migrate online, the risk for shipping notification and phishing scams are increasing. Though malware is a year-round risk, since many people do their Christmas shopping online, consumers are more apt to click on a shipping notification or phishing e-mail because they think it is legit.  2. Deceptive Advertising — Everyone is searching for steals and deals during the Christmas break. Keep your eyes peeled (and your wallet in check) when online shopping for this season’s most coveted products. Dangerous links, phony contests on social media, and bogus gift cards are just some of the ways scammers try to steal your personal information and ruin your holiday cheer. 3. Chilling Charities — ‘Tis the season for giving. During the holidays, many consumers give back by donating to their favorite charity. Sadly, no good deed goes unpunished. Be wary of fake charities that could reach you via email, or are shared virally through social media.  4. Buyer Beware — There are just some scams that you can’t help but fall victim to, unfortunately. Point of sale malware that leads to exposing credit card information falls into this category. Make sure you check your credit card statements vigilantly and stay on top of breaking news to be aware and prepared.  5. iScams — New mobile apps for Android and iOS devices are added every day. Thanks to the ongoing advancement of technology, your mobile device can control the temperature in your house, keep you connected to social media and add cool filters to your holiday photos. Even the most official-looking or festive apps could be malicious and access your personal information.  6. Getting Carded — Digital e-cards to spread the holiday cheer are fun, easy and most importantly, thoughtful. While you may want a loved one to send you “Season’s Greetings,” hackers are looking to wish you a “Merry Malware!” Well-known e-card sites are safe, but be wary of potential scams that cause you to download malware onto your device.  7. Christmas Travel Scams — With travel on the rise during the peak of the festive season, online scammers are ready to take advantage of the fact that consumers often become less vigilant about their safety. Fake online travel deal links are bountiful, but there are also risks that exist once you arrive at your destination including spyware that can access your information through logging onto infected PCs onsite.  8. Bank Robocall Scam — When holiday spending increases and consumers are aware of the abuse to their bank accounts and credit cards, hackers use this as an opportunity. In most cases, consumers receive a fake phone call from one of these institutions from an automated (or not) “security agent” stating that the user’s account has been compromised and requesting personal information including the account password, to make changes.  9. ATM Skimming — During the holiday season, you need cash and are usually in a rush to get it. Criminals can access your information at ATMs by installing skimming devices to steal the data off your card’s magnetic strip and either using a video camera or keypad overlay to capture your PIN. A simple solution is to look carefully at your ATM for anything suspicious and cover the keypad when entering your PIN.  10. ‘Year in Review’ Traps — Many news services capitalise on the holidays by developing ‘Year in Review’ articles. Companies should warn their employees about the risks of clicking on these types of links from their work emails, and consumers should be wary too. Links from phony sources could infect and compromise the security of company devices. 11. BYO...Device — With an increase in travel, activity (and bubbly!) over the busy Christmas period, people are more likely to forget their smart phones in public places. While inconvenient for them, it is also way for hackers to access sensitive personal information and business data if the appropriate security measures are not in place. 12. Bad USB Blues — During the holiday season, you may see an increase in gift baskets from vendors who want to continue doing business with your company in the upcoming year. One of the most popular items in these baskets includes branded USBs. Beware of allowing your employees to use these, as undetectable malware is sometimes pre-installed on them. To stay protected and ensure a happy and safe festive season, McAfee has shared these safety tips: Do Your Research Whether online shopping, donating to charities, or tracking your gifts, do your research to make sure the company you are working with is legitimate. - Do an online search of the company you’re buying items from to see if there’s any news about recent risks  - Go to the company’s homepage to make sure it is a genuine business  - Instead of clicking on a link in an email for a shopping deal, visit the site directly 
 Analyse Apps  
Before downloading a new app, review it to make sure you know exactly what you’re putting on your smartphone.  - Only download apps from an official app store and not a third party  - If the app requests too many permissions, do not download it. It may be requesting access to information on your phone that you would prefer to keep private, and certainly more information than it needs  - Use antivirus software Bank Carefully 
 People are spending more money during the holidays than they do all year. Cyber criminals may try and use this fact to more easily scam consumers.  - If your bank calls requesting information, hang up and call them back through the official main phone number. It’s important to talk to your banker through the official number so you know it is legitimate  - When withdrawing money, be aware of your surroundings. Check to make sure that you are in a safe place to enter your information. If anything looks amiss, leave  - Inspect the ATM for loose wires or machine parts that may have been tampered with. This could indicate hackers trying to fix the machine for their benefit 
 Stay Informed 
 Holiday season or not, cyber scams and identity theft happen very frequently throughout the year. Now that the shopping season has begun and the danger is heightened, it is important to constantly be aware of new cyber-attacks or threats in the marketplace.  - Follow breaking news stories for new security breaches to stay alert and be on top of your game  - Only shop for holiday gifts at retailers you know have not been compromised  - Check your credit card statements often to make sure that you were not affected  
Educate Your Employees 
 You’ll want to make sure that your employees know how to protect themselves, and their devices with your sensitive company information – at all times, but especially during this hectic holiday travel and shopping season when devices are more likely to get misplaced and people let their guard down.  - Ensure devices are secured with complex passcodes to allow access to smartphones, tablets or laptops  - Share the most common scams that exist around the holidays with your employees so they know what to be on the lookout for and how to stay protected 
 If you do plan to search for deals online, use apps or open shopping related emails, make sure your entire household’s devices have protection, such as the McAfee LiveSafeTM service, which protects all your PCs, Macs, tablets and smartphones. The McAfee LiveSafe service also includes the McAfee® Mobile Security app, which protects your smartphone or tablet from all types of malware. The app guards you from the latest mobile threats by offering enhanced privacy and backup features, location tracking, and McAfee® SiteAdvisor® technology to help you steer clear of dangers when searching on a mobile device.  Additional Resources * http://www.retail.org.au/ArticleDetails/tabid/232/ArticleID/716/ABS-September-2014-retail-trade-figures- released-TODAY-1-2-percent-increase-%E2%80%93-retailers-hopeful-Christmas-trade-can-achieve-6-percent- year-on-year-growth.aspx
 ** http://www2.deloitte.com/au/en/pages/consumer-business/articles/the-deloitte-retail-review.html *** http://business.nab.com.au/online-retail-sales-index-monthly-update-september-2014-8541/ For more information on McAfee’s “12 Scams of Christmas” list and tips on how to stay safe while using digital devices, please visit the: - Webpage: www.mcafee.com/12scams - Gary Davis’ thoughts on the latest scams: http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/12-scams-of-holidays-2014  - Robert Siciliano’s blog post and infographic: http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/12-scams-2014  - To join the conversation during the holidays, use hashtag #12Scams at www.facebook.com/IntelSecurity and follow @McAfeeConsumer  ###  
About Intel Security 
McAfee is now part of Intel Security. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique Global Threat Intelligence, Intel Security is intensely focused on developing proactive, proven security solutions and services that protect systems, networks, and mobile devices for business and personal use around the world. Intel Security combines the experience and expertise of McAfee with the innovation and proven performance of Intel to make security an essential ingredient in every architecture and on every computing platform. Intel Security’s mission is to give everyone the confidence to live and work safely and securely in the digital world. www.intelsecurity.com  
Note: McAfee is a trademark or registered trademark of McAfee, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.  McAfee Improves Security for Android Embedded Systems 2013-03-12T03:14:00Z mcafee-improves-security-for-android-embedded-systems SANTA CLARA, Calif.—March 11, 2013 – McAfee today announced that it has delivered the industry’s first ever whitelisting security solution for Android based embedded systems. McAfee Application Control for Android is the only security solution that resides in the Android kernel, embedded in the operating system. McAfee provides protection from the installation or execution of a malicious application on an Android-based device. McAfee also provides protection at the application layer to Android devices. Android is quickly becoming a favourite platform for embedded engineers. According to a UBM Electronics’ 2012 Embedded Market Study, 13 per cent of the surveyed embedded engineers reported using Android in a 2012 project and 34 per cent reported that they are considering working with Android in 2013. With Android’s success in expanded markets, the operating system is drawing the attention of new attacks. “McAfee is the only security technology provider that provides enforceable security by residing in the Android kernel space. As Android kernel has been adopted on core Linux platform, it was a natural ground for us to extend our whitelisting solution capabilities to Android,” said Rishi Bhargava vice president of product management, Embedded Security at McAfee. “As Android continues to grow in its adoption, McAfee is committed to making this platform as secure and trusted as other common embedded developer platforms.” The McAfee Embedded Control solution provides tamper proof protection, superior operational control of devices in the field and ease of management with Android devices. Previously, embedded engineers had only a single operating system option –Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux)– if they wanted to have enforceable security capabilities for their embedded system. “There was already growing interest in Android in embedded systems. With McAfee extending its security to Android, this will only enhance the operating system for new product designs,” said Hiroshi Komura, Associate Senior Vice President at NEC Infrontia Corporation. “NEC Infrontia is expanding its use of the Android platform in order to offer a wide range of technology choices to its customers.” Prior to McAfee Embedded Control, Android security applications only operated at the user level, leaving devices vulnerable to system-level attacks. McAfee removes this security gap with a kernel residing security solution to improve security for the entire Android stack. McAfee Embedded Control blocks unauthorised applications and changes on fixed-function, point-of-service infrastructures, including retail devices, medical devices, industrial control systems, office equipment, gaming devices, automotive, and various military and aerospace devices. Availability For more information on McAfee Embedded Control visit; http://www.mcafee.com/us/products/embedded-control.aspx About McAfee McAfee, a wholly owned subsidiary of Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC), empowers businesses, the public sector, and home users to safely experience the benefits of the Internet. The company delivers proactive and proven security solutions and services for systems, networks, and mobile devices around the world. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique Global Threat Intelligence network, McAfee is relentlessly focused on keeping its customers safe. au.mcafee.com ### Note: McAfee is a trademark or registered trademark of McAfee, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. Media Contact: Sabine Leroy Spectrum Communications +61 2 9469 5700 mcafee@spectrumcomms.com.au McAfee Sets A New Standard For Comprehensive Malware Protection 2013-02-26T06:29:00Z mcafee-sets-a-new-standard-for-comprehensive-malware-protection RSA CONFERENCE, SAN FRANCISCO - February 26, 2013 – McAfee today announced that is has acquired the ValidEdge sandboxing technology that identifies sophisticated, hard-to-detect malware, to broaden its anti-malware portfolio and further strengthen the McAfee Security Connected approach. McAfee also announced more than 30 malware-focused product enhancements that will extend the company’s lead in comprehensive malware protection. The acquired technology provides advanced threat detection by running suspected malware in a “sandbox” and learning what impact a suspected malware sample will have on an endpoint. This new technology further strengthens McAfee’s current anti-malware offerings that have been proven as best in class at identifying day zero attacks. Unlike other sandboxing solutions, this new technology, when integrated with McAfee’s other network and endpoint anti-malware products, will automatically block future attacks by convicted malware samples. It will also provide signature information so that already infected endpoints can be remediated automatically by McAfee ePolicy Orchestrator (McAfee ePO). McAfee plans to deliver the first product that integrates the new sandboxing technology in the second half of 2013. A single point product cannot deliver comprehensive malware protection. The only way to effectively combat the onslaught of malware threats now numbering close to 100,000 per dayi is through an integrated, end-to-end, holistically-managed approach to security. To support that comprehensive approach, McAfee has made over 30 significant anti malware product enhancements including the following: McAfee Network Security Platform - Adds new “signature-less” threat detection and prevention technologies, strong botnet prevention, deep file analysis, and a powerful anti-malware engine capable of detecting advanced malware across a full range of protocols and file types. It also adds intelligent alert prioritisation to automatically prioritise network events and improve integration with McAfee ePO and McAfee Enterprise Security Manager, making use of real-time information so operators have the full context of an attack, at the precise time of the attack. McAfee Web Protection - Now expands emulation capabilities to identify advanced malware that dynamically changes in the browser in an attempt to avoid detection. It also adds a new outbound detection technique that reveals bot infections attempting to receive additional malicious code. Expanded reporting capabilities include actionable reporting to help reduce attack vulnerability by simplifying the blacklisting process across McAfee ePO-connected products.McAfee Email Protection - Can be deployed on-premise, in the cloud, and now as an integrated combination of both with a single pane of glass architecture, reducing cost and increasing efficiency while blocking malware away from the network. Also adds graymail filtering to improve employee productivity. McAfee Enterprise Security Manager – Active integration with ePolicy Orchestrator, Network Security Platform and McAfee Vulnerability Manager automates quarantine, scan, and policy command execution – turning actionable intelligence into intelligent action. McAfee Real Time for ePO – Announced earlier this month, this new product enables security decisions based on “what is” versus “what was” by querying and identifying every compromised endpoint in an organisation in seconds in order to remediate those endpoints. It dramatically increases situational awareness and reduces exposure, risk, and cost of security. McAfee Deep Defender – Provides protection against master boot record (MBR) rootkits. Any driver attempting to write or read a MBR is now monitored through Deep Defender, which operates beyond the OS and is enabled by hardware-enhanced security with Intel. It prevents MBR rootkits from modifying the MBR in real-time. “According to our research, 59% of enterprise security professionals believe that they have been targeted by an advanced persistent threat,” said Tony Prigmore, senior analyst, Enterprise Strategy Group. “An integrated approach that includes network, endpoint, threat intelligence, and other security aspects is needed to help thwart advanced threats.” McAfee’s comprehensive malware protection is based on the McAfee Security Connected platform, which helps customers improve security posture, optimise security for greater cost effectiveness, and align security strategically with business initiatives. McAfee is taking an orchestrated approach to protect against malware by intelligently applying the best technologies at the right time and in the right place to thoroughly analyse and respond to suspicious files, web sites, email messages, and networks. Best-of-breed approaches and competitive solutions either create security loopholes or cause unnecessary business delays. “McAfee has been investing in technology to help our customers protect against malware for 20 years,” said Pat Calhoun, senior vice president and general manager of network security at McAfee. “We are now extending our lead in malware protection by continuing to invest in new products and product enhancements. Point products can’t provide adequate protection against these advanced attacks, which is why McAfee is delivering an integrated, multi layered, managed solution that provides comprehensive malware protection across endpoints and networks.” For more information visit www.mcafee.com/cmp. About McAfee McAfee, a wholly owned subsidiary of Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC), empowers businesses, the public sector, and home users to safely experience the benefits of the Internet. The company delivers proactive and proven security solutions and services for systems, networks, and mobile devices around the world. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique Global Threat Intelligence network, McAfee is relentlessly focused on keeping its customers safe. au.mcafee.com ### Note: McAfee is a trademark or registered trademark of McAfee, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. The information contained in this document is for informational purposes only and should not be deemed an offer by McAfee or create an obligation on McAfee. McAfee reserves the right to discontinue products at any time, add or subtract features or functionality, or modify its products, at its sole discretion, without notice and without incurring further obligations. i McAfee Labs, Q4 2012 Threat Report McAfee Report Sees Malware Repurposed To Strike Various Economic Sectors 2013-02-22T02:21:00Z mcafee-report-sees-malware-repurposed-to-strike-various-economic-sectors SANTA CLARA, Calif. – Feb. 21 2013 – McAfee today released the McAfee Threats Report: Fourth Quarter 2012, (report ) in which McAfee Labs revealed that sophisticated attacks originally targeting the financial services industry are now increasingly directed at other critical sectors of the economy, while an emerging set of new tactics and technologies are being implemented to evade industry-standard security measures. The report showed the continued proliferation of password-stealing trojans and advanced persistent threats (APTs) such as Operation High Roller and Project Bliztkrieg, and the expansion of their attacks to government, manufacturing and commercial transaction infrastructure targets. “We are seeing attacks shifting into a variety of new areas, from factories, to corporations, to government agencies, to the infrastructure that connects them together,” said Vincent Weafer, senior vice president of McAfee Labs. “This represents a new chapter in cybersecurity in that threat-development, driven by the lure of financial industry profits, has created a growing underground market for these cybercrime weapons, as well as creative new approaches to thwarting security measures common across industries.” Leveraging data from McAfee’s Global Threat Intelligence (GTI) network, the McAfee Labs team of 500 multidisciplinary researchers in 30 countries follows the complete range of threats in real time, identifying application vulnerabilities, analysing and correlating risks, and enabling instant remediation to protect enterprises and the public. In Q4 2012, McAfee Labs identified the following trends: More Threats, More Availability, More Industries Targeted As a group, unique password-stealing trojans grew 72 per cent in Q4 as cybercriminals realised that user authentication credentials constitute some of the most valuable intellectual property stored on most computers. Now widely available, these trojans are increasingly appearing within customised threats or combined with other “off-the-shelf” threats available on the internet. Fourth quarter revelations around the Citadel trojan suggest that this trojan’s information theft capabilities are being deployed beyond the financial services sector. Web Threats Shift from Botnets to URLs McAfee continued to see suspicious URLs replacing botnets as the primary distribution mechanism for malware. An analysis of web threats found that the number of new suspicious URLs increased by 70 per cent in Q4. New suspect URLs averaged 4.6 million per month, almost doubling the previous 2.7 million per month figure from the last two quarters. Ninety-five per cent of these URLs were found to be hosting malware, exploits or code designed specifically to compromise computers. The decline in the number of infected systems controlled by botnet operators is driven in part by law enforcement efforts to bring botnets down, but perhaps more so by the declining appeal of the botnet business model. Increase in Infections beneath the OS The volume of Master Boot Record-related malware climbed 27 per cent to reach an all-time quarterly high. These threats embed themselves deep within the PC system storage stack, where standard antivirus solutions cannot detect them. Once embedded, they can steal user information, download other malicious software, or leverage the infected PC’s computing power to launch attacks against other PCs or networks. While these MBR attacks represent a relatively small portion of the overall PC malware landscape, McAfee Labs expects them to become a primary attack vector in 2013. Malicious Signed Binaries Circumvent System Security The number of electronically-signed malware samples doubled over the course of Q4. This clearly indicates that cybercriminals have decided that signing malware binaries is one of the best ways to circumvent standard system security measures. Mobile Malware Continues to Increase and Evolve The number of mobile malware samples discovered by McAfee Labs in 2012 was 44 times the number found in 2011, meaning 95 per cent of all mobile malware samples appeared in the last year alone. Cybercriminals are now dedicating the majority of their efforts to attacking the mobile Android platform, with an 85 per cent jump of new Android-based malware samples in Q4 alone. The motivation for deploying mobile threats is rooted in the inherent value of the information found on mobile devices, including passwords and address books, as well as new “business” opportunities that are not available on the PC platform. These opportunities include Trojans that send SMS messages to premium services, then charge the user for each message sent. More information on mobile-specific malware can also be found in the recently-released 2012 Consumer Mobile Trends Report: http://www.mcafee.com/us/resources/reports/rp-mobile-security-consumer-trends.pdf To learn more about malicious activity and the most recent threat findings in the full copy of the McAfee Threats Report, Fourth Quarter 2012, please visit: http://www.mcafee.com/us/resources/reports/rp-quarterly-threat-q4-2012.pdf About McAfee McAfee, a wholly owned subsidiary of Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC), empowers businesses, the public sector, and home users to safely experience the benefits of the Internet. The company delivers proactive and proven security solutions and services for systems, networks, and mobile devices around the world. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique Global Threat Intelligence network, McAfee is relentlessly focused on keeping its customers safe au.mcafee.com. Note: McAfee is a trademark or registered trademark of McAfee, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. ### Media Contact: Sabine Leroy Spectrum Communications +61 2 9469 5700 mcafee@spectrumcomms.com.au McAfee Mobile Study Documents Sophistication and Ubiquity of Risky Apps 2013-02-19T23:56:00Z mcafee-mobile-study-documents-sophistication-and-ubiquity-of-risky-apps SANTA CLARA, Calif. – February 19, 2013 – McAfee today released the results of its Mobile Security: McAfee Consumer Trends Report, documenting sophisticated and complex risky apps containing multi-faceted scams, black market crimes, drive-by downloads and near-field communication threats. The report identifies a new wave of techniques hackers use to steal digital identities, commit financial fraud, and invade users’ privacy on mobile devices. Mobile platforms have become increasingly attractive to cybercriminals as consumers live more of their digital lives on smartphones and tablets. According to IDC, mobile devices are surpassing PCs as the preferred way to access the Internet and the number of people using PCs to go online will shrink by 15 million over the next four years, while the number of mobile users will increase by 91 million.1 With the mobile space becoming a more enticing platform for online mischief, the complexity and volume of threats targeting consumers will continue to increase. Using its extensive global threat intelligence network (GTI), McAfee Labs analysed mobile security data from the last three quarters. “Despite elevated consumer awareness of threats on mobile platforms, there is still a significant knowledge gap surrounding how and when devices become infected and the level of potential damage,” said Luis Blando, vice president of mobile product development at McAfee. “Cybercriminals are exhibiting greater levels of determination and sophistication leading to more destructive, multi-faceted hacks that are harder to spot, and thus warrant a greater degree of security and vigilance. Our goal in releasing this report is to help consumers understand the risks they face and learn ways they can stay safe and compute with confidence on all of their devices.” In the report, McAfee Labs identifies the following threats as the most severe existing and new trends consumers will encounter in 2013: Risky Apps: Cybercriminals are going to great lengths to insert infected apps into trusted sources such as Google Play and the risks within each app are becoming more intricate. As a matter of fact, McAfee Labs found that 75 per cent of the malware-infected apps downloaded by McAfee Mobile Security users, who are apt to be more security conscious than the average consumer, were housed in the Google Play store, and that the average consumer has a one in six chance of downloading a risky app. Nearly 25 per cent of the risky apps that contain malware also contain suspicious URLs, and 40 per cent of malware families misbehave in more than one way. A risky app may allow someone to: > Steal personal information such as banking, email or wireless account details and combine that with location data to put together a complete picture of who you are > Perpetuate fraud such as an SMS scam that will charge you without your approval > Abuse a device by making it part of a criminal bot network, which allows someone to remotely control your phone Black Market Activity: Botnet clients, downloaders, and rootkits are generic, useful software sold on black markets as part of software toolkits. Criminals use these to commit premium SMS and click fraud, spam distribution, data theft, or bank fraud – and the complexity of these criminal activities is growing. Commercial criminals are now reusing and recombining these components to devise new, profitable schemes. Drive-by Downloads: The first mobile drive-by downloads were seen in 2012 and we expect these to increase in 2013. On a mobile device, a drive-by download fools a user into downloading an app without knowing it. Once a user opens the app, criminals have access to the device. Near Field Communication: In 2013, we expect to see criminals abuse the tap-and-pay near field communications (NFC) technology used in mobile payment programs, or “digital wallets.” This scam uses worms that propagate through proximity, a process we can call “bump and infect.” The distribution path can quickly spread malware through a group of people such as in a passenger-loaded train or at an amusement park. When the newly infected device is used to “tap and pay” for the next purchase, the scammer collects the details of the wallet account and secretly reuses these credentials to steal from the wallet. Worm malware like this will spread by exploiting vulnerabilities on devices. This development would monetise the 11.8 per cent of malware families that already contain exploit behaviours. As the mobile space evolves, criminals will look at ways to generate revenue from features only mobile devices have. During 2012, about 16 per cent of malware families detected by McAfee attempted to get devices to subscribe to premium SMS messages. In 2013, we foresee an increase in threats that will have users finding out they bought premium apps only when they check their bills. For a full copy of the Mobile Security: McAfee Consumer Trends Report from McAfee Labs, with additional threats, please visit: http://www.mcafee.com/us/resources/reports/rp-mobile-security-consumer-trends.pdf Additionally, for tips on how to stay safe from mobile threats, visit: http://home.mcafee.com/advicecenter/?id=ad_ms 1 IDC Predictions 2013: Competing on the 3rd Platform, doc #238044, November 2012 About McAfee McAfee, a wholly owned subsidiary of Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC), empowers businesses, the public sector, and home users to safely experience the benefits of the Internet. The company delivers proactive and proven security solutions and services for systems, networks, and mobile devices around the world. With its Security Connected strategy, innovative approach to hardware-enhanced security, and unique Global Threat Intelligence network, McAfee is relentlessly focused on keeping its customers safe. au.mcafee.com ### Note: McAfee is a trademark or registered trademark of McAfee, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. Media Contact: Sabine Leroy Spectrum Communications +61 2 9469 5700 mcafee@spectrumcomms.com.au