The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2014-09-08T02:09:09Z Petrol retailers bring competition to Surfers Paradise 2014-09-08T02:09:09Z petrol-retailers-bring-competition-to-surfers-paradise-1 Media are invited to attend for reporting purposes.When:                 Wednesday 10 September 2014Where:                Marriott Resort & Spa, Surfers ParadiseTime:                   8:30am, Business Insight Breakfast PresentationSubject:              The Australian Government’s Competition ReviewSpokesperson:  Keynote Presentation, Professor Ian Harper, Chair Competition Review Panel.                             Association Spokesperson, Nic Moulis, CEO ACAPMA,  ISSUED BY / CONTACT DETAILS:               Nic Moulis, CEO ACAPMA                                                                         M: 0419747071                                                                         E: nicm@acapma.com.au            BACKGROUND:The Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA) is the leading association and national peak body responsible for the development and growth of the petroleum distribution and petrol convenience retail industries. ACAPMA members include over 90 per cent of the 120 businesses that operate in petroleum distribution and storage, while representing - through direct ownership, operation or supply - over 3500 service stations. ACAPMA’s membership profile in the main is independent small-to-medium businesses operating in regional and rural Australia. ACAPMA's Independent petrol convenience retailers and petroleum wholesalers will be converging on Surfers Paradise for the ACAPMA National Conference and Expo 2014 being held 9 – 12 September 2014.   ACT Food Safety Regulation means more red tape for business 2013-08-11T00:00:00Z act-food-safety-regulation-means-more-red-tape-for-business Media release 11 August 2013 ACT Food Safety Regulation means more red tape for businessThe Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA) calls on the Legislative Assembly to review the changes to food safety rules that will impose additional compliance and costs not required by all operators.Advocating for the 72 petrol convenience operators in the ACT that will be affected by the regulation, ACAPMA CEO Nic Moulis, said there was already a strong compliance system through the Food Safety Code that underpins legislation nationally.“A review of food safety in jurisdictions across Australia highlight that a notable exception is the operation of food safety legislation and regulation in the ACT,” said Mr Moulis. “While Government’s across the country are reducing the extent regulations impact businesses, the 72 operators of petrol convenience stores in the ACT will deal with tighter red tape compared to their 6,000 counterparts throughout Australia. “In our latest correspondence with Members’ of the Assembly, we have put the case that the Food Safety Act 2001 (ACT) be harmonised with the national norms in implementation.” While the ACT legislation utilises a risk based approach the criteria applied is not the level of interaction with or preparation of the foods, rather it is the potential for microbial growth. Under the new regime, to take effect on 1 September this year, all businesses that sell pre-packaged products are deemed to be selling "Potentially Hazardous Foods". All such businesses must initially register as a Food Business, must have at least one formally qualified Food Safety Supervisor per site, must have formally documented food handling processes and must provide training for all staff handling food. “The financial and logistical issues of appointing and training a Food Safety Supervisor in businesses, which usually only have a single staff person onsite and serve only pre-packaged foods, is a significant burden,” explained Mr Moulis. “We suggest that the erroneous and expensive step of having a Food Safety Supervisor be removed in businesses that serve only pre-packaged foods, in favour of the pre-existing requirement to have a documented process for temperature checking and general food handling. “A concession of this nature will allow the resources of inspectors and food safety training professionals to focus on ‘raw to plate’ food businesses that, due to the nature of their food handling, pose a greater risk to the public safety.” ENDS For all media enquiries, please contact ACAPMA’s CEO, Nic Moulis, by calling 0419 747 071 or via email nicm@acapma.com.auACAPMA logos can be made available for use with this media release only. Additional information Background: The Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA) is a not‐for‐profit employer organisation that has represented the interests of businesses in the petroleum distribution and petrol convenience industries for over 38 years. As the leading association and national peak body responsible for the development and growth of the petroleum distribution and petrol convenience retail industries, ACAPMA members include over 90 percent of the 120 businesses that operate in petroleum distribution and storage, while representing ‐ through direct ownership, operation or supply – over 3,500 service stations. ACAPMA’s membership profile in the main is independent small‐to‐medium businesses operating in metropolitan aswell as regional and rural Australia. Independent fuel welcomes Sims petrol appointment 2013-07-26T02:52:00Z independent-fuel-welcomes-sims-petrol-appointment Media release 26 July 2013 Independent fuel welcomes Sims petrol appointmentThe fuel industry association representing independent service stations looks forward to working with ACCC Chairman Rod Sims to improve the competitive nature of the industry.The Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA) Chief Executive Officer Nic Moulis says that the appointment of Mr Sims to the petrol monitoring role provides the opportunity for renewed focus on industry competition.“Under the stewardship of Commissioner Dimasi we have seen many of the petrol myths and confusions held by the wider community addressed and I thank him for his efforts in facilitating this positive advancement in understanding the fuel industry,” said Mr Moulis.“There are still structural competition issues the ACCC need to address and the opportunity of the Chairman dealing directly with these should not be downplayed.“Mr Sims comments in the past, which emphasised that some forms of conduct are so detrimental to the competitive process that the ACCC will always assess them as a priority, has me optimistic that he will address the misuse of market power by major retailers.“Many independent petrol convenience operators struggle to compete against major companies with substantial market share. “The continued use of discounts, which sell petrol below cost for weeks on end, and the cross subsidy of profits between supermarket, liquor and hardware to support shopper dockets has had a damaging anti-competitive effect on the fuel industry. “Over the last four years we have seen close to 1,000 independent service stations close their doors. “The continued loss of small to medium independents from the fuel industry will eventually leave it in the hands of a few multinationals. This is not to the benefit of motorists in the long-term.“While there are always high public expectations surrounding the price of petrol, in order to truly address this the ACCC must focus on its ability to prosecute damaging competitive behaviour.”ENDSFor all media enquiries, please contact ACAPMA’s CEO, Nic Moulis, by calling 0419 747 071 or via email nicm@acapma.com.auACAPMA logos can be made available for use with this media release only.Additional informationBackground:The Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA) is a not-for-profit employer organisation that has represented the interests of businesses in the petroleum distribution and petrol convenience industries for over 38 years. As the leading association and national peak body responsible for the development and growth of the petroleum distribution and petrol convenience retail industries, ACAPMA members include over 90 percent of the 120 businesses that operate in petroleum distribution and storage, while representing - through direct ownership, operation or supply – over 3,500 service stations. ACAPMA’s membership profile in the main is independent small-to-medium businesses operating in metropolitan as well as regional and rural Australia. Convenience stores left to go stale in bread barney 2013-06-13T03:19:00Z convenience-stores-left-to-go-stale-in-bread-barney Media release 13 June 2013 Convenience stores left to go stale in bread barneySupermarket conduct, with discount bread and alleged misleading of consumers, is damaging smaller convenience operators. With changes by bread manufacturers to trading terms and supply arrangements, it is estimated one in five independent convenience stores has stopped selling bread.According to the Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA), which represents petrol convenience operators, deliveries to convenience operators have become uneconomical as a result of the trading terms and conditions major supermarkets’ have placed on the bread supply companies.“As a consequence of the price and supply chain pressure major retailers have placed on bread manufacturers, it was only a matter of time before smaller independent stores became collateral damage in this bun fight,” said ACAPMA CEO, Mr Nic Moulis.“Convenience store owners, especially in regional Australia, no longer get fresh daily deliveries, are no longer able to return unsold products and in many cases no longer sell bread at all.“We are continually being told that supermarkets selling bread at a lower price is not for an anti-competitive purpose. The terms and supply conditions placed on manufacturers by major retailers have had an adverse reaction that has rolled through to others.“I can assure you this has had an anti-competitive effect.”If the Coalition wins the September Federal Election ACAPMA is hopeful that the promised ‘Root and Branch’ review of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (the Act) occurs within the first 100 days. The Association believes that the review’s Terms of Reference will need to include an investigation of all provisions under section 46, Misuse of Market Power, within the Act, to address this kind of flow on affect giant clients, like supermarkets, can create in an industry.“The Coalition’s root and branch review of competition policy cannot come soon enough,” said Mr Moulis.“The terms of reference need to include a long hard look at section 46 of the Competition and Consumer Act.“Current interpretation of the below cost selling and anti-competitive purpose provisions in this section of the Act deny small business the opportunity to have the ACCC effectively take action.“The result is that situations such as this reward major businesses in the short term only to the determent of competition and the consumer in the long term. It is my belief that this same apprehension is not only held by independent retailers.“Independent convenience store operators used to live off bread and milk. Now they are starving to sell either product.”ENDSFor all media enquiries, please contact Nic Moulis, ACAPMA CEO, on 0419 747 071 or nicm@acapma.com.auACAPMA logos can be made available for use with this media release only.Additional informationBackground:The Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA) is a not-for-profit employer organisation that has represented the interests of businesses in the petroleum distribution and petrol convenience industries for over 38 years. As the leading association and national peak body responsible for the development and growth of the petroleum distribution and petrol convenience retail industries, ACAPMA members include over 90 percent of the 120 businesses that operate in petroleum distribution and storage, while representing - through direct ownership, operation or supply – over 3,500 service stations. ACAPMA’s membership profile in the main is independent small-to-medium businesses operating in metropolitan as well as regional and rural Australia. Use refinery closures to increase supply competition 2012-07-26T04:56:00Z use-refinery-closures-to-increase-supply-competition Independent small-to-medium operators in the Australian fuel industry consider the announcement by Caltex to close the Kurnell Refinery was inevitable and should be the catalyst to increase competition in the supply of fuel.The Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association (ACAPMA), which represents petroleum distributors and petrol convenience retailers, says that Australia should adopt a structure more like the current Australasian region’s wholesale fuel market, were terminals filled by reliable shipping with fuel imported from large regional refineries are being accessed by independent wholesalers, as it is proving to be more competitive than the historic Australian model of small refineries in capital cities owned by major oil companies. “For many years we have flagged that refineries in Australia were under economic pressure, so the announcement by Caltex to close Kurnell comes as no surprise to the Association,” said Nic Moulis, ACAPMA General Manager.“Small refineries operated by the four major oil companies have dominated supply since the 1920’s, leaving limited scope for independents to develop. The closure of these refineries provides a welcome opportunity to address infrastructure and competition failures that have existed for some time in the wholesale supply of fuel in Australia.”ACAPMA suggest that the opportunity for access to terminals already in Australia, as well as the building of more independent terminals is required as a first step to facilitate change. The Association believe these actions will pave the way for increased competition in the fuel market as businesses, outside the four major oil companies, will consider importing fuel into Australia. “Importation of fuel creates no supply or price threat to the fuel industry, as our economy has been a net importer of refined fuels for some time now and current pricing is based on international benchmarks,” said Mr Moulis. “Where limited terminal infrastructure is currently available we have seen the first tentative steps by independents to import and wholesale fuel. The more this can be encouraged the greater the positive affect will be on competition, which can only be of benefit the Australian economy.“Open access to the terminals that are to be built on the refinery sites along with the chance to develop further independent facilities should be addressed. If we were to act on this it would increase the ability for independents to grow, creating a competitive structure that would benefit all fuel users.”EndsFor all media enquiries, please contact ACAPMA’s General Manager, Nic Moulis by calling 0419 747 071 or via email nicm@acapma.com.au