The PRWIRE Press Releases https:// 2014-01-08T04:54:21Z No surprise that potential investors see upside in Australian fuel distribution assets 2014-01-08T04:54:21Z no-surprise-that-potential-investors-see-upside-in-australian-fuel-distribution-assets Sydney, 8 January 2014 - Logistics management software company ORTEC is not surprised that private equity companies such as TPG are keen to acquire Shell’s (and others’) fuel distribution assets in Australia.  According to Alan Thomas, Joint Managing Director of ORTEC Australia-New Zealand, “Australian management practices lag well behind best practices used overseas and consequently there is significant scope for improving returns.”   In many companies, fuel distribution operations report to the company’s marketing division. With management focusing more on traditional marketing activities such as branding and promotions, the consequence is that little attention is spent on logistics, the area that represents the majority of the assets and costs for fuel distribution.  As a result, new distribution planning practices such as “vendor managed inventory (VMI)”, common in the US and Europe, are rarely used in the Australian industry.  Traditionally, retail outlets (such as in Australia) typically check the level of stocks in their tanks and then send electronic replenishment orders to the distributor. The distributor (or an outsourced carrier) then decides how best to combine these orders into truck loads, schedule drivers and vehicles, and route the trucks over the road network.   VMI, in comparison, sees the distributor take responsibility for ensuring that there is always sufficient fuel available in the tanks at the fuel station. It requires sophisticated planning systems which can forecast consumption and optimize replenishment orders and tanker deliveries. The results are usually superior customer service at lower cost, with less working capital tied up in tanks.   Productivity can be further improved by introducing multi-compartments and tank metering onto fuel tankers, allowing distributors to move away from the “single drop” mentality.   For example, RKA Petroleum, a leading distributor on the US East coast, abandoned traditional logistics planning and implemented VMI almost ten years ago. As a result RKA improved driver and truck productivity by over 50% and reduced the miles driven by its tanker fleet by 27%.   “If private equity can apply similar principles to the Australian fuels distribution sector, they stand to make a tidy profit,” says Alan Thomas. ENDS About ORTEC ORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimization software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimize fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand and Asia. For more information, visit  www.ortec.com Media contact: Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700 Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand.  Diary note: ORTEC customer event on new insights and industry trends in logistics 2013-11-10T20:16:13Z diary-note-ortec-customer-event-on-new-insights-and-industry-trends-in-logistics Melbourne, 11 November 2013 - Logistics management software company ORTEC is hosting a seminar in Melbourne for its customers from the logistics and specialist transportation sector.The event is on 21st November at The Rydges, in Melbourne.The day, under the theme ‘Optimize Your World’ is designed to be a balance between industry trends, discussions among delegates about shared experiences, and new technologies. Alan Thomas, Joint Managing Director ORTEC Australia and New Zealand, explains: “It’s a simple phrase, but in practice ‘Optimize Your World’ involves sophisticated systems designed to manage and respond to multiple inputs. For logistics and workforce management operations, and for extended supply chains, these can vary hour by hour, or across longer periods that might be more predictable. When every element is optimized, the process of management becomes easier, and efficiency and profitability improve. This customer day reveals what’s underneath the systems that will be familiar to many in the room, what’s possible, and what will likely influence future thinking.”Speakers include Martin Savelsbergh, Professor of the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Newcastle (NSW), who will share his view on the growing importance of Operation Research techniques and technologies in business today, and Michael Oskam, Managing Director Global Business Development at ORTEC.Other topics include employee scheduling, logistics visibility, logistics planning and scheduling, and future product development at ORTEC.Go to www.ortec.com/australia/customerday for more information.ENDSAbout ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimization solutions and services. ORTEC’s products and services result in optimized fleet routing and dispatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting, logistics network planning and warehouse control. ORTEC offers stand-alone, custom-made and SAP- certified and embedded solutions, supported by partnerships. ORTEC has over 1,750 customers worldwide, 700 employees and offices in Europe, North America, South America and the Pacific Region. For more information, visit  www.ortec.comMedia contact:Event contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700Michelle van de Merwe, +61 481 567 349Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand.SAP is a registered trademark of SAP. Latest AFGC CHEP Retail Index underlines the need for inventive new thinking in logistics and supply chain operations 2013-10-28T22:07:08Z latest-afgc-chep-retail-index-underlines-the-need-for-inventive-new-thinking-in-logistics-and-supply-chain-operations Sydney, 29 October 2013 - The latest AFGC CHEP Retail Index, published jointly by the Australian Grocery and Food Council and CHEP Australia, shows that retail sales are growing at ever-smaller rates, that Christmas may well be a challenging period, and that away from the supermarket sector, discretionary spending by consumers remains cautious and subdued.Particularly for retailers with fixed assets such as properties, distribution centres and delivery infrastructures that include vehicles, the challenge is now to manage these assets more effectively than ever, so that they can keep outlets stocked with what consumers want to buy.“In-house logistics operations need to be even more flexible,” comments Alan Thomas, joint Managing Director of logistics systems company ORTEC Australia New Zealand. “Sophisticated planning and operations management systems can deliver savings, but the real benefits come from having operations that can meet the needs of the high-street outlet in as many combinations as possible. This means responding to consumer trends, ensuring stock levels are high without being too high, being able to react quickly to delivery problems, over-supply or under-supply, and having consignments packed and trucks loaded as efficiently as possible, so that drivers can engage with customers and maximise the number of deliveries for any given roster.“And outsourced logistics service providers need to ensure that their retail customers are provided with the same high level of service and flexibility.”Sophisticated logistics management techniques include ‘control tower’ operations and ‘open book contracts’.In control tower operations, supply chain managers monitor the flow of goods across multiple organisations within a supply chain, and plan deliveries using data that include the availability of vehicles, employees, and constraints such as roster limits and legal limitations on maximum driving hours. Planning accommodates special delivery needs or times, such as cross-docking, back-hauling or tight or difficult access. By taking this single view of an entire supply chain, embracing planning and operations, savings can be made, service improved and flexibility maximised.Open book contracts (OBCs) provide a way to mitigate the exposure to costs, especially when sales growth is low. Because they are by definition open, OBCs let retailers and shippers investigate new logistics options almost on the fly, because there is mutual trust and clearly-understood terms within the contract. For example, OBCs can help both parties minimise risk. For the shipper this is the risk of paying “too much”, or the risk of not providing the service their customers expect. For the third-party logistics operator it’s about not being caught out by changing (or ill-defined) freight characteristics of the shipper. In an uncertain retail market, both sides benefit from OBCs.Says Alan Thomas, “In any uncertain market with marginal growth and fixed assets, operational efficiency is crucial. Retailers should check that their logistics operations are as efficient as they can make them, and logistics operators should take the initiative in creating inventive new ways to become more efficient for their retail customers.”ENDSClick here for the AFGC CHEP Retail Index Edition 11, published October 2013About ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand and Asia. For more information, visit  www.ortec.comMedia contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand. The link between technology, operational efficiency and safe rates 2013-05-22T00:55:47Z the-link-between-technology-operational-efficiency-and-safe-rates Sydney, May 2013 - Truck drivers are the backbone of Australia. Without them there is no food on our supermarket shelves, no construction materials available to builders, and no petrol at the pumps. But recent research by the National Transport Commission (NTC) shows low rates of pay can lead to risky work practices by drivers to make ends meet. Factors contributing to the risk include financial pressures pushing transport operators to exceed allowable speed limits, driving hours, mass and dimensional limits, and unrealistic expectations or customers pressurising drivers to continue to drive when fatigued, or to speed. A 2010 NTC survey showed that the truck driving sector had more fatal injuries than other industries, and the cost of accidents involving heavy vehicles that resulted in deaths or serious injuries topped $2.7 billion.Last year the Federal Government passed the Road Safety Remuneration Bill 2012, dubbed 'Safe Rates' (Safe Rates Laws). The laws come equipped with a new industrial relations and safety tribunal with the power to inquire into all aspects of the road  transport industry, and to issue binding orders applicable across the industry, applicable to employees and contractor owner-drivers. And these laws are intended to address those underlying economic factors that the Government believes encourage unsafe road practices in the transport industry, such as speeding, excessive working hours, and unpaid queuing time.The Safe Rates legislation has introduced a ‘chain of responsibility’ requiring everyone in the supply chain, not just the driver, to prevent driver fatigue and ensure drivers are able to comply and operate safely and within the new laws. This includes those responsible for sending and receiving goods, the loaders, agents, schedulers, and operators, as well as the drivers. Many distribution and logistics firms deploy technology to improve efficiency, but another benefit is that this technology supports compliance with safety rates by managing the complex relationships between all of the factors listed above.One example is logistics giant LINFOX with its Vision Zero strategy for “zero fatalities, zero injuries, zero motor vehicle incidents, zero net environmental emissions and zero tolerance of unsafe behaviours.”ORTEC is seeing more of its software customers investing in on-board computer (OBC) technology that is then integrated with its transport management system (TMS) technology. There has been some push back by the transport sector on the cost of investment in OBC technology and associated training of drivers, but ORTEC has found that this investment is outweighed by a rapid return on investment (ROI) and by benefits such as reduced fuel consumption, reduce route times, lower maintenance costs, better engine diagnostics, better compliance with Safe Rates, and more.A 2011 international study by the US Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), which included Australia, confirmed that companies that have invested in technology to obtain operational efficiently are more profitable and have better safety and compliance standards.The financial, safety and technology benefits all now seem to be aligned for Australia’s logistics and transport sector.ENDSSourceshttp://www.linfox.com/Safety.aspxhttp://www.saferates.com.au/http://books.google.com.au/books?id=vs9o7fgnU6UC&pg=PA24&lpg=PA24&dq=Onboard+computers+benefits&source=bl&ots=Ro6CzqL8ji&sig=dRSjhr47ad90ynw8BYy2dnrNXvI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=unyRUavZNonHswbxzoDIAw&ved=0CGUQ6AEwBTgKhttp://www.ntc.gov.au/filemedia/Reports/NatTelematicsStratJuly2011.pdfAbout ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. For more information, visit www.ortec.com. Media contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700. Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand. Australian e-commerce growth presents new logistics challenges 2013-04-29T23:07:53Z australian-e-commerce-growth-presents-new-logistics-challenges Sydney, 30th April 2013 - Australian e-commerce is set to enjoy strong growth according to a recent report by IBIS World. But  the on-line industry is still hindered by a lack of infrastructure as logistics service providers attempt to catch up, according to logistics software company ORTEC. IBIS World predicts that revenue to Australian online retailers will reach $10 billion in the next five years, increasing 8.6% each year. Strong consumer demand and a dramatic increase in the range of goods available on-line will be the major catalysts for this e-commerce growth. One example is Australia Post, which has highlighted the e-commerce boom as a major contributor to its increased annual profit, and to the decline in its traditional mail volumes. It recently announced an overhaul to its parcel delivery services, and forecasts a doubling of on-line spending on its delivery services in the next five years. It expects revenue from its parcel business to hit $2 billion by 2015. But road humps in Australia’s logistics infrastructure are around the corner, often literally. One example is traffic congestion, which is a significant logistics cost. The Australian Department of Transport and Regional Economics predicts the avoidable cost of congestion in wasted time and fuel could reach $20 billion annually in 2020, more than enough to eat into the online revenues predicted by IBIS World. Flattening the humps, sidestepping infrastructure bottlenecks The solution comes in part from new-style logistics planning designed to fit a world in which fulfilment and delivery are almost instant, and in which the historic approach of having intermediate logistics stages in the form of distribution centres becomes less important. Australia’s logistics service providers and retailers might look to US retail giant Wal-Mart for insights into future operations. The growth of e-commerce and increasing fuel costs are forcing Wal-Mart to increase efficiency and improve customer service. By implementing a route scheduling solution in its grocery operations, Wal-Mart has improved trailer use and reduced empty mileage. With approximately 7,500 drivers, the Wal-Mart fleet drives round the world 30,000 times each year. The new planning system has seen Wal-Mart drivers log 49 million fewer miles last year, transport 57 million more cases, and save four million gallons of Diesel fuel. This is equivalent to removing 412 trucks from the road. Wal-Mart also avoided emitting over 40,000 metric tons of CO2 greenhouse gas emissions, the equivalent of 121 Hindenburg Zeppelins. Quotes from ORTEC From Alan Thomas, Joint Managing Director of ORTEC ANZ “The continued growth of e-commerce is attractive to Australian retailers of all kinds, and perhaps the last chance of survival for some. But this growth will put pressure on logistics preparations and infrastructure alike.” “E-commerce heralds new trends in logistics, and retailers will have to consider their operations and how these need to change, ahead of the changes also required in large infrastructure. Unfortunately, retailers will not be able to stop operations to take stock. “ “Flexible logistics operations that accommodate the ebb and flow of e-commerce demand, and which support rapid fulfilment, will become more important. Staging operations will present their own challenges: companies need to balance having this expensive infrastructure, the contribution it makes to fulfilment and operational flexibility, and how it integrates with national infrastructure.” “Australian retailers and e-commerce operations will need to consider the special characteristics of Australia’s logistics operations, including the highly localized population centres and distance.” ENDS   References ●        http://www.powerretail.com.au/news/ibis-world-australian-e-commerce-revenue-to-reach-10-billion/http://www.powerretail.com.au/news/ibis-world-australian-e-commerce-revenue-to-reach-10-billion/ ●        http://www.ie.unimelb.edu.au/matrix/about.html ●        http://www.ortec.com/us/The-Library/Press_Releases/2013_03_27_ORTEC_Walmart_Host_Webinar.aspx ●        https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2012-greenhouse-gas-conversion-factors-for-company-reportinghttps://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2012-greenhouse-gas-conversion-factors-for-company-reporting ●        http://www.ecogeek.org/component/content/article/3511-visualizing-co2-emissions ●        http://cta.ornl.gov/vtmarketreport/pdf/chapter3_heavy_trucks.pdf   Assumptions Total turnover of the Wal-Mart transportation company is approx. US$ 4 billion per year. The claim of a saving of 49 million miles is based on driving 55 miles/88 km per hour, saving 900,00 hours of driving time, which equates to 350 full-time-equivalent employees. Assuming a salary of US$30,000, this saves an estimated US$10 million. The saving of four  million US gallons of diesel is based on an average price of US$4.25 per gallon, equivalent to a saving of approx. US$17 million per year. For Australia, 4 million US gallons = 15,142,164 litres. With a median diesel price of AU$1.4/litre, this equates to savings of approx. AU$21.2 million per year. About ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. For more information, visitwww.ortec.com. Media contact: Alan Smith, alansmithconsulting@gmail.com, 0404 432 700. Issued on behalf of ORTEC ANZ. ORTEC at Field Service Management Summit 2013 2013-03-14T06:58:27Z ortec-at-field-service-management-summit-2013 Sydney, 14 April 2013 - The ANZ subsidiary of Dutch logistics management and planning software and consulting company ORTEC is becoming increasingly known in the local logistics sector with Australian customers that include Linfox, Coca-Cola-Amatil, McColl’s Transport and Coles. But less well known are ORTEC’s field service management solutions, used by a number of customers in northern Europe. It’s a market that the company is keen to open here in Australia and New Zealand.ORTEC is exhibiting at this year’s FSM 2013 show, which takes place at the Australian Technology Park, Sydney, on 20 March and 21 March.The show and conference are for field service management and field force automation applications. Each year the event brings together 200 senior managers from Australia and overseas to discuss the latest developments in field service management, workforce automation, asset management, dispatch management, general enterprise mobility and mobile computing.Field service planning has its own set of challenges, not least the large amounts of relatively small movements of personnel, expertise and equipment, usually to meet tightly-defined service level contracts with customers.There are also consequences associated with this “micro-planning” concept that tend to be specific to field service planning. Examples include having the wrong medication to hand when visiting an outpatient, or a tool missing to fix a critical piece of building infrastructure.These characteristics can mask what still remains essentially a branch of logistics planning. ORTEC will demonstrate its solutions for field service management, built on the experience of a number of customers in Europe that include DEKRA, Ricoh and Electrolux.ENDSAbout ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. For more information, visitwww.ortec.com.For information on FSM 2013, go to http://www.fsmaustralia.com.au/.Read ORTEC’s paper on field service management.Media contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand. Coles chooses ORTEC for new logistics system 2012-12-10T05:45:30Z coles-chooses-ortec-for-new-logistics-system Sydney, 10 December 2012 - ORTEC has announced that Coles has selected and implemented ORTEC’s routing and scheduling solution to improve the efficiency of its secondary distribution operations. Coles will use the ORTEC Transportation & Distribution (OTD) software to optimize transportation loads, trips and routes, and to despatch those trips through an on-board computer to the driver, without compromising safety. Based on real-time updates from the driver's on-board computer, ORTEC's software continuously optimizes trips and gives recommendations to planners and drivers. Sophisticated algorithms consider an extensive range of goals and constraints, including traffic congestion, to enable customers to achieve high service levels at minimum cost. Quote from ORTECAlan Thomas, Joint Managing Director of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand, said: "We believe we can contribute substantially to helping Coles achieve major improvements in its logistics operations. Coles’ decision cements ORTEC’s position as a leading provider of transportation planning and scheduling systems in Australia and New Zealand. Coles joins major retailers such as Walmart, Tesco and Carrefour in using ORTEC to optimise secondary distribution.” ENDSAbout ColesColes is a leading national food, liquor and convenience retailer in Australia. Coles employs more than 102,000 team members and handles over 11 million customer transactions a week across different brands, which include Coles and Bi-Lo supermarkets, Coles Express, 1st Choice Liquor Superstore, Liquorland, Vintage Cellars and Spirit Hotels. Coles is part of Wesfarmers Limited. About ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. For more information, visit www.ortec.com. Media contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700 Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand. ORTEC ANZ expands west 2012-12-04T07:07:13Z ortec-anz-expands-west MEDIA RELEASEORTEC ANZ expands westSydney, 4 December 2012 - ORTEC Australia & New Zealand has appointed Daniel Taylor to run its Western Australian operations, which have grown over the past two years. Known for its logistics and route planning systems, ORTEC has also built its Australian market share in workforce scheduling systems, especially in the natural resources sector.Mr Taylor joins the ANZ subsidiary from ORTEC’s parent company in the Netherlands, where he has been based for six years. He specializes in systems which manage the assignment of personnel, such as workforce scheduling and field service planning. ORTEC’S workforce planning, scheduling and management system, called ORTEC Harmony, is sold around the world in markets sectors that healthcare and emergency services, the petrochemical industry, manufacturing, retail and  hospitality, logistics, airline sectors, and mining.ORTEC Harmony lets managers understand and assign rosters based that place the right people with the right skills at the right point at the right moment. For organizations in Australia operating across different States and their respective legislations, ORTEC Harmony can manage workforces across these various jurisdictions and their associated regulations, something on which ORTEC cut its programming teeth in Europe.Quotes from ORTECDaniel Taylor, ORTEC regional manager for Western Australian, said: “Companies with large, diverse workforces, with different skills and needs, all require considerable management. And companies can choose to do this either by containing costs and minimizing disruption, or by placing the best-possible person on the most appropriate role. We think this is much more productive, for the organization and its customers, and of course for the individuals themselves.”Alan Thomas, joint managing director for ORTEC ANZ, said: “While it seems unfair to compare people to goods, the movement of pallets or shipping containers is, at the software level, analogous to moving people around an organization. It’s essentially about making sure that the right resource (a driver or a pallet) is in the right place at the right time. Except that assigning and moving people are more subtle and complicated, because human characteristics are in play, alongside regulations and occupational health and safety requirements.”ENDSAbout ORTECORTEC develops and sells advanced planning and optimization software solutions and consulting services primarily for the logistics sector. ORTEC systems optimize fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers and employs over 650 people in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand and Asia. For more information, visit  www.ortec.comMedia contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand. Patrick’s recent declaration of intent to charge $100 side loader fee another reason to consider new logistics partnerships beyond single organizations 2012-11-01T02:10:04Z patrick-s-recent-declaration-of-intent-to-charge-100-side-loader-fee-another-reason-to-consider-new-logistics-partnerships-beyond-single-organizations Sydney, 1 November 2012 - Patrick Stevedores Operations’ recent declaration of its intent to charge a $100 side loader fee (reported in various media outlets and blog sites) does more than increase import/export logistics infrastructure costs, presumably to the dismay of haulage firms and logistics companies.It also provides a much-needed catalyst to new thinking around partnerships, extending and consolidating logistics operations, and improving supply chain performance generally, thinking that has perhaps been tardy until now.To reduce the impact of container detention rules and other port costs such as side loader haulage, the staging time of containers needs to be minimized if not eliminated, to reduce container turnaround.One way round this is for companies to collaborate and integrate logistics systems and operations across the entire supply chain, not just transportation, across different companies.The concept of ‘end-to-end’ supply chain management then breaks out of the intra-company supply chain to embrace every ‘node’ on (say) a container’s movement from the original country of manufacture to the final distribution centre or even retail warehouse.Companies also need to create new ways to source capabilities so that they collaborate rather than purchase, share authority rather than direct results and integrate supply chain functions more broadly to discard operational and inter-company logistics silos. All these require knowledge, expertise and resources beyond the capabilities of a single organisation.This is the concept of fourth-party logistics (4PL) in which an organization manages the individual logistics services across a group of logistics providers that perform 3PL operations. Such a  4PL organization is founded on principles of shared risk and shared reward.This integration approach differs from the outsourcing alternative because it looks at the complete supply chain and the individual sets of resources feeding into it, rather than carving these up into discrete functions.Each of the disciplines of the supply chain must be evaluated. Any discipline found to be off the industry benchmark can then be replaced with an alternative. And the 4PL entity has the authority to act on behalf of the component members because it’s now in all of the members’ interests to do so.Collaborating in 4PL business models exploits and gains leverage from the existing assets and resources to create cohesive supply chains that can react to demand much more flexibly. Costs, including exposure to new tariffs such as container detention and staging,  and turnaround times are decreased. Perhaps the industry should thank Patrick’s after all.ENDSAbout ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand and Asia. For more information, visit  www.ortec.comMedia contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand. Better logistics can help supermarket profits and supplier margins, according to ORTEC 2012-10-15T11:33:42Z better-logistics-can-help-supermarket-profits-and-supplier-margins-according-to-ortec Sydney, 6 July 2012 - Reports that supermarket Woolworths is in negotiations with suppliers and is seeking another round of cost savings should prompt Australian supermarkets and their suppliers to revisit their logistics operations, according to logistics software company ORTEC.Alan Thomas, joint managing director of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand, said,  "ORTEC supplies logistics software to some of the biggest supermarket operations around the world, including here in Australia. So we can compare supplier margins, supermarket prices, and how both are influenced by how well suppliers ship to their supermarket customers, and how the supermarkets distribute goods through their own networks."Overseas, suppliers' margins are much smaller, so they have been forced to improve their logistics operations. One example is General Mills, in the United States, which uses advanced software to optimise the space it fills in every truck, literally down to the square centimetre. "If Australian suppliers and Australian supermarkets aren't already doing something similar, there is an opportunity  to find more savings per item in their logistics costs. There may well be literally room for improvement."ENDSAbout ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. For more information, visit  www.ortec.comMedia contact:Alan Smith, 0404 432 700Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand. ORTEC helps Reliance Transport win the multi-dimensional chess game of container haulage 2012-10-15T11:31:39Z ortec-helps-reliance-transport-win-the-multi-dimensional-chess-game-of-container-haulage Auckland and Sydney, 10 August 2012 - Auckland-based Reliance Transport has bought a new logistics and distribution scheduling system from global logistics software company ORTEC.The software is ORTEC’s Transportation & Distribution system (ORTEC TD) which will be used by Reliance Transport planners and dispatchers to manage the movements and rosters of trucks, trailers, drivers, chassis (‘skels’) and containers. ORTEC TD will help them react to last-minute changes to plans, events and delays as they occur, as well as track resources, monitor the status of orders, and measure the performance of the services the company provides.Reliance Transport will use ORTEC TD across its fleet of 34 trucks, including its 19 swinglift trailers.Reliance Transport is also introducing a new mobile data terminal (MDT) solution and a new order management system, and ORTEC TD will integrate these systems.Reliance Transport moves and positions containers between Auckland Port, its customers’ yards, and de-hire yards.The wharf cartage business is similar to multi-dimensional chess: the position of each container and truck  can influence the position and availability of almost every other resource combination in Reliance’s fleet, with repercussions and consequences for Reliance if one container, truck or trailer is delayed or in the wrong place at the wrong time.“Having an efficient transport distribution management and planning system means much more that being able to schedule trucks to position containers,” says Mark Darrah, General Manager of Reliance Transport. “If our business was the simple task of delivering containers from A to B, we could probably use simplistic systems such as spreadsheets.“But of course, it’s never that simple! There are delays to inbound shipping, traffic delays on Auckland’s roads, changes to shipments, customs operations, changing customer requirements, and more.“At the same time, it’s universally acknowledged that everyone in the logistics sector faces a shortage of drivers, even as freight is forecast to double by 2031.“By having a system such as ORTEC TD, we can plan for these challenges for the long term and manage our operations in the short term. We have to be this flexible to be of service to our customers, to manage the quality of the service we provide them, and help them provide value to their customers in turn.“And this new system will help us overcome the challenge of the shortage of drivers efficiently and flexibly while still keeping on top of our regulatory responsibilities towards our drivers in health and safety.”Richard SImpson, joint Managing Director of ORTEC ANZ, said, “ORTEC TD will give the Reliance Transport team new insights into orders, shipments, and performance benchmarks defined by managers. The planners will have the information they need to perform efficiently, and to have the flexibility to make decisions when things change.“ORTEC TD will also systematise the knowledge inside Reliance Transport, which will speed up the training of new planners. They will be able to learn the business working from standards and rules built into the ORTEC TD system.”ORTEC provides transportation and distribution systems for wharf cartage systems around the world, including Australia and Western Europe.ENDSAbout ORTECORTEC is one of the largest providers of advanced planning and optimisation software solutions and consulting services. ORTEC systems optimise fleet routing and despatch, vehicle and pallet loading, workforce scheduling, delivery forecasting and network planning. ORTEC has over 1,650 customers worldwide and employs over 650 employees and offices in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand and Asia. For more information, visit  www.ortec.comMedia contact:Alan Smith, +61 404 432 700Issued on behalf of ORTEC Australia & New Zealand.Note to editors: print-res version of picture available on request.